evidence and ideas. applied

Header---BBC-Press-Releases
Backgrounder Methodology Research Partners Question Wording

Increased Foreign Investment will be “Good for Africa”: Global Poll


22 February 2012 - Nearly two-thirds of those surveyed in a new 22-nation poll for BBC World Service think that the recent increase in overseas investment in Africa will prove to be a good thing for the continent, with African citizens among the most upbeat.

The findings of the poll, conducted by GlobeScan among 21,558 people, show that most respondents are relaxed about foreign companies purchasing long-term rights to African natural resources and land, with a majority rating such investments as either “very good” (19%) or “somewhat good” (44%) for Africa. Africans are among the most positive about this development, with Nigerians the most likely to rate it as a good thing for Africa (85%), a view shared by three in four Kenyans (75%) and Ghanaians (72%).

China, the source of much of the current foreign investment in Africa, is also positive about it, with nearly two-thirds of Chinese rating it as a good thing (64%) and only 18 per cent rating it as a bad thing. A much smaller proportion of Indians rates the wave of foreign investment in Africa as a good thing, however (47%).

Germany is the most doubtful, with over half of Germans (56%) reporting that the increase in overseas investment in Africa is a bad thing for the continent. Nearly half of French respondents (44%) feel the same.

The poll also asked respondents to indicate how optimistic they were that Africa would experience “major economic growth” over the next twenty years. It reveals that large majorities in the four African nations polled are either “very” or “somewhat” optimistic that this growth will take place. Eighty-five per cent feel this way in Egypt, 80 per cent in Nigeria, 75 per cent in Kenya, and 74 per cent in Ghana—higher proportions than in all other countries polled.

Globally, almost six in ten citizens (58%) are optimistic about Africa’s economic prospects, compared to 33 percent who are pessimistic. Citizens of developing nations in Asia and Latin America are among the most optimistic about Africa’s prospects, but optimists also outnumber pessimists in India (55% vs 26%), the USA (55% vs 42%), and China (50% vs 36%).

However, the poll also reveals that some of the industrialised nations that have been major aid donors to Africa over the years are among the most pessimistic that Africa’s economy will see a sustained improvement. Germans are again the most downbeat, with seven in ten (70%) pessimistic, compared to just 29 per cent who are optimistic. Pessimists also outnumber optimists in the UK (58% vs 38%) and France (56% vs 41%).

GlobeScan Chairman Doug Miller comments: “There is little evidence that the sovereignty concerns some policy experts have expressed over long-term Chinese investment in Africa have registered with average citizens. Most people around the world think recent foreign investment is good for Africa, and expect significant economic growth there over the next decade or two. Africans themselves are the most positive.”

A total of 21,558 citizens across 22 countries were interviewed face-to-face or by telephone between July 3, 2011 and September 16, 2011. Polling was conducted for BBC World Service by the international polling firm GlobeScan and its research partners in each country. In eight of the 22 countries, the sample was limited to major urban areas. The margin of error per country ranges from +/- 2.0 to 4.4 per cent, 19 times out of 20.


Participating Countries

bbc2012 africa country map

In Brazil, China, Ecuador, Egypt, Indonesia, Panama, the Philippines, and Turkey urban samples were used.


Media Contacts

For media interviews with the participating pollsters, please contact:

Sam Mountford, Research Director
GlobeScan Incorporated, London
+44 20 7928 5368
(Mobile: +44 7854 132625)
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Oliver Martin, Director, Global Development
GlobeScan Incorporated, Toronto
+1 416 969 3073
(Mobile: +1 416 721 3544)
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

About GlobeScan

GlobeScan Incorporated is an international opinion research consultancy. We provide global organisations with evidence-based insight to help them set strategy and shape their communications. Companies, multilateral institutions, governments, and NGOs trust GlobeScan for our unique expertise across reputation management, sustainability, and stakeholder relations. GlobeScan conducts research in over 90 countries, is ISO 9001-2008 quality certified and a signatory to the UN Global Compact.

Established in 1987, GlobeScan is an independent, management-owned company with offices in Toronto, London, and San Francisco. For more information, visit: www.globescan.com

About BBC World Service

The BBC World Service is an international multimedia broadcaster, delivering a wide range of language and regional services on radio, TV, online and via wireless handheld devices. It uses multiple platforms to reach its weekly audience of 166 million globally, including shortwave, AM, FM, digital satellite and cable channels. Its news sites include audio and video content and offer opportunities to join the global debate. BBC World Service offers its multilingual radio content to partner FM stations around the world and has numerous partnerships supplying content to news websites, mobile phones and other wireless handheld devices as well as TV channels. For more information, visit: www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice

Backgrounder: Region-by-Region Results

North America

In the US, respondents are mostly positive about the recent influx of foreign investment into Africa, with 61 per cent saying this investment is a good thing for Africa—in line with the global average of 63 per cent. On this question, American respondents are significantly more upbeat than respondents in any other big donor nation surveyed except the UK.

