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Fake Internet Content a High Concern, but Appetite for Regulation Weakens

21 September 2017 – Almost four out of five Internet users worry about what is real and fake on the Internet (79%), with nearly half (45%) strongly identifying with this concern, according to a new global poll conducted in 18 countries for the BBC World Service.

The poll of more than 16,000 adults conducted by GlobeScan between January and April 2017 also found that, despite their concern about fake Internet content, a growing proportion of Internet users are opposed to governmental regulation. On average, in the 15 tracking countries surveyed, the proportion agreeing that the Internet should never be regulated by any level of government has increased, from 51 per cent in 2010 to 58 per cent in 2017.

This pushback against regulation comes in the context of greater advocacy for ensuring universal access to the Internet. In the 16 tracking countries surveyed on this question, an average of 82 per cent think that access to the Internet should be a fundamental right of all people, up from 79 per cent in 2010. In the same interval, Internet usage has expanded globally, with 75 per cent reporting personal use of it in the past six months in 2017, a jump of 16 points compared to seven years ago (59%).

The countries with the highest proportions opposed to any sort of government regulation of the Internet include Greece (84%), Nigeria (82%), Brazil (72%), France (71%), and Turkey and Kenya (each 70%). These countries also tend to be those where opposition to regulation has grown most notably since 2010: the largest increases are 24 points in France, 19 points in Brazil, and 16 points in Turkey.

In a number of Western nations, apart from Greece and France, attitudes towards Internet regulation are rather mixed. Opinion in Canada, Australia, Spain, and Germany is polarised on this topic, with the proportions in favour of government intervention trailing the majorities against it by just a few points. In the UK, a narrow but stable majority (53%) continues to favour some sort of regulation. The only other surveyed country to share this view is China, where a growing majority is willing to support Internet regulation by authority (67%, up 9 points).

As Internet usage has widened, anxiety about what is real and fake online has spread. Brazilians are the most worried about this, with 92 per cent reporting some level of concern. Other emerging economies also report high unease, especially in Indonesia (90%), Nigeria (88%), and Kenya (85%). Elsewhere in the world, reported levels of concern about fake Internet content are also quite high, ranging from 75 to 85 per cent in most countries, with the exception of Germany—the only surveyed nation with a narrow majority (51%) stating that they are not worried about this.

The poll also reveals that Internet users are increasingly wary of expressing their opinions online. In the tracking countries, a majority (53%) do not feel safe doing this in 2017, compared to 49 per cent in 2010. Cautious web users now outnumber those who feel safe to speak their minds online (46%). Caution is more pronounced in developed economies, while attitudes in developing economies are more relaxed, with strong majorities reporting feeling safe to express their opinions online in Nigeria (94%, up 10 points since 2010), Peru (88%), Indonesia (73%, up 7 points), Kenya (71%, stable), and China (66%, a leap of 23 points).

This is in stark contrast with the anxious mood in the Western countries surveyed, where (except in Germany) solid and strongly increasing majorities report unease about expressing their opinions in Europe, North America, and Australia. The French and the Greeks are least likely to see the Internet as a safe place to speak freely (82% and 75%, respectively). German perceptions stand at odds with this trend, with anxiety diminishing to 53 per cent in 2017, a large drop from 2010, when a strong majority (72%) did not see the Internet as a safe place to express opinion. Attitudes in Germany are now closer to those in Russia, Turkey, Mexico and Brazil.

GlobeScan Chairman Doug Miller commented: “The significant poll finding here is the strengthened opposition to any sort of government control over the Internet (up 7 points since 2010). This is despite the poll findings showing people’s comfort in expressing their opinions online has fallen since 2010, likely due to Edward Snowden’s 2013 NSA surveillance revelations. However, Snowden’s impact appears to have been modest on this measure (down only 4 percentage points). This suggests that the present high concern about ‘fake news’ may not affect people’s on-line behaviour very much, apart from them doing more fact-checking.”

The results are drawn from a survey of 16,542 adult citizens across 18 countries, including 11,799 Internet users, conducted for BBC World Service by the international polling firm GlobeScan and its research partners in each country. GlobeScan coordinated fieldwork, involving telephone and in-person interviews, between 13 January and 27 April 2017. In five of the 18 countries, the sample was limited to major urban areas. The margin of error per country ranges from +/- 2.9 to 3.9 per cent. 


Key Demographic Findings

The poll also highlights some differences by gender. Globally, personal usage of the Internet is more widespread among men than among women (78% vs 71%), and this trend extends across 13 out of 17 countries, including developed nations such as France, Germany, Spain, and the USA.

Female Internet users are less likely than male users to feel safe expressing their opinions online. Globally, only 44 per cent of female respondents are unafraid to speak their minds, outweighed by the 54 per cent who report anxiety about this. Male respondents are split on this topic (49% vs 50%). This anxiety among women is more pronounced in developed countries such as the UK (just 36% feeling safe), USA (35%), Canada and Australia (each 29%), Spain (23%), Greece (19%), and France (just 14%).

Attitudes towards government regulation of the Internet are fairly similar across genders globally, with global majorities of both male and female respondents opposing regulation (62% and 58%, respectively). Some gender differences appear in some countries, however. While majorities of male Internet users oppose regulation in Australia, Canada, Germany, and Spain, their female counterparts are split on this question. In the UK, a majority of women (56%) actually favour some regulation while men are equally divided. British women are also significantly more worried than their male counterparts about fake content on the internet (77% vs 65%).

Looking at age categories, there is still a strong generational gradient in Internet usage, which is near-universal (96%) among under-18s, but has reached fewer than half (45%) of over-65s. Within this wider pattern, the most notable difference in perceptions between Millennials and the older groups relates to their more relaxed attitude to expressing their opinion online. Globally, in 17 countries, 57 per cent feel safe to speak their mind among 18-24 year old respondents, but this proportion decreases steadily as respondents get older, falling to just 39 and 30 per cent among the 55-64 year old group and those aged more than 65, respectively. This generational difference is particularly apparent in Germany, Mexico, Brazil, and to some extent in the UK and in Australia.

Globally, younger respondents aged 18 to 24 years old are also more likely than their elders to oppose government regulation of the Internet: 64 per cent report this opinion, while the proportion steadily decreases among the older cohorts, falling to just 53 per cent among the oldest cohort. And, perhaps because their use of the internet is more common, they show greater concern about fake content online (80% vs 77% and 76% among the 45-54 and 55-64 age groups, respectively).


participating countries

In Brazil, China, Indonesia, Kenya, and Turkey, urban samples were used.


Findings

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Media Contacts

For media interviews, please contact:

  • Stacy Rowland, Director Public Relations and Communications, GlobeScan Incorporated

About the BBC World Service

BBC World Service is an international multimedia broadcaster, delivering a wide range of language and regional services on radio, TV, online and via wireless handheld devices. It uses multiple platforms to reach its weekly audience of 192 million globally, including shortwave, AM, FM, digital satellite and cable channels. Its news sites include audio and video content and offer opportunities to join the global debate. BBC World Service offers its multilingual radio content to partner FM stations around the world and has numerous partnerships supplying content to news websites, mobile phones and other wireless handheld devices as well as TV channels. For more information, visit bbc.com/worldservice.

Methodology

In total 16,542 citizens in Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Greece, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Mexico, Nigeria, Peru, Russia, Spain, Turkey, the UK, and the United States were interviewed face-to-face or by telephone between January 13, 2017 and April 27, 2017. Polling was conducted for BBC World Service by GlobeScan and its research partners in each country.

In Brazil, China, Indonesia, Kenya, and Turkey urban samples were used. The margin of error per country ranges from +/- 2.9 to 3.9 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

Country
Sample Size (unweighted)
Field dates
Sample frame
Survey methodology
Type of sample
Australia 800 February 6–19, 2017 18+ Telephone National
Brazil 810 March 20 – April 10, 2017 18-69 Face-to-face Urban1
Canada 1000 January 27 – February 15, 2017 18+ Telephone National
China 1171 February 24, – April 25, 2017 18+ Telephone Urban2
France 1009 February 6-16, 2017 18+ Telephone National
Germany 634 January 13–31, 2017 16-70 Telephone National
Greece 709 March 17 – April 19, 2017 18+ Telephone National
India 1018 January 19 – March 23, 2017 18+ Telephone National
Indonesia 1000 March 8–22, 2017 18+ Face-to-face Urban3
Kenya 1010 February 1–15, 2017 18+ Face-to-face Urban4
Mexico 799 April 22–27, 2017 18+ Face-to-face National
Nigeria 800 February 2–8, 2017 18+ Face-to-face National
Peru 1000 April 13–26, 2017 18-70 Face-to-face National
Russia 1018 February 3-22, 2017 18+ Telephone National
Spain 797 February 8-15, 2017 18+ Telephone National
Turkey 966 March 2–20, 2017 15+ Face-to-face Urban5
United Kingdom 1001 January 27 – February 19, 2017 18+ Telephone National
USA 1000 January 19 February 1, 2017 18+ Telephone National
  1. In Brazil the survey was conducted in Belo Horizonte, Brasília, Curitiba, Goiânia, Porto Alegre, Recife, Rio de Janeiro, Salvador, São Paulo, representing 23 per cent of the national adult population.
  2. In China the survey was conducted in Beijing, Chengdu, Chongqing, Dalian, Guangzhou, Hangzhou,  Harbin, Shanghai, Shenyang, Shijiazhuang, Tianjin, Wuhan, Xi’an, and Zhengzhou, representing 15 per cent of the national adult population.
  3. In Indonesia the survey was conducted in Bandung, Jakarta, Makassar, Medan, and Surabaya, representing 8 per cent of the national adult population.
  4. In Kenya the survey was conducted in Bomet, Bungoma, Elgeyo-Marakwet, Embu, Homa Bay,   Kajiago, Kakamega, Kericho, Kiambu, Kilifi, Kirinyaga, Kisii, Kisumu, Kwale, Machakos, Makueni, Meru, Migori, Mombasa, Nairobi, Nakuru, Nyandarua, Siaya, Tharaka, Turkana, Uasin, Gishu, and Vihiga, representing 32 per cent of the national adult population.
  5. In Turkey the survey was conducted in İstanbul, Tekirdağ, Bursa, İzmir, Adana, Samsun, Trabzon, Ankara, Kayseri, Malatya, Diyarbakır, and Erzurum, representing 47 per cent of the national adult population.

Research Partners

Country Research Institute Location Contact
Australia GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767
Brazil Market Analysis Florianopolis Fabián Echegaray
fabian@marketanalysis.com.br
+55 48 3364 0000
Canada GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767
China GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767
France Efficience 3 Paris and Rheims Thierry Laurain
thierry.l@efficience3.com
+33 1 4316 5442
Germany Ri*QUESTA GmbH Teningen Bernhard Rieder
riquesta.rieder@t-online.de
+49 7641 93 43 36
Greece MRB Hellas Athens Vivian Antonopoulou
vantonopoulou@mrb.gr
+30210 6971000 /+306944 414756
India Team C Voter Noida Yashwant Deshmukh
yashwant@teamcvoter.com
+91 120 424 7135
Indonesia DEKA Marketing Research Jakarta Ratna Mulia Darmawan
ratna.darmawan@deka-research.co.id
+62 21 723 6901
Kenya Research Path Associates Ltd. Nairobi Charles Onsongo
charles.onsongo@rpa.co.ke
+254 20 2734770
Mexico Parametría Mexico City Francisco Abundis
fabundis@parametria.com.mx
+52 55 2614 0089
Nigeria Market Trends Lagos Jo Ebhomenye
joebhomenye@hotmail.com
+234 1734 7384
Peru Datum Lima Urpi Torrado
urpi@datum.com.pe
+511 215 0600
Russia CESSI Institute for Comparative Social Research Moscow Vladimir Andreenkov
vladimir.andreenkov@cessi.ru
+7 495 650 55 18
Spain Sigma Dos Int. Madrid Petrana Valentinova
petrana@sigmados.com
+34 91 360 0474
Turkey Yöntem Research Consultancy Ltd. Istanbul Mehmet Aktulga
mehmet.aktulga@yontemresearch.com
+90 212 278 12 19
United Kingdom Populus Data Solutions London Patrick Diamond
pdiamond@populusdatasolutions.com
+44 207 553 4148
USA GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767

Questionnaire

M3t. Have you personally used the internet or E-mail in the past six months?

01 – Yes
02 – No

VOLUNTEERED (DO NOT READ)

99 – DK/NA

 

M4. To what extent do you agree or disagree that…

ct. The internet is a safe place to express my opinions [ASKED ONLY IF YES AT M3]

01 – Strongly agree
02 – Somewhat agree
03 – Somewhat disagree
04 – Strongly disagree

VOLUNTEERED (DO NOT READ)

99 – DK/NA

gt. The internet should never be regulated by any level of government anywhere [ASKED ONLY IF YES AT M3]

ht. Access to the internet should be a fundamental right of all people [ASKED TO ALL]

e. I worry about what is real and what is fake on the Internet [ASKED ONLY IF YES AT M3]

Sharp Drop in World Views of US, UK: Global Poll

4 July 2017 – Negative views of US influence in the world have increased in the majority of countries surveyed in the latest global country poll for the BBC World Service. Compared to 2014, when the poll was last conducted, double-digit increases in negative views of the US, rising to majorities, are now found in several of its NATO allies, including the UK (up from 42 to 64%), Spain (44 to 67%), France (41 to 56%), and Turkey (36 to 64%). Negative opinion has also sharply risen in Latin American nations Mexico (up from 41 to 59%), and Peru (29 to 49%). In Russia, negative views of the US have also increased, from 55 to 64 per cent.

The Country Ratings Poll was conducted by GlobeScan/PPC among 18,000 people in 19 countries between December 2016 and April 2017. It asked respondents to rate 16 countries and the EU on whether their influence in the world is “mostly positive” or “mostly negative.”

On average, across the 17 countries that were surveyed in both 2017 and 2014, negative views of US influence in the world have gone up by six points to nearly half (49%), while positive views have dropped by five points to about a third (34%). The US showed the most substantial decline in ratings out of all the countries polled this year.

The poll also reveals that views of the United Kingdom, historically quite positive, have gone down, led by pronounced drops in positive views among EU citizens in Germany (down from 51 to 35%), France (72 to 63%), and Spain (41 to 34%). Similar declines are also seen in several of the Commonwealth nations such as Pakistan (down from 39 to 20%), India (43 to 33%), and Canada (80 to 73%). Attitudes in China buck this trend, with favourable opinion of the UK among the Chinese rising markedly, from 39 to 73 per cent. A slight majority of 51 per cent across the 17 tracking countries still regards British influence in the world as mostly positive, but this is down four points since 2014.

 

On the more positive side, perceptions of Canada have warmed up, with positive ratings rising by five points to an average of 61 per cent across the 17 tracking countries. The biggest jumps are found in Mexico, (up from 42 to 69%), Brazil (50 to 71%), China (63 to 82%), Germany (53 to 63%), and Turkey (33 to 43%). On average, Canada is now ranked first in terms of the perceived positive influence the country projects in the world, ahead of Germany (which stands at 59%, up by 1 point).

In the ranking of favourably-viewed nations, Canada and Germany are followed by Japan, whose perceived positive influence has strongly bounced back (56%, up 6 points), ending a correction period that started in 2013. France (52%, up 4 points) and the EU (48%, up 3 points) complete the leader board of those countries that have seen their positive influence capital grow since 2014.

Attitudes towards the perceived world influence of other rated countries reflect recent geopolitical tensions. Views of Russia continue to be quite negative, sustaining a sharp decline that began in 2013. On average, across the 17 tracking countries, 49 per cent hold negative views of Russia. Russian opinion aside, the only country with a majority leaning favourably towards Russia is China, where positive ratings have gone up from 55 to 74 per cent. Public opinion towards North Korea is also at its lowest since tracking began, with 59 per cent across the tracking countries expressing an unfavourable view towards the Pyongyang regime (up 3 points since 2014, and swamping positive feelings at 17%). Yet, Iran continues to be the least-favourably viewed nation, with 61 per cent rating its influence negatively across the tracking countries.

Steven Kull, Director of PPC, commented: “Though views of the US slipped some in President Obama’s later years, ratings for the US have now gone all the way back to levels they were at the end of the George W. Bush administration.”

 

A total of 17,910 citizens across 19 countries were interviewed face-to-face or by telephone between December 26, 2016 and April 27, 2017. Polling was conducted for BBC World Service by the international polling firm GlobeScan and its research partners in each country, together with the Program for Public Consultation (PPC) at the University of Maryland. Countries were rated by half samples in all countries polled except for India. In five of the 19 countries, the sample was limited to major urban areas. The margin of error per country ranges from +/- 3.1 to 5.2 per cent.

Other Key Findings

The poll also highlights that the global public has mixed feelings about the current influence of some emerging economies. While views of Brazil still lean to the positive—on average, 38% positive vs 30% negative across tracking countries—there has been a six-point drop in positive views, fuelled by diverse regions and aggravating a decline that started in 2013. The largest decreases are found in Indonesia (down from 56 to 36%), the US (55 to 40%), Canada (56 to 41%), Germany (21 to 6%), Spain (35 to 21%), and Peru (61 to 48%). Interestingly, Brazilians themselves are leading this trend, with positive views of their own country plunging from 66 to 30 per cent—the only surveyed country where fewer than half see their own nation in a positive light.

Global views of China have also become more negative, although less drastically. On average, across the 17 tracking countries, positive ratings of China have dropped (from 43 to 41%) and negative ratings have gone up (from 40 to 42%). However, this moderate overall movement masks some dramatic changes in opposite directions in specific countries. Favourable views have dropped from 52 to 28 per cent in Indonesia, while rising from 33 to 55 per cent in Mexico. However, views in Africa, where China is making major investments, continue to be strongly positive (83% in Nigeria, 63% in Kenya). Despite Chinese warm opinion of Russia these days, only 44 per cent of Russians reciprocate with a positive view of China.

Views of India are stable, with average positive views across tracking countries at 37 per cent (down by 1 point), and negative views at 39 per cent (unchanged from 2014)—but this masks some major movements. Most strikingly, negative views have jumped in China (from 35 to 56%), and in Brazil (36 to 57%). In Nigeria, positive views have collapsed from 64 to 47 per cent. On the other hand, negative views have dropped from 50 to 35 per cent in Spain, while positive views have jumped from 45 to 56 per cent in the UK (by far the most favourable country towards India).

The issue of Brexit notwithstanding, positive views of the European Union have gone up from 45 to 48 per cent. Even in the UK, positive views are up to 55 per cent—the highest level since 2009, although it is unclear whether this reflects second thoughts about Brexit or more satisfaction with an EU that is seen as having been pushed to a comfortable distance. The favourable trend in views of the EU is also led by strong increases in positive ratings from countries where its trade relationships have strengthened, including China (from 32 to 66%), Mexico (37 to 54%), and Canada (64 to 70%).

GlobeScan’s Associate Director Lionel Bellier commented: “The poll suggests that perceptions of the influence of the UK in the world, at a high in 2014 after 10 years of tracking, may have taken a toll with the Brexit referendum. On the other hand, and despite uncertainty around the terms and impact of the upcoming separation with the UK, the perceived influence of the EU seems to be stronger than it was before the UK voted itself out.”

 

For full methodology, question wording, and detailed results, including region-by-region data for all key questions, please see the drop-down links at the bottom of this article.


Participating Countries

In Brazil, China, Indonesia, Kenya, and Turkey, urban samples were used.


Long-Term Trends

 



Media Contacts

For media interviews, please contact:

  • Stacy Rowland, Director Public Relations and Communications, GlobeScan Incorporated
  • Lionel Bellier, Associate Director, GlobeScan Incorporated
  • Steven Kull, Director, Program for Public Consultation

The Program for Public Consultation (PPC) of the Center for International and Security Studies at the University of Maryland, undertakes research on attitudes in publics around the world on a variety of international issues and manages the international research project WorldPublicOpinion.org

BBC World Service is an international multimedia broadcaster, delivering a wide range of language and regional services on radio, TV, online and via wireless handheld devices. It uses multiple platforms to reach its weekly audience of 192 million globally, including shortwave, AM, FM, digital satellite and cable channels. Its news sites include audio and video content and offer opportunities to join the global debate. BBC World Service offers its multilingual radio content to partner FM stations around the world and has numerous partnerships supplying content to news websites, mobile phones and other wireless handheld devices as well as TV channels. For more information, visit bbc.com/worldservice.

Backgrounder: Country-by-Country Results

The following sections examine in detail the poll results for each of the countries rated.

The United States

USA

Global views of the United States have continued to deteriorate since 2014 in the majority of countries surveyed. In the 17 tracking countries polled about US influence in the world in both 2014 and 2017, an average of 34 per cent of respondents hold positive views, while 49 per cent hold negative views. Compared to 2014, this represents a decrease of five points in positive opinion and an increase of six points in negative opinion.

In terms of positive views, the US ranks twelfth out of 17 nations evaluated, and has dropped three places in this ranking since 2014. Of the 19 countries surveyed in 2017 (including the US), 14 lean negatively overall, four lean positively, and one is of divided opinion (Brazil). It is noteworthy that a very strong majority of Americans remains convinced that their country has a positive influence in the world—71 per cent, the highest proportion since 2005 (which was also 71%).

Views of US influence have deteriorated most steeply in Spain, the United Kingdom, and Turkey. Russia is the most antagonistic country surveyed. Only 7 per cent of Russian respondents hold a positive opinion of US influence, a fall of 14 points since 2014. Over the same interval, negative views have increased by nine points, to 64 per cent. Turkey saw the largest surge in negative views: a 28-point increase (rising to 64%), matched by a decrease of 16 points in positive views (to 20%). As a result, Turkish opinion has shifted from being divided in 2014 to being strongly negative in 2017. 2014 was the only year since tracking began in 2005 when Turkish views towards the US were not predominately negative.

In most of the Western European countries surveyed, negative views of US influence have increased, while positive views have decreased. In Spain, negative views are the highest of all of the countries surveyed, with 67 per cent posting negative ratings (up by 23 points since 2014), while positive ratings have dropped from 39 per cent to 16 per cent. In the UK, opinion has shifted dramatically, as negative attitudes are now expressed by almost two-thirds (64%, up by 22 points), while positive attitudes have fallen to one-third (33%, down by 19 points). This is the most negative perception the UK has reported towards the US since tracking began in 2005. In France, 58 per cent hold negative views (up by 17 points), while 37 per cent hold positive views (down by 14 points). As in the UK, French opinion is now leaning negatively for the first time since 2009. German views also remain generally unfavourable towards the US, but German opinion bucks the trend among Western European nations, with negative views dropping since 2014, when public opinion had been curdled by the revelation of a surveillance programme aimed at the German government by the American NSA. The proportion of negative views among Germans has fallen from 57 per cent to 40 per cent. Nonetheless, positive views remain low (although stable) at 22 per cent. Greece leans negatively as well, although less so than its EU counterparts. Thirty-eight per cent among Greeks hold a negative opinion of the US, with 30 per cent offering a positive opinion.

Views of the US have also deteriorated among respondents in neighbouring countries. In Canada, the proportion offering unfavourable ratings has increased by six points to 58 per cent, while positive views have fallen by nine points to 34 per cent. The level of negative opinion in Mexico is similar (59%), and has increased by 18 points, while positive perceptions have decreased by six points to 29 per cent. In other Latin American countries, unfavourable views are also becoming more prominent, especially in Peru, where perceptions lean negatively for the first time since tracking began in 2011. Since 2014, negative views among Peruvians have surged by 20 points to half (49%), while positive views have fallen by eight points to 40 per cent. In Brazil, opinion has soured and is now divided, with negative ratings increasing to 44 per cent (up by 6 points), and positive opinion decreasing to 42 per cent (down by 9 points).

In Asia, attitudes towards US influence are diverse. Overall, opinion in China remains unfavourable, with a high and stable proportion of 61 per cent saying that the US has a negative influence in the world. However, the proportion with positive views has risen by 15 points since 2014, to 33 per cent. Opinion in Australia also leans negatively: 52 per cent have a negative opinion (up by 6 points), while 42 per cent have a positive opinion (stable). Indonesia and Pakistan have similar opinions of US influence, with strong pluralities viewing it negatively in both countries. Nevertheless, feelings among Pakistanis have warmed, with a notable decrease in negative views, which have fallen from 61 per cent in 2014 to 43 per cent in 2017 (the lowest proportion since tracking began in 2010). Positive views of the US among Pakistanis are at their highest surveyed level following an eight-point increase to 24 per cent. India is the only surveyed country in continental Asia that shows a comfortable plurality expressing favourable views of the US (40%, vs 26% holding negative views).

In contrast to negative global trends, African opinions of the US are largely positive and have become more so since 2014. In Nigeria, the proportion holding positive views has increased by nine points to 68 per cent—the highest value among all the countries surveyed except the US itself. Over the same time, the proportion of Nigerians holding negative views has decreased by seven points to 22 per cent. Respondents in Kenya also hold largely positive views of US influence, with 67 per cent speaking well of the US (up by 12 points since 2014), and negative views holding stable at 21 per cent.

 


 

Russia

Russia

Global views of Russia have remained fairly stable since 2014. However, opinion has never been so negative in many individual countries in the years of this survey, nor (in some cases) positive inclination so low. On average in the 17 tracking countries surveyed both in 2014 and 2017, 29 per cent report a positive perception of Russia (down by 1 point), and 49 per cent report a negative view (up by 1 point).

Russia remains the fifth most-negatively viewed country in the survey—the same ranking it held in 2014. Of the 19 countries surveyed in 2017 (including Russia), 13 lean negatively in their opinion of Russia, two are divided, and four lean positively.

English-speaking NATO countries, including the United Kingdom, continue to hold very negative perceptions of Russia, and these views have deteriorated since 2014. British respondents are the most negative towards Russia of all the countries surveyed, with unfavourable opinion at 74 per cent (up by 10 points), while positive attitudes have fallen by seven points to 21 per cent. In the US, more than seven in ten hold a negative opinion (72%, up by 8 points), and just 16 per cent hold a positive opinion (down by 7 points). Opinion is similar in Canada, where negative ratings have increased by nine points to 71 per cent, while positive ratings have decreased by eight points to 18 per cent. Australia follows this trend as well, with an eight-point rise in negative views to two-thirds (67%), and an equal fall in positive views to just over one-fifth (22%). In all of these countries, negative views are at historically high levels, with the proportion of positive views at its lowest point since tracking began in 2005.

The trend among NATO members in continental Europe is similar, with negative opinion in France near its highest level since 2005 at 71 per cent, and reaching a new high in Spain (63%, up by 5 points). In Germany, while the proportion of negative ratings has dropped from 67 per cent to 47 per cent, only 6 per cent of respondents consider Russia’s influence in the world to be positive (down by 15 points).This is the smallest positive proportion in any of the nations polled. Greece is the only European country that sees Russian influence positively, with almost half (48%) having a positive opinion, and just one-fifth (21%) holding a negative opinion.

Negative views increased the most in Turkey of all the countries surveyed, surging 21 points from 33 to 54 per cent since 2014, while positive attitudes have fallen by eight points to 28 per cent. 2014 was the only year surveyed when Turkish opinion towards Russia was not predominately negative.

Views of Russia have also deteriorated in countries outside of NATO, particularly in Latin America. Divided in 2014 (30% negative vs. 34% positive), opinion in Peru is now leaning negatively, with a 14-point rise in unfavourable ratings (to 44%), while the proportion of positive ratings has remained fairly stable. In Brazil, negative opinion has also strengthened, with half holding unfavourable views (50%, up by 7 points), while just one-third report positive views (30%, down by 5 points). Mexican attitudes have soured as well, with a 13-point rise in negative opinion to 42 per cent, and an unchanged proportion of positive ratings (37%).