Respondents also appear quite optimistic about Africa’s economic prospects. Fifty-five per cent of Americans are optimistic that the African continent will experience major economic growth in the next 10 to 20 years—a figure in line with the 22-country global average (58%). It is noteworthy that as the top contributor to aid development, the US is significantly more optimistic than the surveyed major donor countries in the EU. Nonetheless, more than two in five Americans (42%) are pessimistic—well above the global average of 33 per cent.

Latin America

Attitudes in Brazil, the region’s economic giant, are sharply divergent. Brazilians are largely positive about the increased investments made in African economies by foreign companies. Two-thirds of Brazilians (66%) consider them a positive thing, while only 23 per cent say they are a bad thing—proportions in line with the global averages (63% and 24%). But Brazil also emerges as the least optimistic country in the region, with respondents divided on the issue of Africa's projected economic growth: 46 per cent of Brazilians are pessimists on this subject, compared to 47 per cent who are optimists.

Respondents in the other Latin American countries polled are also positive about the recent growth in foreign investment in Africa. Panamanians are the most upbeat, with an overwhelming majority seeing foreign investment as a good thing for African economies (77%). In Ecuador, Mexico, and Peru, majorities above or in line with the global average (63%) are also optimistic. In Chile, positive perceptions of foreign investment in Africa are not as strong, with only 51 per cent of Chileans stating that such investment is a good thing for the continent. A significant proportion of respondents offers no clear opinion (34%, the highest proportion in the survey).

Those who are optimistic about Africa’s economic prospects in the upcoming 20 years far outnumber those who are pessimistic (59% vs 27% at the regional level). However, there are differences at the country level. Panamanians are the most optimistic, with almost three-quarters (74%) who think that Africa will experience major economic growth over the next two decades. Strong majorities also share this opinion in Ecuador, Peru, and Mexico (65%, 63%, and 61% respectively). Respondents in Chile are not so upbeat, with only a plurality of 45 per cent that is optimistic, while almost one in three (29%) does not have an opinion on the issue—the highest percentage in the survey.

Europe

In the EU countries, the proportion that speaks positively about increasing investment by foreign companies in Africa is bigger than the proportion who are optimistic about Africa’s future economic prospects. However, EU respondents, except in Britain, remain comparatively much less upbeat than respondents in most other countries surveyed. Over six in ten Britons (62%) consider increasing foreign investment as a good thing for Africa—a figure in line with the global average (63%). A slim majority of French respondents (51%) also feels positive, and 49 per cent feel this way in Spain. However, these two countries have the second and third highest percentages of people that think that increased overseas investment in the African economy is a bad thing (44% and 40%, respectively). Germany is again the most doubtful among the countries surveyed, with 56 per cent of Germans reporting that such development is a bad thing for the continent—the only country with a majority of people with negative perceptions (against a global average of 24%).

Most European countries are pessimistic about Africa’s economic prospects for the 20 years ahead—Europe is the only region where pessimists outnumber optimists overall. At a regional level, four in ten Europeans (40%) say they are optimistic that Africa will experience a major phase of economic growth in the next two decades, as opposed to 51 per cent with pessimistic views.

Majorities of respondents in the four EU countries surveyed—all among the top ten contributors to foreign aid—are pessimistic about the future growth of African economies. Germans are the most downbeat, with seven in ten (70%) pessimistic, compared to just 29 per cent who are optimistic. Pessimists also outnumber optimists in the UK (58% vs 38%), France (56% vs 41%), and Spain (50% vs 42%). Among the countries surveyed, only these four have majorities of pessimists. Optimism is not widespread in Russia either, where a plurality of 42 per cent has pessimistic views about Africa’s economic prospects, although a high proportion (23%) has no definite opinion on the topic.

At the periphery of Europe, Turkey is the only surveyed country in Europe where a majority of respondents is optimistic that Africa will experience major economic growth in the next 10 to 20 years: 57 per cent are optimistic compared to 31 per cent pessimistic—figures very similar to the global averages (58% vs 33%). An even stronger majority of Turks considers increased foreign investment in Africa to be a good thing for the African continent: 72 per cent have positive views, which is above the 63 per cent global average.

Africa

Africans are among the most positive about the recent developments that have seen foreign companies purchase long-term rights to African natural resources and land. Nigerians are the most likely to rate these foreign investments as good for Africa (85%, highest percentage in the survey). Perceptions in Kenya (75%), Ghana (72%), and Egypt (71%) are also very positive, with proportions largely above the 63 per cent global average. These scores are equaled, or exceeded, only in the Philippines, Panama, and Turkey.