Looking at the more positive side, China holds the most favourable view of Russia of all the countries surveyed, with positive opinion surging by 19 points from 55 per cent in 2014 to almost three-quarters in 2017 (74%), and negative views holding stable at 18 per cent. In India, opinion is also more favourable, driven by a drop in negative views to 19 per cent (down by 11 points), while positive views have remained relatively stable at 40 per cent. In both Pakistan and Indonesia, views remain generally negative but less so than in 2014, with the proportion of respondents reporting negative views decreasing to 30 per cent and 38 per cent, respectively (down from 47% and 49% in 2014). Unfavourable views of Russia among Pakistanis are now at their lowest level since tracking began in 2010.

Finally, in the two countries surveyed in Africa, views have warmed, shifting from being generally negative in 2014 to being divided in 2017. About four in ten in Kenya (38%) and Nigeria (42%) now consider Russia’s influence in the world to be positive, following increases in favourable ratings of nine and 12 points respectively. Meanwhile, the proportion of negative ratings stands at 39 per cent in both countries.

 


 

 

Germany

Germany

Perceptions of German influence in the world continue to be very positive and stable overall, with three in five holding positive views (59%, up by 1 point since 2014) and just one in five expressing a negative opinion (21%, also up by 1 point since 2014).

In terms of the proportion of positive ratings received, Germany is the second most-positively viewed country after Canada, dropping from first place in 2014. Of the 19 countries surveyed (including Germany), 15 hold generally positive views of German influence, two are split (Russia and Pakistan), and two lean negatively (Turkey and Greece).

Perceptions of German influence are varied in Europe. The UK has the most positive view, with 84 per cent reporting a positive opinion (stable, a proportion it shares with China) and 14 per cent reporting a negative view (up by 5 points). Figures are similar in France, with a stable proportion of positive opinion (79%) and just 17 per cent leaning unfavourably (but up by 6 points since 2014). Spanish attitudes, though less favourable than in the UK and France, have bounced back, improving considerably since 2014 when, for the first time, they did not lean strongly positive. Negative opinion has softened significantly since, falling from 40 per cent to 26 per cent, while positive perceptions have increased from 44 per cent to 56 per cent. In contrast to other European nations, Greek opinion is unfavourable. Greece is the most negative of all the countries surveyed, with half posting unfavourable ratings (50%) and only three in ten (29%) having a positive impression of German influence.

In the Americas, stable majorities of about seven in ten report positive views in Canada (73%), and the US (70%), with low, near-stable figures for negative opinion at 15 per cent in Canada and 17 per cent in the US. Perceptions are also favourable in Latin America. Opinion in Brazil remains stable at about two-thirds (63%) positive and one-fifth (18%) negative. In Mexico, positive attitudes have increased to over half (54%, up by 11 points), while unfavourable perceptions have remained largely unchanged (25%). Opinion is also generally positive in Peru (45% positive, stable), but the proportion of negative ratings has slightly increased from 22 per cent to 28 per cent since 2014.

Sentiment towards Germany in Africa remains positive. The mood among Nigerians has continued to warm, with 71 per cent having positive perceptions (up by 8 points), and only 16 per cent holding negative views (down by 7 points). Figures are similar in Kenya, with 64 per cent reporting positive views and 19 per cent reporting negative views.

The largest increase in favourable views of Germany is seen in China, where the proportion of respondents with a positive opinion has doubled since 2014 to 84 per cent, while the proportion holding a negative opinion has fallen from 22 per cent to 13 per cent. These are the highest levels of Chinese positive opinion of Germany yet recorded in this survey, and Chinese respondents now share with the UK the most positive opinion of Germany of all countries surveyed. Views in Australia remain strongly positive, with almost four in five having a positive opinion of German influence (79%, though this proportion has slipped 7 points) and only 10 per cent reporting a negative view (stable).

In India, favourable views are also at their highest level since tracking began in 2008, with 40 per cent having a positive attitude (up by 8 points)—more than double the proportion of negative ratings (17%, down by 9 points). Indonesians also continue to express generally positive views, but this opinion is less decisive than before, with drops of five and eight points in positive and negative ratings respectively (now 48% vs. 20%). Opinion in Pakistan has deteriorated, shifting from being narrowly positive in 2014 (35% positive vs. 27% negative) to being divided in 2017 (21% positive vs 20% negative), with over half of Pakistani respondents undecided in their opinion.

In opposition to this very favourable global trend, opinion of Germany has taken a negative turn in Russia and Turkey since 2014, when opinion was positive overall in both countries. Turkey has seen the largest increase in the proportion of respondents reporting negative views, from 24 to 45 per cent (up by 21 points), and positive views have fallen by 11 points to 36 per cent. In Russia, the proportion of negative ratings has more than doubled, from 12 to 29 per cent, and positive views have plummeted from 57 to 31 per cent (down by 26 points). This is the least favourable view of Germany that Russia has held since tracking began in 2008, and the first time that Russian opinion is divided towards Germany.

 


 

Canada

Canada

Views of Canada’s influence in the world have warmed strongly since 2014, with positive opinion jumping from 56 to 61 per cent on average in the 17 countries surveyed in 2014 and 2017. Only 15 per cent feel negatively about Canada’s influence, by far the lowest proportion in the survey.

As a result, Canada is the most-positively viewed country, moving up by from second place in 2014. Of the 19 countries surveyed (including Canada), all lean positively in their opinions of Canada’s influence except Pakistan, which is divided. In many countries, favourable views have never been stronger while this question has been tracked.

Canada’s influence is viewed most positively in the United Kingdom of all the countries surveyed, with nearly all British respondents reporting a favourable opinion (94%, up by 9 points since 2014). Similarly, 92 per cent of French respondents hold positive views of Canada’s influence (up by 5 points), second only to the UK. In both nations, this is the highest level of favourable opinion since tracking began in 2005, and negative views are also at record lows (5%, stable). Germany shows an increased positive attitude towards Canada as well, with favourable ratings rising by ten points to 63 per cent, while negative attitudes have become virtually non-existent, dropping from 20 to just 2 per cent. Strong majorities in Greece and Spain also lean favourably (70% and 59%, respectively) with marginal proportions reporting unfavourable views (4% and 9%, respectively).

Opinion is also very positive in English-speaking nations. In Australia, positive views have increased by eight points to 91 per cent. In the US, favourable opinion remains stable at 87 per cent. In each country, negative views of Canada’s influence are very low, at just 5 per cent.

In peripheral Europe, a plurality view Canada’s influence positively in Turkey, but opinion has become more polarised since 2014, with 43 per cent holding positive views (up by 10 points), while the proportion holding negative views has surged from 15 to 36 per cent. In Russia, positive views have declined by the largest margin of all of the countries surveyed, dropping from 47 to 36 per cent, while negative attitudes have remained fairly stable at 15 per cent. Though views among Russians remain positive overall, they are at their least favourable since tracking began in 2005.

In Latin America, Mexican and Brazilian views are very similar. Of all the countries surveyed, positive opinion has increased the most in NAFTA partner Mexico, surging by 27 points to reach 69 per cent, while negative opinion has softened from 21 to 12 per cent. In Brazil, positive opinion has risen by 21 points to 71 per cent, while negative opinion has fallen by 14 points to 12 per cent. In both nations, attitudes are at their most favourable since tracking began in 2005. In contrast, opinion among Peruvians is less positive, and has deteriorated somewhat since 2014. Positive attitudes have decreased by six points to 42 per cent, while negative attitudes have increased by nine points to 23 per cent.

Opinions of Canada’s influence are very similar in the two African nations surveyed. A stable majority of 55 per cent among Nigerians views Canada positively, more than double the proportion of those who hold negative perceptions (25%). Attitudes are similar in Kenya, with 54 per cent reporting positive views (up from 46% in 2014) and a stable proportion taking a negative view (23%).

Positive opinion is at a historic high in China, with favourable ratings jumping from 63 to 82 per cent and a small, decreasing proportion of negative ratings (11%, down by 6 points). Positive attitudes have also increased in India, climbing to 37 per cent (up by 6 points), while negative views have fallen by five points to 16 per cent. Bucking this trend, Pakistan and Indonesia have seen drops in the proportion holding positive opinions of Canada’s influence. In Pakistan, the mood towards Canada has shifted among Pakistanis from being narrowly positive in 2014 (36% positive vs 25% negative) to being more divided in 2017 (26% positive vs 30% negative)—though 2014 was the only year when opinion was positive overall since tracking began in 2010. Positive opinion in Indonesia has become less solid, dropping eight points to 32 per cent, though this still exceeds negative views, which are largely unchanged at 26 per cent.

 


 

The European Union

EU

Views of the European Union’s influence have improved since 2014, with 48 per cent of respondents across the 18 tracking countries polled in both 2014 and 2017 having a positive opinion of the institution (up slightly from 45% in 2014). Meanwhile, the proportion expressing negative views is stable at 30 per cent.

When weighed against the 16 individual nations assessed in the poll, the EU ranks as the sixth most-positively viewed. This rank is unchanged from 2014. Of the 19 countries polled in 2017, 14 lean positively in their views of the EU, three are divided (Greece, Pakistan, and Indonesia), and two tend to a negative opinion (Russia and Turkey).

Within the EU itself, the proportion of positive ratings for the broader organisation has remained stable. Two-thirds of French respondents (66%) consider the EU to have a positive influence in the world, more than double the proportion of those who rate the institution negatively (28%). These figures are not much changed from 2014, and the French continue to see the EU in the most positive light measured among surveyed EU members. Pluralities in both Germany and Spain offer favourable ratings of the EU (49% and 44%, respectively), and overall opinion has grown more favourable since 2014, with the proportion stating a negative opinion decreasing from 31 to 19 per cent in Germany, and from 32 to 26 per cent in Spain. Despite having voted in favour of Brexit in 2016, a majority of 55 per cent in the UK continues to see the EU favourably. Negative opinion, however, is high (but stable) at 42 per cent—the third most hostile rating out of all 19 countries surveyed, after Turkey and Russia. Greece is the only EU member country surveyed that does not lean positively in its attitudes towards the EU, with opinion clearly divided: just over a third of Greeks offer positive ratings of the EU (35%), while 36 per cent rate it negatively.

In peripheral Europe, views have shifted sharply in Russia and Turkey, and these two countries now have the most unfavourable surveyed perceptions of the EU. Negative views in Russia have doubled from 23 to 48 per cent since 2014, while positive views have fallen by a similar margin to 14 per cent (down by 23 points). Positive opinion of the EU in Russia is at its lowest level since tracking began in 2006, and 2017 is the first year when Russian opinion has been predominately negative. Turkey also displays a very large increase in negative opinion, which has nearly doubled from 25 to 48 per cent, while the proportion of positive ratings has remained almost static at 37 per cent.

In North America, 70 per cent of Canadians see the EU’s influence as positive (up by 6 points), while negative views are low and stable at 20 per cent—Canada has the most favourable opinion of the EU of all the countries surveyed. In the US, views are little changed and generally positive, with a comfortable majority expressing favourable views (56%), while negative opinion continues to hover near thirty per cent.

In the two African countries surveyed, opinions of the EU continue to be largely positive, and have recovered from a low point in 2014 in Nigeria, as positive ratings have increased by 12 points to 60 per cent, and negative opinions have fallen by 14 points to 23 per cent. Views of the EU are unchanged and favourable in Kenya, with over half (56%) expressing a positive view, and one-quarter speaking negatively (24%).

Latin American views of the EU remain generally positive, but have evolved in different directions since 2014. Favourable opinion in Brazil has grown stronger, with positive views increasing slightly (by 5 points) to 54 per cent, and negative views decreasing by the same amount to 26 per cent. The mood in Mexico has warmed more strongly, with over half of Mexicans now having a positive perception of the EU’s world influence (54%, up by 17 points), while a quarter still hold a negative view (23%, stable). On the other hand, opinion among Peruvians has deteriorated, with positive views declining from 51 per cent to 45 per cent, while negative views have gone up by 14 points, from 17 to 31 per cent.

In Asia, views of the EU are diverse, with China and Australia the most favourable in their opinion of the EU’s influence. While perceptions among Australians have remained fairly stable (57% positive vs. 34% negative), Chinese opinion has shifted greatly since 2014, from being divided (32% vs 34%) to strongly positive in 2017. Chinese respondents have reported the largest increase in positive views among all the countries surveyed, with favourable opinion growing from one-third to two-thirds (66%)—now ranking second only to Canada, and tied with France. Negative views of the EU have decreased in China by 8 points, and stand at 26 per cent.

Indian perceptions are largely unchanged and remain mildly favourable, with a narrow plurality leaning positive (31%) opposed by 26 per cent holding negative views. In neighbouring Pakistan, opinion is divided, with the proportion of Pakistanis seeing the EU in an unfavourable light decreasing from 39 to 26 per cent, while positive ratings have remained stable at a similar level (23%). This is the first year since tracking began in 2010 that Pakistani opinion towards the EU has not been predominately negative. On the other hand, Indonesian opinion has cooled, shifting from leaning positively in 2014 (40% positive vs 33% negative) to being divided in 2017 (29% positive vs 33% negative), following an 11-point drop in positive views.

 


 

The United Kingdom

UK

 

Views of the UK’s influence in the world have deteriorated sharply since 2014, though they remain largely favourable overall. On average, across the 17 countries surveyed both in 2014 and 2017, half of respondents hold positive views of the UK (51%, down by 4 points), while the proportion holding negative attitudes has gone up by two points to 25 per cent.

As a consequence of these cooling global perceptions, the UK has dropped to fifth place in the ranking of most-positively viewed countries in the survey, compared to its rank of third in 2014. Overall, among the 19 countries surveyed in 2017 (including the UK itself), 14 lean positively in their opinion, and five lean negatively.

Opinions about the UK are very diverse in continental Europe. As in 2014, France is the most favourable, although this feeling has become more attenuated, with positive views falling by nine points to 63 per cent, while negative views have increased by 12 points to 32 per cent. Greeks also view the UK favourably, with two in five (42%) having a positive opinion and one in five (22%) having a negative opinion. German opinion has become more tentative since 2014, though remaining generally positive: both positive and negative ratings have dropped by 16 points, to 35 per cent and 18 per cent, respectively. A plurality of 47 per cent takes no clear stance on whether or not the UK’s influence in the world is positive. In Spain, opinion has shifted from being somewhat positive in 2014 to being negative this year. Positive ratings have fallen from 41 to 34 per cent, while negative perceptions have gone up from 36 to 42 per cent. Unfavourable views are now at their highest level in Spain since tracking began in 2005, and this is the first year of the survey in which Spanish opinion of the UK is predominately negative.

Perceptions of the UK in English-speaking nations remain very positive. In the US, views are the most favourable among all the countries surveyed, and are largely unchanged from 2014. Almost four in five Americans (79%) see the UK’s influence as positive, and just ten per cent disapprove of it. Favourable opinion has also remained high and stable in Australia, with three-quarters (76%) posting positive ratings and only 15 per cent posting negative ones. On the other hand, positive attitudes have softened in Canada, with favourable views decreasing to 73 per cent (down by 7 points), and negative ratings doubling to 18 per cent.

In Africa, favourable attitudes have strengthened in Nigeria, with positive views up by nine points to 76 per cent, and negative views down by seven points to 15 per cent. In Kenya, seven in ten (69%) assess the UK’s influence positively, with just two in ten (20%) reporting negative opinions. However, this negative proportion has doubled since 2014, and is now at a historically high level for this country.

In Asia, attitudes towards the UK have become generally less decisive, as both positive and negative views have decreased, with the exception of China. Positive views have increased the most in China of all the countries polled, surging 34 points to 73 per cent since 2014, while negative views have fallen by seven points to 19 per cent. This is the most positive Chinese assessment of British influence since tracking began in 2005. In Indonesia, a majority remains favourable towards the UK, but both positive and negative ratings have decreased by eight points, to 51 per cent and 18 per cent, respectively. This growing indecision is much more apparent in Pakistan, where positive opinion has halved to 20 per cent, while negative opinion has decreased by six points to 29 per cent. Pakistan, which expressed divided opinion in 2014, is now sceptical about the UK’s influence in the world. The pattern of diminishing certainty is also present in India, where positive ratings have decreased by ten points to 33 per cent, and negative ratings have diminished by seven points to 20 per cent.

Perceptions in Latin America are mixed. Favourable views have increased in Mexico, and are now historically high at 53 per cent (up by 13 points since 2014), while negative opinion is relatively stable at 22 per cent. In contrast, views have taken a negative turn in Peru and Brazil. In Peru, a stable plurality remains positive towards the UK (41%), but negative views have increased from 21 to 29 per cent. In Brazil, perceptions are now somewhat negative, with two in five (39%) reporting a negative opinion, compared to 2014’s proportion of one-quarter (25%). At the same, favourable opinion has fallen 12 points, from 45 per cent to 33 per cent.

 


 

Japan

Japan

Views of Japan’s influence are positive overall and have improved strongly since 2014, halting an abrupt deterioration that began in 2013. On average, across the 18 tracking countries surveyed in both 2014 and 2017, positive perceptions have increased six points to 56 per cent of respondents, while negative perceptions have decreased by four points to 24 per cent.

Japan is now the third most-positively viewed country, an improvement of one place compared to 2014. Of the 19 countries surveyed, all countries hold a positive opinion of Japan’s influence, with the exceptions of Spain (which is divided) and China (which is strongly negative).

Perceptions of Japan among its Asian neighbours are varied. Australia is the most favourable of all the surveyed countries towards Japan, with 78 per cent of Australians posting positive ratings (up by 19 points), while negative opinion has fallen to 17 per cent (down by 12 points). Indonesia is also favourably minded, but less so than in 2014, with 57 per cent seeing Japan’s influence as positive (a drop of 13 points). The proportion of Indonesians who see Japan’s influence as negative is relatively stable at 17 per cent. In 2014, views in both India and China were at their least favourable point since tracking began in 2006, but they have improved this year. In India, positive opinion has jumped from 27 to 45 per cent, while negative opinion has fallen from 29 per cent to 17 per cent. Divided in their attitudes in 2014, Indians now lean positively in their views of Japan’s role in the world. Pakistanis share similar views, although the proportion of undecided respondents is higher: positive opinion sits at 38 per cent (down by 8 points), while negative opinion is stable at 20 percent, and 42 per cent are undecided. Attitudes in China continue to be the least favourable of all of the countries polled, but negative opinion is lower than in 2014, having fallen 15 points from 90 to 75 per cent. The proportion of Chinese who see Japan’s influence as positive has increased by 17 points, to 22 per cent.

In Europe, views are the most positive in France and the UK. In France, positive opinion has strengthened, growing by 16 points to 74 per cent, and negative views have fallen by 13 points to 21 per cent. British positive attitudes remain unchanged at 65 per cent, while negative attitudes have increased by six points to 30 per cent. In Greece and Germany, similar proportions view Japan’s influence positively (52% and 50%, respectively), but the mood in Germany has gotten much warmer, with positive attitudes surging by 22 points, and negative attitudes dropping 33 points to just 13 per cent. Though 2013 and 2014 saw the most unfavourable German attitudes towards Japan since tracking began in 2006, attitudes have strongly reversed, and opinion is now at its most favourable. Spain, however, bucks this generally favourable picture. Unfavourable views of Japanese influence have gone up by six points to 36 per cent, while positive views have declined by seven points, to 36 per cent. This increasingly polarised view has shifted Spain from leaning positively in 2014 to being of divided opinion now.

In peripheral Europe, one in two among Turkish respondents views Japan positively (50%, up by 10 points), but the proportion seeing it negatively has also risen (32%, up by 14 points). Russian perceptions are stable and generally positive, with favourable views at just under half (45%), and negative views rising slightly to 16 per cent.

In North America, favourable views of Japan’s influence have increased considerably in Canada, which now has the second most favourable attitude of all the countries surveyed (following Australia). Positive opinion has increased by 19 points to 77 per cent, and negative opinion has dropped by 18 points to 12 per cent. Favourable attitudes towards Japan are now more prevalent than in any previous survey year. Perceptions of Japan’s influence among US respondents are stable, with two-thirds (65%) holding positive views and roughly a quarter (23%) holding negative views.

Views of Japan’s influence are also favourable in Latin America. In Brazil, positive perceptions remain stable at 70 per cent, and negative perceptions have fallen slightly, to 15 per cent. Positive opinion in Mexico has increased significantly, from 38 to 59 per cent, while negative views are steady at 23 per cent. Opinion is similar in Peru, with positive ratings largely unchanged at 56 per cent, and negative ratings climbing slightly, up by six points to 25 per cent.

In Africa, Kenyans and Nigerians hold almost identical views of Japanese influence, with 58 and 57 per cent reporting positive views, respectively. However, this proportion is up in Kenya (by 13 points), whereas it has decreased by 15 points in Nigeria. Nigerians are also more likely to offer negative opinions compared to 2014 (24%, up by 15 points), while this proportion is quite stable in Kenya (at 22%).

 


 

Pakistan

Pakistan

Views of Pakistan’s influence remain largely unfavourable overall, though they have improved since 2014 following a historic low point in a number of countries. On average, across the 17 tracking countries polled in both 2014 and 2017, 58 per cent of respondents have a negative opinion of Pakistan’s influence in the world (down by 2 points since 2014), while 18 per cent view this influence favourably (up from 16% in 2014).

Pakistan is the third most-negatively viewed country in the survey, an improvement from its position in 2014, when it tied with Iran at the bottom. Of the 19 countries surveyed, 15 lean negatively in their perceptions of Pakistani influence, two are divided (Kenya and China), and two lean positively (Indonesia, and Pakistan itself).

Among the countries surveyed, India takes the darkest view of Pakistan’s influence, and this bleak view is now at its most negative since tracking began in 2008. Negative views of Pakistan in India have surged by 36 points to 85 per cent in 2017, the largest such increase among all of the countries surveyed. Just 5 per cent of Indians see Pakistani influence in a positive light, a decline of 12 points. In other parts of Asia, however, attitudes have improved. A stable plurality remains favourably minded in Indonesia (38%), with negative perceptions falling 9 points to 22 per cent. In China, views have warmed substantially, shifting from being largely negative in 2014 to being divided in 2017 following a 26-point increase in positive opinion to 47 per cent, with negative views largely unchanged at 44 per cent. This warm Chinese opinion is the most positive view among the surveyed countries, and matches Pakistan’s own opinion of itself. Australians, however, remain overwhelmingly negative in their opinion, though less so than in 2014. Negative opinion has dropped by 14 points to 63 per cent, while positive opinion has climbed slightly to 18 per cent.

Opinion in Russia is generally negative, but the proportion of Russians offering negative views has decreased by 13 points to 40 per cent since 2014, when negative perceptions were at the highest level since tracking began in 2008. Positive opinion, however, remains very low, at just 10 per cent. In Muslim Turkey, public opinion is certainly warmer, with almost three in ten (29%) reporting a positive view of Pakistani influence—but a higher (and increasing) proportion of Turkish respondents continues to offer a negative opinion (48%, up by 7 points).

In EU countries, attitudes towards Pakistan remain predominately unfavourable, although some overall improvement is seen. Although almost no Germans view Pakistan’s influence positively (1%, the lowest proportion of all the countries surveyed), negative attitudes have decreased more than in any other country since 2014, dropping 33 points from 80 to 47 per cent. A majority of German respondents (52%) now express no solid opinion about Pakistani influence. In the UK, negative views have fallen by nine points to 62 per cent, while positive views have increased to 28 per cent (up by 10 points). In France, negative opinion has decreased slightly, dropping by five points to 72 per cent, while positive opinion has increased by six points to 16 per cent. In Spain, negative attitudes have also decreased, dropping 12 points to 59 per cent, and are now the least negative since tracking began in 2008. Still, just five per cent of Spanish respondents have a favourable view of Pakistan’s role in the world. Figures are similar in Greece, where four per cent view Pakistan’s influence positively, and three in five (58%) view it negatively.

In North America, perceptions of Pakistan’s influence have also taken a less negative turn since 2014, when unfavourable views of Pakistan were at their highest since tracking began in 2008 in both the US and Canada. Negative attitudes among Americans and Canadians are reported by strong majorities, yet not as a substantially so as in 2014 (71%, down by 14 points in the US; 67%, down by 12 points in Canada). Positive views of Pakistan amount to 14 per cent in both countries (which represents a 9-point gain in the US).

On the other hand, negative opinion continues to rise in Latin American countries, reaching historical highs. In Brazil, negative opinion has increased by six points to 81 per cent (second only to India), while positive opinion remains largely unchanged and extremely low (5%). Mexican views have also deteriorated since 2014, accounted for by a 21-point increase in negative ratings to almost two-thirds (65%) and slightly declining positive opinion (now at 10%). A similar pattern is seen in Peru, where negative views among Peruvians have gone up by 12 points to 59 per cent, and positive views have remained relatively unchanged at 9 per cent.

Views of Pakistani influence differ in the two African countries surveyed. Opinion has become more negative in Nigeria, where positive views have halved to 19 per cent since 2014, and negative views have increased by 16 points to 62 per cent (the most negative impression of Pakistan among Nigerians since tracking began in 2008). In Kenya, however, opinion has taken a marked turn for the better, shifting from leaning negative in 2014 (23% positive vs 45% negative) to being divided in 2017 (36% positive vs 35% negative).

 


 

India

India

Global perceptions of India’s influence are narrowly negative in 2017, and have remained fairly stable since 2014. On average across the 16 tracking countries surveyed in both 2014 and 2017, over one-third of respondents (37%, down by 1 point) have a positive view of India’s influence in the world. This proportion is slightly outnumbered by those who report negative views (39%, stable).

India ties for ninth place out of 17 (with South Korea) in the ranking of positively-viewed nations: in 2014, they were tied at eleventh place. Of the 18 countries surveyed in 2017 (including India), nine lean positively in their views of India, eight lean negatively, and one is divided (Canada).

Attitudes towards India’s influence are diverse in Asia, with increasingly favourable opinions in Australia and Indonesia, and increasingly unfavourable opinions in China and Pakistan. In a parallel to India’s opinion of Pakistan, Pakistani views towards India have taken a negative turn since 2014, becoming the most unfavourable since tracking began in 2010. While negative sentiment is largely unchanged at three in five (62%, the least favourable of all the countries surveyed), positive opinion has halved to 11 per cent. Negative opinion has also surged in China, from 35 to 56 per cent, but positive ratings are also up (35%, a rise of 8 points). In contrast, Australian opinion has warmed, shifting from being divided in 2014 to leaning positively in 2017. Almost half of Australians (49%, up by 5 points) hold positive views of India, while negative views have fallen from 46 per cent to about one-third (34%). Indonesians are also very favourable towards India: 50 per cent report positive views (stable), while 18 per cent express a negative opinion (18%, down by 6 points).

North American views are stable. Canadian views are divided, with positive and negative opinions largely unchanged at 41 per cent and 44 per cent, respectively. In the US, however, nearly half (49%) continue to have a favourable perception of Indian influence, while 37 per cent report a negative opinion.

In the two Latin American countries surveyed, views diverge. Mexican attitudes have improved since 2014, with an increase of 16 points in positive views to 42 per cent (the largest increase of all countries surveyed), and the proportion expressing negative opinion relatively unchanged at 33 per cent. Mexican opinion has thus moved from leaning negatively to leaning positively. On the other hand, Brazilian opinion has taken the opposite course. Slightly positive in 2014 (41% positive vs. 36% negative), opinion now leans negatively following a severe drop in positive opinion (down by 18 points, to 23%), and a surge in unfavourable ratings, which rose from 36 to 57 per cent (a historical high since tracking began).