Africans are also very upbeat with regard to the future of their continent’s economy. In the four countries surveyed, very large majorities are optimistic that Africa will experience “major economic growth” over the next 10 to 20 years. Eighty-five per cent feel this way in Egypt, 80 per cent in Nigeria, 75 per cent in Kenya, and 74 per cent in Ghana. These proportions are higher than in any of the other countries polled except Panama (74%), and demonstrate Africans’ hope that strong and sustained economic growth will eventually alleviate poverty on the continent. Aggregated at the regional level, results show that only 18 per cent of Africans are pessimistic—a proportion much lower than the global average (33%).

Asia

Among the Asian countries surveyed, Filipinos are by far the most favourable towards increased overseas investment in Africa. Almost eight in ten (78%) think such investment represents a positive development for Africa—the second highest proportion in the survey after Nigeria. Sixty-three per cent of Indonesians and 54 per cent of Pakistanis share the same opinion. In India, a smaller proportion of Indians considers the growing wave of foreign investment in Africa to be a good thing. With only a plurality of 47 per cent of respondents reporting positive opinions, this is the third lowest percentage in the survey, sixteen points below the global average (63%).

When it comes to assessing Africa’s economic prospects for the 20 years ahead, optimists outnumber pessimists in Asia. At the regional level, 58 per cent say they are optimistic, compared to 27 per cent who are pessimistic—proportions very similar to those seen in Latin America. However, there are some disparities at the country level. Indonesians and Filipinos are the most optimistic that Africa will experience strong and sustained economic growth in the next two decades (68% and 66%, respectively). Respondents in India and Pakistan also share this opinion, but with slimmer majorities (55% and 53%), and the proportions of Indians and Pakistanis who are unable to give an answer are quite high (19% and 23%, respectively).

In China, optimism is more tempered, with just one in two respondents (50%) saying that the African continent is set to experience major economic growth in the next 10 to 20 years, and 36 per cent who have the opposite opinion. In contrast, when it comes to thinking about the impact of the increased foreign investment on Africa, nearly two-thirds of Chinese consider it a good thing for the continent (64%), and only 18 per cent see it as a bad thing.

Methodology

In total 21,558 citizens in Brazil, Chile, China, Ecuador, Egypt, France, Germany, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Panama, Peru, the Philippines, Russia, Spain, Turkey, the United Kingdom, and the United States were interviewed face-to-face or by telephone between July 3 and September 16, 2011. Polling was conducted for BBC World Service by GlobeScan and its research partners in each country.

In Brazil, China, Ecuador, Egypt, Indonesia, Panama, the Philippines, and Turkey urban samples were used. The margin of error per country ranges from +/- 2.0 to 4.4 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

 

CountrySample Size (unweighted)Field datesSample frameSurvey methodologyType of sample
Brazil 806 July 26 – August 15, 2011 18–69 Telephone Urban1
Chile 1200 August 18–29, 2011 18+ Face-to-face National
China 1000 July 13–31, 2011 18+ Telephone Urban2
Ecuador 497 August 27 – September 16, 2011 18+ Face-to-face Urban3
Egypt 1005 July 16–29, 2011 18+ Face-to-face Urban4
France 503 August 16–18, 2011 15+ Telephone National
Germany 1013 July 8–27, 2011 16–70 Telephone National
Ghana 1037 July 25 – August 20, 2011 18+ Face-to-face National
India 1254 July 15–29, 2011 18+ Face-to-face National
Indonesia 1000 July 3 – August 25, 2011 18+ Face-to-face Urban5
Kenya 816 August 5 – September 1, 2011 18+ Face-to-face National
Mexico 1000 July 23–28, 2011 18+ Face-to-face National
Nigeria 755 August 2–9, 2011 18–65 Face-to-face National
Pakistan 2400 July 18 – August 8, 2011 18+ Face-to-face National
Panama 750 August 9–22, 2011 18+ Telephone Urban6
Peru 1215 July 15–20, 2011 18–70 Face-to-face National
Philippines 800 July 23 – August 8, 2011 18+ Face-to-face Urban7
Russia 1006 July 22 – August 10, 2011 18+ Face-to-face National
Spain 501 September 1–10, 2011 18+ Telephone National
Turkey 1000 July 5–18, 2011 15+ Face-to-face Urban8
United Kingdom 1000 July 6 – August 23, 2011 18+ Telephone National
USA 1000 July 8 – August 18, 2011 18+ Telephone National
  1. In Brazil the survey was conducted in Belo Horizonte, Brasilia, Curitiba, Goiânia, Porto Alegre, Recife, Rio de Janeiro, Salvador, and São Paulo, representing 18 per cent of the national population.
  2. In China the survey was conducted in Beijing, Beiliu, Chengdu, Dujiangyan, Fenyang, Fuyang, Guangzhou, Hangzhou, Manzhouli, Quanzhou, Qujing, Shanghai, Shenyang, Shuangcheng, Wuhan, Xi'an, Xining, and Zhengzhou, representing 45 per cent of the national adult population.
  3. In Ecuador the survey was conducted in Cuenca, Guayaquil and Quito, representing 52 per cent of the urban population.
  4. In Egypt the survey was conducted in Alexandria, Cairo, Giza, and Shubra El-Kheima, representing 24 per cent of the national population.
  5. In Indonesia the survey was conducted in Bandung, Jakarta, Makassar, Medan, and Surabaya, representing 27 per cent of the national adult population.
  6. In Panama the survey was conducted in Panamá, Chiriquí, Colón, Coclé, Veraguas, Herrera, Bocas del Toro and Los Santos, representing 70 per cent of the adult population.
  7. In the Philippines the survey was conducted in the National Capital Region, representing 27 per cent of the urban adult population.
  8. In Turkey the survey was conducted in Adana, Ankara, Antalya, Bursa, Diyarbakir, Erzurum, Istanbul, Izmir, Konya, Samsun, and Zonguldak, representing 56 per cent of the national adult population.

Research Partners

CountryResearch InstituteLocationContact
Brazil Market Analysis Florianópolis Fabián Echegaray This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
+55 48 3364 0000
Chile Mori Chile Santiago Marta Lagos
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
+56 2334 4544
China GlobeScan Toronto Oliver Martin
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
+1 416 969 3073
Ecuador Propraxis / Sigma Dos Quito Carlos Moreno
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
+593 7 2888519
Egypt Attitude Market Research Cairo Mohamed Al Gendy
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. '; document.write(''); document.write(addy_text40882); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
+202 22711262
France Efficience 3 Paris and Rheims Christian de Thieulloy
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
+33 1 4316 5442
Germany Ri*QUESTA GmbH Teningen Bernhard Rieder
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
+49 7641 93 43 36
Ghana Business Interactive Consulting Limited Accra Razaaque Animashaun
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
+233 302 783140 / +233 302 782892
India Team C Voter Noida Yashwant Deshmukh
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
+91 120 4175200 (ext. 223)
Indonesia DEKA Marketing Research Jakarta Irma Malibari
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
+62 21 723 6901
Kenya Research Path Associates Ltd. Nairobi Jeremy Mwololo
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
+254 020 2734770
Mexico Parametria Mexico City Francisco Abundis
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
+52 55 2614 0089
Nigeria Millward Brown Lagos Michael Umogun
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
+234 802 311 7969
Pakistan Gallup Pakistan Islamabad Ijaz Shafi Gilani
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
+92 51 2655630
Panama Dichter & Neira Panama City Gabriel Neira
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
+ 507 236 4000
Peru Datum Lima Urpi Torrado
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. '; document.write(''); document.write(addy_text44036); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
+511 215 0600
Philippines M&S-Sigma Dos Philippines, Inc. Makati City Teodora Marasigan
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
+63 2 8172780
Russia CESSI Institute for Comparative Social Research Moscow Vladimir Andreenkov
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
+7 495 650 55 18
Spain Sigma Dos Int. Madrid Gines Garrido
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. '; document.write(''); document.write(addy_text259); document.write('<\/a>'); //-->\n This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
+34 91 360 0474
Turkey Yöntem Research Consultancy Ltd. Istanbul Bülent Gündoğmuş
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
+90 212 278 1219
United Kingdom Populus Data Solutions London Patrick Diamond
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
+44 207 553 4148
USA Populus Data Solutions London Patrick Diamond
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
+44 207 553 4148

Question Wording

M4.

How optimistic, if at all, are you that Africa will experience major economic growth over the next ten to twenty years?

READ OUT. CODE ONE ONLY

  • 01 Very optimistic
  • 02 Somewhat optimistic
  • 03 Not very optimistic
  • 04 Not at all optimistic
  • VOLUNTEERED / DO NOT READ OUT
  • 99 Don’t know / not applicable
M5.

There has been a significant increase in overseas investment in Africa over recent years, with foreign companies purchasing long- term rights to natural resources and land. Some say this brings much needed investment to Africa, while others have concerns about loss of local control over valuable resources.

To what extent do you think that this foreign investment is a good or a bad thing for Africa?

READ OUT. CODE ONE ONLY

  • 01 Very good
  • 02 Somewhat good
  • 03 Somewhat bad
  • 04 Very bad
  • VOLUNTEERED / DO NOT READ OUT
  • 99 Don't Know / Not applicable

Small-Square---Our-Partners Small-Square---Our-Clients Small-Square---Our-Expertise

Press Releases

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER: @GLOBESCAN