In Europe, the UK has the most favourable view of India’s influence of all countries surveyed, and is the only country in Europe to have a generally positive opinion. Divided in 2014, the British opinion has shifted noticeably: a majority of 56 per cent give India a positive rating of (up by 11 points), while 38 per cent hold negative views (down by 8 points). In Germany, negative views have plummeted from 68 per cent in 2014 (when negative opinion was at its highest since tracking began in 2006) to just 33 per cent in 2017. However, positive views have also decreased, falling by 15 points to a negligible 1 per cent, and leaving a majority of Germans undecided in their view of India. Negative attitudes in Spain have fallen 15 points to 35 per cent, while positive views remain stable at about one in five (23%). In Greece, nearly three in ten (27%) see India’s influence negatively, while two in ten (19%) see it positively. Indecision on this question is very high in Spain and Greece, with pluralities of 42 per cent and 54 per cent respectively unwilling to take a clear stance. French opinion remains negative and relatively unchanged since 2014, with unfavourable views at roughly half (53%), and positive views at two in five (39%).

In peripheral Europe, attitudes in Turkey have soured since 2014, shifting from being divided in 2014 to leaning negatively in 2017. This change is owing to a 15-point increase in negative views, to 44 per cent, while positive views have remained stable at about a third (32%). In Russia, opinion is largely unchanged and favourable: a plurality express positive views (41%), while only 10 per cent post negative ratings. Nearly half of Russian respondents, however, are undecided in their views of India (49%).

Opinions in the two African nations surveyed continue to lean positively. In Nigeria, however, perceptions have cooled since 2014 and are becoming more polarised. The proportion of positive ratings is at its the lowest level since 2010, following a 17-point drop to 47 per cent. Negative attitudes have climbed 17 points, to 39 per cent. Both positive and negative views are stable in Kenya, at 48 per cent and 26 per cent, respectively.

 


 

Iran

Iran

Iran’s influence continues to be perceived very negatively in almost all of the 18 countries surveyed in both 2014 and 2017, with average proportions of 61 per cent expressing a negative opinion (the same as in 2014), and just 15 per cent expressing a positive opinion (down by 1 point).

Iran is the most-negatively viewed country in the survey. Among the surveyed nations, only respondents in Pakistan see Iran in a (mildly) positive light. Responses in Indonesia are divided, but all the other surveyed countries express a negative opinion of Iran’s influence in the world.

Perceptions of Iran’s influence have improved in Russia, with a decline in negative opinion from almost half (49%, the harshest negative ratings of Iran since tracking began in 2006) to just one-third (35%). Positive opinion, however, remains very low (and stable) at 12 per cent. By contrast, opinion in neighbouring Turkey has worsened, with unfavourable attitudes jumping from 46 to 62 per cent, and the proportion of positive ratings falling five points to 19 per cent.

While opinion remains very negative in Europe, it has improved a little since 2014. In Germany, negative responses have fallen the most in all of the countries polled, dropping by 33 points to 52 per cent. Although these are the least negative German views of Iran since tracking began in 2006, favourable opinion remains extremely low (1%, stable). Germans are increasingly undecided towards Iran, with 47 per cent not expressing a solid opinion either way on this question. In France, negative opinion has also dropped, falling from 84 to 72 per cent since 2014, while positive views have gone up by nine points to 17 per cent. The trend is similar in the UK, with negative views at 75 per cent (down by 8 points) and positive views at 17 per cent (up by 10 points). Views in Spain have remained steady, and are the most negative in Europe: three-quarters of Spanish respondents (76%) see Iran in a negative light, and just 4 per cent see it in a positive one. Greek opinion of Iran’s influence is the least negative in Europe, although a majority still disapproves (51%), with just 8 per cent expressing a positive opinion.

Views towards Iran in North America, although slightly improved since 2014 (especially in the US), are still among the most negative surveyed. More than eight in ten Americans have a negative opinion of Iranian influence (82%, down by 6 points), while one in ten offers a positive opinion (9%, stable). In Canada, negative views have fallen by ten points to 73 per cent, while positive views have somewhat increased to 11 per cent (up by 5 points). These results represent an improvement from 2014, when unfavourable opinion in both countries was at its highest level since tracking began in 2006.

In the three Latin American countries polled, negative perceptions of Iran’s influence are the highest they have been since tracking began. Brazilians have very unfavourable views of Iran: as in the US, 82 per cent express negative views, but even fewer than in the US (just 5%) express positive ones (both stable proportions). In Peru, negative perceptions have jumped 19 points from about half (46%) to almost two-thirds (65%), as positive views have remained stable at 10 per cent. The picture is very similar in Mexico, where negative opinion has risen by 15 points to 64 per cent against low positive ratings (13%, stable).

In the surveyed countries in Africa, perceptions have soured in Nigeria, but have improved in Kenya. The proportion of Nigerians holding negative views has increased to 68 per cent (up by 14 points)—the highest level since tracking began in 2006—while positive views have decreased from 29 to 15 per cent. In contrast, Kenyan negative opinion has fallen by 8 points to 54 per cent, while positive opinion has remained relatively stable at 20 per cent.

In Asia, no clear trend connects the surveyed countries. In Pakistan, the only country with a plurality leaning positively towards Iran’s influence, the mood has nonetheless cooled significantly as the proportion of positive ratings has collapsed from 51 to 30 per cent, while negative views hover at around one in four (23%). In Indonesia, opinion remains divided, with about a third expressing positive views (33%, down by 7 points), and a similar proportion expressing negative views (30%, down by 5 points). China shows the largest increase in negative opinion towards Iran of all the surveyed countries, with an increase of 25 points to 65 per cent. This is the highest level of negative Chinese opinion toward Iran since tracking began in 2006. Nonetheless, positive opinion has increased by seven points (to 25%). In India, perceptions of Iran have also cooled, although not to the same extent. Indian negative opinion has increased by six points to 43 per cent, while positive opinion has held stable at 22 per cent. Views among Australians are similar to those in other English-speaking nations and are the most negative in Asia: more than seven in ten state a negative attitude (72%, down by 6 points), while one in ten speak favourably of Iran (11%, stable).

 


 

South Africa

South Africa

Global opinion of South Africa’s influence is narrowly positive in 2017, although less so than in 2014. On average, across the 18 tracking countries surveyed in both 2014 and 2017, 36 per cent of respondents hold favourable attitudes towards South Africa, down by 3 points since 2014. Negative views are expressed by 33 per cent, with an equal proportion undecided (31%).

South Africa ranks eleventh out of 17 in the list of most-positively rated countries, a fall of two places since 2014. Of the 19 countries surveyed in 2017, eight lean positively towards South Africa, six lean negatively, and five are divided in their opinions.

Perceptions of South Africa in the two African countries surveyed remain largely positive. Two-thirds of Kenyans (67%) express a favourable view, a drop of four points since 2014 but still the highest proportion in all the countries surveyed. Meanwhile, negative ratings have gone up six points, to 18 per cent. In Nigeria, a majority remains positive, but by a smaller margin than in 2014, with favour dropping by 12 points to 53 per cent—the lowest value since tracking began in 2009. The proportion expressing a negative opinion has increased by ten points, to 27 per cent.

In Asia, Indians report the most favourable opinion of South Africa since tracking began. A plurality of 37 per cent think well of South African influence, while negative views have fallen by seven points to 16 per cent; half, however, take no clear position on this question (47%). Australians are divided in their opinion (42% positive vs. 38% negative), having shifted from leaning negatively in 2014 due to an eight-point decline in negative ratings. Opinion has become less conclusive in Pakistan and Indonesia, and is divided in both countries. In Pakistan, both positive and negative attitudes have decreased, with approval dropping by nine points to one-fifth (20%), and disapproval slipping by eight points to a similar proportion (19%). A majority of Pakistanis express no clear opinion. Similarly, in Indonesia, negative views have decreased by 10 points to one-quarter (26%), while positive views are largely unchanged at three in ten (29%). The Chinese, in contrast, have become more polarised in their opinion, as both positive and negative opinions have increased: positive attitudes have gone up by 27 points to 49 per cent, while negative attitudes have increased by eight points to 42 per cent.

European nations express diverse views of South Africa’s influence. In France, attitudes are largely unchanged and remain the most positive towards South Africa in Europe, with positive opinion at 55 per cent and negative opinion at 32 per cent. Opinion in the UK is stable and somewhat positive (48% positive vs. 42% negative). German opinion has changed sharply compared to 2014, when a majority held negative views. This disapproval has tumbled 40 points, to 19 per cent—but positive opinion has also fallen steeply, down by 14 points to 9 per cent. Fully 72 per cent of Germans state no strong opinion about South Africa’s role in the world. This pattern of vague opinion continues in Spain, where positive opinion stands at 20 per cent (down by 14 points), negative opinion is at 34 per cent (stable), and a large plurality (46%), expresses no strong opinion. Greece shows a similar pattern, with 19 per cent positive, 23 per cent negative, and 58 percent not stating a strong view.

In North America, attitudes towards South Africa are weakly positive, and quite stable. In the US, The proportion of positive and negative opinion remains stable in the US at 44 per cent, and 34 per cent hold a negative opinion (stable). Canadian views are very similar, with positive opinion at 41 per cent and negative opinion at 35 per cent (both stable).

Opinion in Latin American countries is at odds with North America, and negative overall. In Brazil, opinion has shifted strongly since 2014, from leaning positively to being strongly negative this year. The proportion of negative opinion among Brazilians has more than doubled to two-thirds (65%, the most unfavourable in all the countries surveyed), while positive views have fallen by 28 points to 19 per cent. In Peru, negative attitudes have risen as well, from 33 to 39 per cent, while positive ratings have remained stable at a quarter (26%). In both countries, this is the most unfavourable perception of South Africa since tracking began in 2010 and 2011, respectively. In Mexico, opinion has warmed from leaning negatively in 2014. While negative opinion remains stable at 38 per cent, positive views have increased by 13 points to a similar proportion (37%), leaving Mexican opinion divided overall.

 


 

Israel

Israel

 

Israel’s influence in the world continues to be viewed very negatively overall. On average, across the 18 tracking countries surveyed in both 2014 and 2017, half of respondents (50%) have a negative opinion, double the proportion holding a positive opinion (25%).

Global opinion has not changed dramatically since 2014, and Israel remains the fourth most-negatively viewed country out of the 17 countries in the ranking. Of the 19 countries participating in the survey in 2017, 15 lean negatively in their opinion of Israel’s influence, while four lean positively.

US opinion towards Israel is the most positive among the countries surveyed, and is at its most favourable level since tracking began in 2007, with almost six in ten reporting a positive opinion (59%, up by 7 points) and fewer than three in ten offering a negative opinion (28%, down by 8 points). Although attitudes have also improved in Canada, they remain generally unfavourable, with more than half of Canadians viewing Israel’s influence negatively (52%, stable), and a third viewing it positively (35%, up by 5 points).

Perceptions of Israel remain largely negative in Europe, although this negativity has softened since 2014. This is especially true in Germany, which reports the largest fall in negative opinion, dropping from two-thirds (67%) in 2014 to just over one-third (36%) in 2017. However, positive opinion remains extremely low at 7 per cent (the lowest rating in all of the countries surveyed). A similar pattern is seen in the UK, where negative views have fallen from 72 per cent to 66 per cent, and positive views have risen from 19 to 25 per cent. Opinion has also become more favourable in France, with negative views at 62 per cent and a seven-point increase in positive attitudes to 28 per cent. Spanish opinion is relatively unchanged from 2014 (60% negative vs. 11% positive). In Greece, one-fifth (19%) see Israel positively, but more than third (35%) express a negative view.

Among the countries polled, opinion of Israel is harshest in Turkey. Since 2014, Turkish negative ratings have surged 33 points to over three-quarters (77%), while positive views have fallen by 7 points to 10 per cent. In contrast, opinion has improved in Russia, with positive views increasing slightly (34%, up by 6 points), and negative views holding with little change at one-fifth (20%). Almost half of all Russians, however, express no strong opinion (46%).

In Africa, both surveyed countries lean positively towards Israeli influence. Kenya holds the second-most favourable view of Israel’s influence after the US, with 46 per cent (stable) expressing approval and 26 per cent (also stable) offering a negative opinion. Opinion in Nigeria, mostly negative in 2014 (33% positive vs. 46% negative), has flipped, with nearly half (45%) now seeing Israel positively, and fewer than four in ten (37%) now offering a negative view.

In Asia, attitudes towards Israel have moved in different trajectories, but remain negative overall. In China, positive opinion has seen the largest rise among the nations polled, increasing by 21 points to 34 per cent since 2014, when overall opinion was at its least favourable since 2007. Nonetheless, negative opinion has also increased 57 per cent (a rise of 8 points). Australians report similar figures, with positive ratings up by seven points to 31 per cent—a historical high in this survey—and negative ratings down by 11 points to 56 per cent. Both positive and negative opinion have declined in Pakistan, with the former decreasing by six points (to 10%) and the latter falling by 11 points to half (49%). This is the most favourable Pakistani position towards Israel since tracking began in 2007. In Indonesia, negative opinion has also fallen, although it remains high at 64 per cent (down by 11 points). Positive opinion is relatively unchanged, and low, at 9 per cent. In India, negative ratings are now at their highest level since tracking began (40%, up by 6 points since 2014), while positive opinion is stable at one in five (21%).

Views of Israel’s influence have deteriorated in Latin America. Mexico shows the second largest increase in negative opinion after Turkey, rising from 45 per cent to nearly two-thirds (63%), while positive opinion has remained low and quite stable at 16 per cent. The figures are similar in Brazil: 61 per cent hold negative views, and 16 per cent offer positive views (down by 5 points). Half of Peruvian respondents (50%, up by 9 points) offer a negative impression of Israel’s influence, while a fifth (20%, stable) hold a positive view. In Mexico and Peru, unfavourable perceptions are at their highest levels since tracking began in 2007.

 


 

North Korea

North Korea

Attitudes towards North Korea’s influence are very negative among the 18 countries surveyed in both 2014 and 2017, and have generally deteriorated. On average, three out of five respondents (59%, up by 3 points) express a negative opinion, and less than one-fifth (17%, down by 1 point) hold a positive opinion.

North Korea is ranked as the second most-negatively viewed country of out of the 17 tested, after Iran. Among the 19 countries surveyed in 2017, every single one sees North Korea’s influence in the world as negative. North Korea is the only country in the survey for which this is true.

US views of North Korea are especially negative, with almost nine in ten (88%) reporting a negative opinion of the Pyongyang regime, and just 5 per cent stating a favourable view. This is consistent with American opinion in 2014. In Canada, the picture is similar, with positive and negative opinions relatively unchanged from 2014 (10% positive vs. 81% negative).

The UK has one of the most negative opinions of North Korea among the nations polled, with nine in ten expressing disapproval (89%, up by 6 points), and just 7 per cent offering a positive opinion (stable). Perceptions have also deteriorated in France, with a six-point increase in negative opinion to 85 per cent, and stable positive opinion at 9 per cent. Unfavourable views are at their highest level here since tracking began in 2007. Attitudes towards North Korea are stable in Spain, with three-quarters (75%) reporting a negative perception, and just 5 per cent reporting a positive view. Opinion is somewhat less negative in Greece, but almost two-thirds of Greek respondents (64%) view North Korea unfavourably, while just 6 per cent offer a positive opinion. On the other hand, attitudes have become more neutral in Germany, with the proportion offering negative opinions falling by 29 points, to 56 per cent. However, positive opinion is at just 1 per cent, so this drop in negative ratings reflects increased uncertainty, not favour.

Views of North Korean influence have deteriorated sharply in Turkey, with negative attitudes surging 25 points to nearly half (44%), while positive opinion is largely unchanged at a third (34%). Opinion now leans negatively, a reversal from 2014, when Turkish respondents gave their most positive rating of North Korea since tracking began in 2007. Still, Turkey’s favourable opinion is the strongest expressed in the survey. In Russia, attitudes have warmed a little: positive opinion is stable at two in ten (20%), but negative opinion has diminished by seven points, to 30 per cent.

Perceptions have soured in most of the Asian countries surveyed. In neighbouring China (Pyongyang’s closest ally), negative opinion has increased the most among all the countries polled, growing by 30 points to three-quarters (76%), while positive opinion has remained stable at one-fifth (19%). In India, negative views have increased by 13 points to two in five (40%), while positive opinion holds stable at one in five (19%). In Indonesia, negative opinion is relatively unchanged since 2014 at about half (46%), but positive views have fallen by 11 points to 17 per cent. In China, India, and Indonesia, these are the least favourable views of North Korea’s influence since tracking began in 2007. Australians hold the most unfavourable opinion of North Korea in Asia, with 87 per cent presenting a negative opinion and just 6 per cent offering a positive one (both stable). Pakistan is by far the least decided country in terms of its perceptions of North Korean influence. More than half (55%) take no position. Among those who do express an opinion, the proportion who disapprove (25%, down by 7 points) slightly outweighs that which holds a favourable view (20%, down by 8 points).

African positive opinion is comparatively high, exceeded only in Turkey, but has declined since 2014, with positive ratings falling by 9 points to a third (33%) in Nigeria and by 7 points to 27 per cent in Kenya. Divided in their views in 2014, both countries now offer predominately negative views of North Korea, with disapproval at 42 per cent and 36 per cent, respectively (stable since 2014) .

In Latin America, respondents hold fairly similar, negative views of North Korea overall. Brazilian respondents offer a darker view than in 2014, with a six-point increase in negative views to 60 per cent, and positive views stable at about one in five (23%). In Peru, positive and negative views are largely unchanged at a fifth (22%) and half (51%), respectively. Both positive and negative opinions have increased in Mexico; positive views have risen by 11 points to a quarter (24%), while negative views have increased by seven points to more than half (54%).

 


 

France

France

Perceptions of French influence have improved significantly in the 17 countries surveyed in 2014 and 2017. On average, more than half of respondents (52%) have a positive opinion of French influence in the world, and fewer than one-quarter (23%) disapprove. In 2014, 48 per cent gave positive ratings, and 24 per cent disapproved.

In its ranking among the most-favourably viewed countries in the survey, France now holds fourth place, up one position since 2014. Of the 19 countries surveyed in 2017 (including France), all report a generally favourable impression of France’s influence except Pakistan (where opinion is divided) and Turkey (where it is slightly negative).

In fellow EU nations, opinion of France is very positive. In the UK, positive opinion has increased slightly to two-thirds (66%, up by 5 points), while negative opinion is largely unchanged at three in ten (29%). This is the highest proportion of favourable ratings towards France among the British since tracking began in 2005. German views have also improved, with positive opinion increasing by nine points to 56 per cent, and negative views falling steeply from one-quarter in 2014 (24%) to just 6 per cent now—the lowest negative rating among all the countries surveyed. Half in Greece (50%) see France positively, and just one in ten (11%) sees it negatively. Spanish opinion is steady but less favourable than in the other EU members surveyed, with positive and negative perceptions at 44 per cent and 26 per cent, respectively.

At Europe’s edge, Turkish views have shifted since 2014 and are again leaning negatively, after a generally positive rating emerged for the first time in 2014. Positive opinion of French influence among Turkish respondents remains relatively unchanged at almost two in five (38%), but the proportion expressing a negative opinion has increased the most of all the countries polled, leaping 14 points to 43 per cent. Meanwhile, opinion has also deteriorated in Russia, which reports the largest fall in positive views, from half (51%) to about a third (35%), while negative perceptions have risen by nine points to 22 per cent. Traditionally strongly positive, Russian ratings of French influence in the world are now at a historical low level for this survey.

Attitudes towards France are among the most favourable in North America, and have strengthened since 2014. Canadians share with China the most positive impression of France among the nations surveyed, with almost three-quarters stating a positive opinion (74%, up by 10 points). Only 14 per cent of Canadians (down by 6 points) express a negative opinion of France. In the US, positive opinion has increased solidly, from 55 to 66 per cent, while negative opinion has decreased by seven points, to 19 per cent. In both countries, perceptions are at their most favourable level since tracking began in 2005.

Positive opinion towards France has increased the most in China, surging from half (47%) to three-quarters (74%), while the proportion of Chinese holding negative views has decreased to 16 per cent (down by 11 points). Australian opinion has also improved, with an increase in positive views to almost seven in ten (69%, up by 12 points), while negative views are relatively stable at one-quarter (23%). Opinion in the other surveyed Asian countries is more muted, with pluralities not taking a clear stance on their views of France. Positive opinion in India is stable at 37 per cent, while negative opinion has somewhat decreased (20%, down by 5 points); a plurality of Indians are undecided (43%). While overall opinion has warmed in Pakistan, nearly half of Pakistanis (49%) are neither positive nor negative in their views of France’s influence; a quarter approve (25%, down by 5 points), and a similar proportion disapprove (26%, down by 12 points). Indonesia is the only Asian nation where opinion has clearly soured, with a 15-point drop in positive views (to 31%) and stable negative views at about a quarter (26%). As with respondents in India and Pakistan, a plurality of Indonesians express no strong view (49%).

Views of France in the three Latin American countries surveyed are positive. Mexican views have improved strongly, and show the largest increase in positive opinion after China, rising 22 points to over half (56%). While negative views continue to hover at a quarter (24%), this is the most favourable impression of France among Mexicans overall since tracking began. Brazilian views are similar, but unchanged since 2014 (59% positive vs. 19% negative). In Peru, perceptions have deteriorated slightly: while positive opinion is stable at almost half of respondents (47%), negative opinion has increased by nine points to one-quarter (25%).

In Africa, Nigerian and Kenyan perceptions are very similar to one another and little changed from 2014, with over half in both countries seeing France positively (55% in Nigeria, 53% in Kenya), and negative views stable at 24 per cent and 21 per cent, respectively.

 


 

China

China

Globally, perceptions of China’s influence have deteriorated slightly since 2014, and are divided. On average, across the 17 tracking countries polled in both 2014 and 2017, the proportion of respondents expressing favourable views of China stands at 41 per cent (down by 2 points), and the proportion with negative views is at 42 per cent (up by 2 points). In several countries, however, unfavourable opinion is at the highest levels yet recorded in this survey.

In terms of positive views, China ranks seventh of the 17 countries rated, moving up one place from 2014. Of the 19 countries surveyed (including China), nine lean positively in their opinion of China’s influence, one is divided (Australia), and nine lean negatively.

Opinion is generally negative in Asia, and has deteriorated since 2014, particularly in India. Negative views among Indian respondents have increased by 25 points to 60 per cent, and positive views have dropped by 14 points to 19 per cent. Divided in 2014, overall Indian opinion is now strongly negative, and is at its most unfavourable towards China since tracking began in 2005. Worsening views of China are also apparent among Indonesians, where overall opinion has flipped since 2014: negative opinion has risen by 22 points to 50 per cent, while positive opinion has dropped 24 points to 28 per cent. For the first time since tracking began in 2005, a majority of Indonesians disapprove of China’s role in the world. Australian opinion remains divided and largely unchanged, with negative opinion at 47 per cent and positive opinion at 46 per cent. On the other hand, Pakistani perceptions of China’s influence continue to be very favourable: despite a drop of 12 points, positive views are still at 63 per cent, while negative ratings have remained stable at 12 per cent.

Within the EU, perceptions of China’s influence are generally quite negative. Spanish negative opinion is the most decisive, and has risen to 68 per cent (up by 9 points), while positive opinion has fallen to 15 per cent (down by 9 points). This constitutes the least favourable rating of China among all the countries polled. In the UK, views have shifted from being divided in 2014 to leaning negatively in 2017. Negative perceptions among British respondents have increased from 46 to 58 per cent, while positive attitudes have decreased by 12 points to 37 per cent, producing the most unfavourable British rating of China since tracking began in 2005. By contrast, attitudes towards China in Germany have warmed a great deal. Germany shows the largest fall in negative opinion among all the countries surveyed, with a drop of 41 points to 35 per cent, while positive opinion has doubled to 20 per cent. In France, views have improved but remain negative overall: negative ratings have decreased by 8 points to 60 per cent, while positive attitudes have increased by 9 points to over a third (35%). Greece is the only European country leaning positively in its view of China’s influence, with a plurality of 37 per cent holding a positive opinion (vs. 25% who offer a negative opinion).

In Turkey, negative opinion of China has surged, rising by 23 points to 54 per cent, while positive views are stable at three in ten (29%). Perceptions are largely unchanged in Russia, where a plurality remains positive towards China’s influence (44%), with just under one-quarter (23%) viewing it as negative.

North American views of China remain negative, especially in the US. Americans present the most negative opinion in all of the countries polled, with seven in ten (70%) having a negative view and just two in ten (22%) offering a positive opinion (both fairly stable). However, perceptions have improved in Canada, with a lower proportion than in 2014 reporting negative views (51%, down by 13 points), and a higher proportion expressing a positive view (37%, up by 9 points).

Attitudes towards China have evolved in different directions since 2014 in Latin America, but they remain generally positive. Mexican views have shifted from being fairly negative to a comfortably positive position in 2017, following a 22-point rise in approval and a 14-point fall in disapproval. While 26 per cent remain negative about China’s influence, the 55 per cent who are positive represent the highest proportion recorded in Mexico since tracking began in 2005. In Peru and Brazil, pluralities of 49 and 45 per cent respectively view China’s influence in the world positively. However, these ratings have softened since 2014 (down by 5 points in Peru and by 7 points in Brazil). Negative views have increased in both countries as well, by 10 points to one-third (34%) among Peruvians, and by 9 points (to 38%) among Brazilians.

African views of China’s influence, as in 2014, are generally positive. Positive opinion in Nigeria is stable at 83 per cent, with negative views at 9 per cent. This is the highest level of approval among the countries polled (except in China itself, where self-approval stands at 88%). In Kenya, both positive and negative views remain stable at 63 per cent and 27 per cent, respectively.

 


 

Brazil

Brazil

Global perceptions of Brazil’s influence lean positively overall, although they have deteriorated sharply since 2014. On average, across the 16 tracking countries surveyed in both 2014 and 2017, the proportion of respondents holding a positive opinion has fallen to 38 per cent (from 44% in 2014), while the proportion offering a negative view has gone up by 2 points to 30 per cent. Of the 18 countries surveyed in 2017 (including Brazil), eight lean positively in their opinion of Brazil’s influence, five are divided, and five lean negatively.

Brazil ranks as the eighth most-favourably viewed of the 17 nations rated, a drop of one position from 2014.

Despite the observed overall decline, views of Brazil’s influence have improved in its fellow BRIC nations. China shows the largest increase in favourable views since 2014, and has the most positive view of Brazil among the countries surveyed, with over half (57%, up by 23 points) offering a positive opinion, and one-third (34%, up by 6 points) offering a negative one. Opinion is stable in Russia, with more than one-third (36%) holding positive views and fewer than one in ten (9%) holding negative ones—the lowest proportion among all of the countries surveyed. It should be noted, however, that a majority of Russians (55%) are undecided in their opinion. This neutral proportion is also high among Indians (47%), where positive opinion remains stable at almost one-third (32%), while negative opinion has decreased slightly from 26 to 21 per cent.

Positive perceptions have stumbled in Indonesia, Australia, and Pakistan, and are now the least favourable they have been since tracking began (in 2008, 2010 for Pakistan). Although views remain positive overall, positive ratings of Brazil have plunged in Indonesia, dropping 20 points to just above one-third (36%), while negative ratings are stable at 19 per cent. Positive opinion has also fallen in Australia, with a 12-point drop to 37 per cent. With negative opinion largely unchanged at the same proportion (37%), Australians are now divided in their opinion after leaning positively in 2014. In Pakistan, both positive and negative opinion have decreased, with the majority now undecided in their views of Brazil: only 16 per cent of Pakistanis offer a positive opinion (down by 10 points), while 23 per cent offer a negative opinion (down by 9 points). Fully 61 per cent offer no strong opinion.

In Latin America, Peruvian views of Brazil’s influence have soured. Although opinion still leans positively, with 48 per cent posting positive views, this is down by 13 points compared to 2014, and almost a third of Peruvians now offer negative ratings (31%, up by 14 points). This is the least favourable Peruvian opinion of Brazil since tracking began in 2011. Tellingly, Brazilians’ opinion about their own country’s influence has become much more negative than before, and Brazilians now offer the most unfavourable view of their own country. Only one in three Brazilians (30%) rates Brazil favourably, a deep collapse since 2014 (when it was 66%) and from the tracking high-point in 2012 (88%). A majority of Brazilians now views Brazil’s influence in the world negatively (64%, up by 46 points).

In North America, perceptions have also taken a negative turn, marking the first time that views of Brazil do not lean strongly positively in the US and Canada. Positive opinion has decreased by 15 points to two in five (40%) in the US, and negative opinion has increased by 16 points to a similar proportion (39%); American opinion about Brazil is now divided. The figures are quite similar in Canada, although Canadians remain narrowly positive, with two in five (41%, down by 15 points) offering a positive opinion of Brazil, and 36 per cent (up by 12 points) offering a negative one.

In Africa, majorities in Nigeria and Kenya remain positive towards Brazil (52% and 50%, respectively, but down by 7 points in Nigeria). However, negative opinion is at its highest since tracking began in 2008, with about three in ten (31%, up by 6 points) having an unfavourable opinion in Nigeria, and one-quarter (25%, up by 7 points) holding unfavourable views in Kenya.

In Europe, France and the UK report exactly the same, divided result, with 46 per cent of respondents approving of Brazil’s role in the world, and 43 per cent disapproving. In the UK, these views are largely unchanged from 2014, but they represent a shift in French opinion, which tended to be positive in 2014 (55% positive vs. 32% negative). In the other EU countries surveyed, high proportions are neutral in their views of Brazil, especially in Germany. German opinion has moved from being strongly negative in 2014 (21% positive vs. 59% negative) to being fairly neutral (6% positive, 78% with no stated opinion, and 16% negative). In Spain, opinion leans negatively overall after being divided in 2014, with positive views falling from 35 to 21 per cent, and negative views holding at 39 per cent. Neutral responses make up 40 per cent of the sample. In Greece, half (50%) state no opinion about Brazil’s influence, while two in ten (21%) express a positive opinion, and three in ten (29%) express a negative one. As in 2014, Turkish opinion is also divided (at 38% positive vs. 36% negative).

 


 

South Korea

South Korea

 

Views of South Korean influence are divided globally, and have become slightly less favourable since 2014. On average, across the 18 tracking countries surveyed in both 2014 and 2017, 37 per cent of respondents have a positive opinion (down by 1 point), and 36 per cent express a negative opinion (up by 1 point). In most of the surveyed Asian countries, however, opinion has taken a negative turn.

In terms of positive views, South Korea now ties with India in ninth position out of the 17 rated countries, a modest increase from eleventh position in 2014. Of the 19 countries surveyed in 2017, eight lean positively in their perception of South Korea’s influence, five are divided, and six lean negatively.

Asian views offer a mixed picture, but have become more negative in all surveyed countries except Australia, where opinion is relatively unchanged since 2014. Australia is the most favourably minded of all the countries surveyed, with 61 percent offering positive opinions, and just 24 per cent disapproving of South Korea. Opinion is also generally favourable in Indonesia, although positive views have fallen by 11 points to 37 per cent since 2014; negative opinion remains stable at 23 per cent, and 40 per cent of Indonesians now offer no strong opinion. Perceptions have taken a downturn in Pakistan, with negative opinion stable at 22 per cent and positive opinion having decreased to 19 per cent (a drop of 12 points). The majority of Pakistanis (59%) offer no strong opinion on this question, Perceptions are divided in India (27% positive vs. 28% negative), with 45 per cent of Indians not stating any strong view. China offers a darker picture, and now offers the least favourable view of South Korea among the nations polled. Chinese perceptions have shifted radically since 2014, from being positive to leaning very unfavourably this year. Negative opinion has more than doubled, from 32 to 71 per cent—the largest increase among all the nations polled—and positive opinion has dropped by 15 points over the same period, to 25 per cent.

In Russia, opinion is stable and positive among those who offer a clear view (32% positive vs. 20% negative), but almost half of Russians do not express a strong opinion about South Korea’s influence (48%). In Turkey, opinion has deteriorated since 2014, but remains favourable overall, with stable positive ratings at 39 per cent, and negative ratings at 33 percent (up by 11 points).

In the European Union, attitudes have warmed towards South Korea among the countries surveyed. Views are the most positive in the UK, following an increase in positive opinion of seven points (to 52%), and a decrease of five points in negative opinion (to 40%). Divided in 2014, British opinion about South Korea is now at its highest level since tracking began in 2010. Perceptions have remained divided in France, with nearly half of French respondents (45%) holding a positive opinion and a similar proportion (44%) holding a negative opinion. In Germany, negative views continue to exceed positive ones (32% vs. 11%). However, opinion is much less critical than it was in 2014, as the proportion of unfavourable ratings has fallen by 27 points. Positive ratings have also fallen (by 13 points), leaving a majority of Germans expressing no strong opinion (57%). In Spain, positive opinion is stable at 24 per cent, but negative opinion has fallen by eight points since 2014, to 42 per cent. In Greece, views are narrowly negative among those who have a clear opinion (24% positive vs. 29% negative), but a plurality (47%) offers no strong opinion about South Korea’s influence in the world.

North American attitudes towards South Korea lean positively, and have remained stable since 2014. Just over half in the US (51%) and nearly half in Canada (47%) hold positive opinions of South Korean influence, with approximately one-third in each country offering negative views (33% in the US, 36% in Canada).

Latin American views are not as favourable. Perceptions are largely stable in Peru and Brazil. Opinion remains divided among Peruvians (37% positive vs. 37% negative), and continues to edge into negative territory in Brazil (36% positive vs. 46% negative). Opinion remains slightly negative in Mexico, yet has become more favourable in 2017, after the largest increase in positive views among the nations polled (up by 14 points, to 36%). Negative opinion in Mexico has remained stable (at 42%).

In Africa, Nigerian opinion is favourable and stable, with nearly half (44%) holding positive views, and about one-third (34%) holding negative views. Kenyan attitudes towards South Korea have become divided: while positive opinion is largely unchanged (34%), negative opinion has increased to the same proportion (34%, up by 6 points).

Methodology

In total 17,910 citizens in Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Greece, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru, Russia, Spain, Turkey, the UK, and the United States were interviewed face-to-face or by telephone between December 26, 2016 and April 27, 2017. Questions were asked by half samples in all countries polled except in India. Polling was conducted for BBC World Service by GlobeScan and its research partners in each country, together with the Program for Public Consultation (PPC) at the University of Maryland.

In Brazil, China, Indonesia, Kenya, and Turkey urban samples were used. The margin of error per country ranges from +/- 3.1 to 5.2 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

 

Country
Sample Size (unweighted)
Field dates
Sample frame
Survey methodology
Type of sample
Australia 800 February 6–19, 2017 18+ Telephone National
Brazil 810 March 20 – April 10, 2017 18-69 Face-to-face Urban1
Canada 1000 January 27 – February 15, 2017 18+ Telephone National
China 1171 February 24, – April 25, 2017 18+ Telephone Urban2
France 1009 February 6-16, 2017 18+ Telephone National
Germany 1002 January 13–31, 2017 16-70 Telephone National
Greece 709 March 17 – April 19, 2017 18+ Telephone National
India 1018 January 19 – March 23, 2017 18+ Telephone National
Indonesia 1000 March 8–22, 2017 18+ Face-to-face Urban3
Kenya 1010 February 1–15, 2017 18+ Face-to-face Urban4
Mexico 799 April 22–27, 2017 18+ Face-to-face National
Nigeria 800 February 2–8, 2017 18+ Face-to-face National
Pakistan 1000 December 26, 2016 – January 13, 2017 18+ Face-to-face National
Peru 1000 April 13–26, 2017 18-70 Face-to-face National
Russia 1018 February 3-22, 2017 18+ Telephone National
Spain 797 February 8-15, 2017 18+ Telephone National
Turkey 966 March 2–20, 2017 15+ Face-to-face Urban5
United Kingdom 1001 January 27 – February 19, 2017 18+ Telephone National
USA 1000 January 19 February 1, 2017 18+ Telephone National
  1. In Brazil the survey was conducted in Belo Horizonte, Brasília, Curitiba, Goiânia, Porto Alegre, Recife, Rio de Janeiro, Salvador, São Paulo, representing 23 per cent of the national adult population.
  2. In China the survey was conducted in Beijing, Chengdu, Chongqing, Dalian, Guangzhou, Hangzhou,  Harbin, Shanghai, Shenyang, Shijiazhuang, Tianjin, Wuhan, Xi’an, and Zhengzhou, representing 15 per cent of the national adult population.
  3. In Indonesia the survey was conducted in Bandung, Jakarta, Makassar, Medan, and Surabaya, representing 8 per cent of the national adult population.
  4. In Kenya the survey was conducted in Bomet, Bungoma, Elgeyo-Marakwet, Embu, Homa Bay,   Kajiago, Kakamega, Kericho, Kiambu, Kilifi, Kirinyaga, Kisii, Kisumu, Kwale, Machakos, Makueni,  Meru, Migori, Mombasa, Nairobi, Nakuru, Nyandarua, Siaya, Tharaka, Turkana, Uasin, Gishu, and Vihiga, representing 32 per cent of the national adult population.
  5. In Turkey the survey was conducted in İstanbul, Tekirdağ, Bursa, İzmir, Adana, Samsun, Trabzon, Ankara, Kayseri, Malatya, Diyarbakır, and Erzurum, representing 47 per cent of the national adult population.

Research Partners

Country Research Institute Location Contact
Australia GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767
Brazil Market Analysis Florianopolis Fabián Echegaray
fabian@marketanalysis.com.br
+55 48 3364 0000
Canada GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767
China GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767
France Efficience 3 Paris and Rheims Thierry Laurain
thierry.l@efficience3.com
+33 1 4316 5442
Germany Ri*QUESTA GmbH Teningen Bernhard Rieder
riquesta.rieder@t-online.de
+49 7641 93 43 36
Greece MRB Hellas Athens Vivian Antonopoulou
vantonopoulou@mrb.gr
+30210 6971000 /+306944 414756
India Team C Voter Noida Yashwant Deshmukh
yashwant@teamcvoter.com
+91 120 424 7135
Indonesia DEKA Marketing Research Jakarta Ratna Mulia Darmawan
ratna.darmawan@deka-research.co.id
+62 21 723 6901
Kenya Research Path Associates Ltd. Nairobi Charles Onsongo
charles.onsongo@rpa.co.ke
+254 20 2734770
Mexico Parametría Mexico City Francisco Abundis
fabundis@parametria.com.mx
+52 55 2614 0089
Nigeria Market Trends Lagos Jo Ebhomenye
joebhomenye@hotmail.com
+234 1734 7384
Pakistan Gallup Pakistan Islamabad Ijaz Shafi Gilani
isb@gallup.com.pk
+92 51 2655630
Peru Datum Lima Urpi Torrado
urpi@datum.com.pe
+511 215 0600
Russia CESSI Institute for Comparative Social Research Moscow Vladimir Andreenkov
vladimir.andreenkov@cessi.ru
+7 495 650 55 18
Spain Sigma Dos Int. Madrid Petrana Valentinova
petrana@sigmados.com
+34 91 360 0474
Turkey Yöntem Research Consultancy Ltd. Istanbul Mehmet Aktulga
mehmet.aktulga@yontemresearch.com
+90 212 278 12 19
United Kingdom Populus Data Solutions London Patrick Diamond
pdiamond@populusdatasolutions.com
+44 207 553 4148
USA GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767

Questionnaire

I would now like to ask your impressions of some specific countries.

M1A. Please tell me if you think each of the following countries is having a mainly positive or mainly negative influence in the world. ROTATE

at) China
01 – Mainly positive
02 – Mainly negative
VOLUNTEERED (DO NOT READ)
03 – Depends
04 – Neither, neutral
99 – DK/NA
bt) France
ct) The United States
dt) The European Union
et) Japan
ft) Israel
gt) North Korea
ht) Canada

 

M1B. Please tell me if you think each of the following countries is having a mainly positive or mainly negative influence in the world. ROTATE

at) The United Kingdom
01 – Mainly positive
02 – Mainly negative
VOLUNTEERED (DO NOT READ)
03 – Depends
04 – Neither, neutral
99 – DK/NA
bt) Russia
ct) India
dt) Iran
et) Brazil
ft) Pakistan
gt) Germany
ht) South Africa
it) South Korea

Doping a Problem but Olympic Success Remains a Driver of National Pride: Global Poll

Header---BBC-Press-Releases

 

Download this Press Release (PDF)

A new BBC World Service poll suggests a majority say doping scandals reduce their interest in the Olympics. Overall pride in how well their country performs in the Games has softened since before the London Games.

The poll, conducted by GlobeScan among more than 19,000 people in 19 countries between December 2015 and April 2016 asked the public to what extent their attention to the Olympic Games is negatively affected due to the use of performance-enhancing drugs by some athletes.

On average, across the 19 countries surveyed, a majority of 57 per cent say that the use of doping has “a lot” or “some” negative effect on their level of attention to the Games. Majorities of those polled in 13 of the 19 countries say they feel this way, with citizens of South Korea (78%), Peru (74%), Australia (70%), and France (69%) most negatively affected by doping. Conversely, Germans (35%) and Brazilians (36%) are least affected.

Asked how much their country’s performance in the Olympic Games affects the pride they feel in being a citizen of their country, an average of 62 per cent of citizens say that their country’s performance has “a lot” or “some” impact on their national pride. Across 16 countries polled by the BBC on this question in both 2011 and 2016, the overall proportion has decreased slightly (61% today vs. 63% in 2011), and the percentage saying “a lot” has fallen seven points (from 37% to 30%) suggesting a softening from the level prior to the London Olympics.

Though majorities in 15 out of the 19 countries surveyed link their sense of national pride, at least to some extent, with their country’s performance during the Olympic Games, views between countries differ widely. The impact of Olympic success in driving national pride is strongest in emerging economies, especially Indonesia (78%), Kenya (76%), Russia (74%), Peru (72%), and India (71%). It is weakest in Brazil (42%), Germany (48%), the US (48%), and France (50%).

GlobeScan Chairman Doug Miller commented: “The poll suggests that the Olympic Games continue to positively stimulate national pride, especially among citizens in emerging economies. However, the poll results also underscore the important role the World Anti-Doping Agency plays in protecting the Olympic franchise.”


Detailed Findings

Despite the prospect of hosting the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio this August, a decreasing number of Brazilians say the way their athletes perform during the Games has an effect on their national pride. Only 42 per cent express this opinion (6 points below the percentage recorded a few months before the London Olympics), and they are now largely outnumbered by those who say Olympic performance matters only “a little” or “not at all” to the pride they feel in being Brazilian (58%).

The picture in Brazil contrasts with the situation in other developing and middle-income countries where, like in the 2011 poll, the feeling of national pride among citizens continues to get excited from achievements at the Olympics, even if to a lesser degree in some countries. Although they show the most vibrant reactions, the sense of pride among Indonesians and Kenyans has softened (78%, down 5 points from 2011 in Indonesia; 76%, down 15 points in Kenya). It has also decreased in Nigeria (56%, down 5 points) and in Ghana (51%, down 13 points). However, the impact of Olympic success in driving national pride has strengthened in Russia (74%, up 14 points) and India (71%, up 5 points), and is stable in Peru (72%) and Pakistan (65%).

In the more industrialised economies, the impact is more limited. Except in Spain (68% feeling proud, up 9 points) and Canada (62%), opinions in France, Germany, and the US are divided, with roughly as many saying that Olympic performance does affect their national pride as those saying it matters “just a little” or “not at all.” In the UK, despite a record medal sweep at home in 2012, a narrow majority (53%) say the way British athletes perform impact their sense of pride of being Britons, a proportion fairly stable with 2011 (50%).

Looking at the impact of doping on people’s engagement with the Olympic Games, Brazil and Germany stand quite at odds with the dominant mood, as the only two countries with majorities saying that the use of doping affects “just a little” or “not at all” the way they bond with the Olympics (62% and 60%, respectively).

Russian opinion is interesting (and relevant to the current doping controversy that could see several of the Russian athletes barred from competing in the Rio Olympics). Russians are among the most engaged and likely to consider Olympic performance as a catalyst for national pride (and seemingly increasingly so in the aftermath of the Sochi Games in 2014). But Russians are split on the question of doping: 49 per cent (third highest proportion) lean the same way as the majority does in Brazil and Germany, but an equal proportion (49%) report that the use of drugs by some athletes negatively affects their attention to the Olympics.

The results are drawn from a telephone and in-person survey of 19,116 adult citizens across 19 participating countries in total. The poll was conducted for the BBC World Service between December 2, 2015 and April 15, 2016 by the international opinion research and consultancy firm GlobeScan and its national research partners. Within-country results are considered accurate within +/- 2.8 to 3.5 per cent 19 times out of 20. Urban-only samples were used in Brazil, China, Indonesia and Kenya.


Participating Countries


Detailed Findings

 

 


Media Contacts

For media interviews, please contact:


About BBC World Service

BBC World Service is an international multimedia broadcaster, delivering a wide range of language and regional services on radio, TV, online and via wireless handheld devices. It uses multiple platforms to reach its weekly audience of 166 million globally, including shortwave, AM, FM, digital satellite and cable channels. Its news sites include audio and video content and offer opportunities to join the global debate. BBC World Service offers its multilingual radio content to partner FM stations around the world and has numerous partnerships supplying content to news websites, mobile phones and other wireless handheld devices as well as TV channels. For more information, visit bbcworldservice.com

Methodology

In total 19,116 citizens in Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, France, Germany, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru, Russia, South Korea, Spain, the UK, and the United States were interviewed face-to-face or by telephone between December 2, 2015 and April 15, 2016. Polling was conducted by GlobeScan and its research partners in each country.

In Brazil, China, Indonesia and Kenya urban samples were used. The margin of error per country ranges from +/- 2.8 to 3.5 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

 

Country
Sample Size (unweighted)
Field dates
Sample frame
Survey methodology
Type of sample
Australia 802 February 29 – March 21, 2016 18+ Telephone National
Brazil 804 January 25 – February 12 2016 18-69 Face to Face Urban1
Canada 1020 March 7–24, 2016 18+ Telephone National
Chile 1200 December 2, 2015 – January 5, 2016 18+ Face-to-face National
China 1055 April 2–15, 2016 18+ Telephone Urban2
France 1055 February 22 – March 3, 2016 18+ Telephone National
Germany 1001 February 4–18, 2016 16-70 Telephone National
Ghana 1053 March 16 – April 12, 2016 18-65 Face-to-face National
India 1269 March 15–30, 2016 18+ Face-to-face National
Indonesia 1000 March 12–26, 2016 18+ Face-to-face Urban3
Kenya 1010 March 4–20, 2016 18+ Face-to-face Urban4
Nigeria 800 March 9–24, 2016 18+ Face-to-face National
Pakistan 1000 February 19 – March 5, 2016 18+ Face-to-face National
Peru 1205 March 14–27, 2016 18-70 Face-to-face National
Russia 1020 March 9–21, 2016 18+ Face-to-face National
South Korea 1000 March 20–24, 2016 19+ Telephone National
Spain 815 February 29 – March 29, 2016 18+ Telephone National
United Kingdom 1005 February 22 – March 13, 2016 18+ Telephone National
USA 1006 February 29 – March 13, 2016 18+ Telephone National
  1. In Brazil the survey was conducted in Belo Horizonte, Brasília, Curitiba, Goiânia, Porto Alegre, Recife, Rio de Janeiro, Salvador, São Paulo, representing 23 per cent of the national adult population.
  2. In China the survey was conducted in Beijing, Chengdu, Chongqing, Fuzhou, Guangzhou, Hangzhou, Harbin, Hefei, Kunming, Nanning, Shanghai, Shenyang, Taiyuan, Tianjin, Wuhan, Xi’an, Xining, and Zhengzhou, representing 14 per cent of the national adult population.
  3. In Indonesia the survey was conducted in Bandung, Jakarta, Makassar, Medan, and Surabaya, representing 27 per cent of the national adult population.
  4. In Kenya, the survey was conducted in seven out of the eight former administrative provinces targeting the 45 per cent of the adult population in urban and mixed settlements. The survey sample included urban populations in 30 counties representing 64 per cent of all counties. The counties included in the sample were: Bungoma, Busia, Embu, Kajiado, Kakamega, Kericho, Kiambu, Kilifi, Kirinyaga, Kisii, Kisumu, Kitui, Kwale, Laikipia, Machakos, Marsabit, Meru, Migori, Mombasa, Nairobi, Nakuru, Narok, Nyamira, Nyandarua, Nyeri, Siaya, Trans Nzoia, Turkana, Uasin Gishu, and Vihiga.

Research Partners

Country Research Institute Location Contact
Australia GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767
Brazil Market Analysis Florianópolis Fabián Echegaray
fabian@marketanalysis.com.br
+55 48 3364 0000
Canada GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767
Chile Mori Chile Santiago Marta Lagos
mlagos@morichile.cl
+56 2334 4544
China GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767
France Efficience 3 Paris and Rheims Thierry Laurain
thierry.l@efficience3.com
+33 1 4316 5442
Germany Ri*QUESTA GmbH Teningen Bernhard Rieder
riquesta.rieder@t-online.de
+49 7641 93 43 36
Ghana Business Interactive Consulting Limited Accra Razaaque Animashaun
info@bigghana.com
+233 302 783140 / +233 302 782892
India Team C Voter Noida Yashwant Deshmukh
yashwant@teamcvoter.com
+91 120 424 7135
Indonesia DEKA Marketing Research Jakarta Ratna Mulia Darmawan
ratna.darmawan@deka-research.co.id
+62 21 723 6901
Kenya Research Path Associates Ltd. Nairobi Charles Onsongo
charles.onsongo@rpa.co.ke
+254 20 2734770
Nigeria Market Trends Lagos Jo Ebhomenye
joebhomenye@hotmail.com
+234 1734 7384
Pakistan Gallup Pakistan Islamabad Ijaz Shafi Gilani
isb@gallup.com.pk
+92 51 2655630
Peru Datum Lima Urpi Torrado
urpi@datum.com.pe
+511 215 0600
Russia CESSI Institute for Comparative Social Research Moscow Vladimir Andreenkov
vladimir.andreenkov@cessi.ru
+7 495 650 55 18
South Korea East Asia Institute Seoul Wonchil Chung
cwc@eai.or.kr
+82 2 2277 1683
Spain Sigma Dos Int. Madrid Petrana Valentinova
petrana@sigmados.com
+34 91 360 0474
United Kingdom Populus Data Solutions London Patrick Diamond
pdiamond@populusdatasolutions.com
+44 207 553 4148
USA GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767

Question Wording

M5t. How much does the way your country performs in the Olympic Games affect the pride you feel in being a citizen of [Country]? READ. CODE ONE.

01 – A lot
02 – Some
03 – Just a little
04 – Not at all
VOLUNTEERED (DO NOT READ)
99 – Don’t know / no answer

 

M6. To what extent does your attention to the Olympic Games get negatively affected due to the use of performance-enhancing drugs by some athletes? READ. CODE ONE ONLY.

01 – A lot
02 – Some
03 – Just a little
04 – Not at all
VOLUNTEERED (DO NOT READ)
99 – Don’t know / no answer

Obama’s 8-year Presidency is Rated Well: Global Poll

Header---BBC-Press-Releases

 

Download this Press Release (PDF)

7 July 2016 – Global support for President Obama appears to have lasted through his two terms in office according to a new poll for the BBC World Service. Over seven in ten citizens across 18 tracking countries polled by Globescan in both 2012 and 2016 think that, retrospectively, the election of US President Barack Obama was a good choice. The most recent poll shows his average approval rating is 72 per cent―stable with the result from the 2012 BBC poll (when Obama was running for a second term) when 73 per cent had a favourable opinion of his first presidency.

The most recent poll, conducted by GlobeScan among more than 18,000 people worldwide between December 2015 and May 2016 asked the public to reflect on whether or not, in hindsight, they felt the choice of the American people to elect Obama in 2008 and again in 2012 was a good or a bad choice. A majority in 18 out of the 19 countries surveyed leaned positively towards Obama’s double tenure in the White House, with only Russians disagreeing.

Kenyans are the most upbeat towards Obama’s presidential tenure, with 95 per cent thinking his double election was a good choice. The other countries with a very strong pro-Obama sentiment include some of the USA’s closest allies: South Korea (93%, up 10 points from 2012), the UK (91%, up 9 points), France (90%, stable), Australia (89%, stable), and Canada (85%, stable). In some countries where the relationship with Washington may have been more ambivalent at times, the proportion of supporters of Obama’s time in office has also increased, with majorities now found in Turkey (52%, up 6 points), Pakistan (56%, up 7 points), and China (54%, up 5 points).

Positive sentiment towards Obama has nonetheless declined in five countries since 2012. In particular, Russian public opinion has shifted from a pro- to a now strongly anti-Obama sentiment. Only 18 per cent of Russians feel Obama’s eight-year time in office was a good choice in hindsight, as opposed to a majority of 51 per cent in 2012, and they are outnumbered by 73 per cent who now think this was a bad choice. In Germany, approval of Obama has also dropped sharply, from 91 per cent in 2012 to 53 per cent in 2016, with an increase in the proportion of people with an undecided opinion of the president (jumping from 2% to 29%). In the US itself, whose views are not included in the global average, a majority remains pro-Obama after his two terms, though narrower than in 2012 (53% today, down 5 points). The other two countries where support had fallen are Nigeria (74%, down 14 points) and Ghana (70%, down 8 points).

Amidst the race for the US primaries to nominate the two candidates that will campaign to replace President Obama in January 2017, the poll also asked if the election of a woman as the next American President would impact views the public holds towards the United States as a country. Globally, results show that a solid plurality of 48 per cent in 17 countries agree that a female president would fundamentally change their perceptions of the US (against 38% who disagree). This resembles results from a similarly-worded 2008 BBC poll question which asked the impact if Barack Obama was elected as the first African American president on respondents’ impression of the US. Though the poll does not specify whether this would be positively or negatively, it is noteworthy that the effect of a female president on external perceptions of the US would be strongest in developing countries, and particularly so among female respondents in China (74%), Nigeria and Peru (both 65%), and Indonesia and Kenya (both 54%).

GlobeScan Chairman Doug Miller commented: “Any US President would be very happy with such positive global ratings near the end of their tenure.”

 

The results are drawn from a telephone and in-person survey of 18,313 adult citizens across 19 participating countries in total. The poll was conducted for the BBC World Service between December 2, 2015 and May 4, 2016 by the international opinion research and consultancy firm GlobeScan and its national research partners. Within-country results are considered accurate within +/- 2.8 to 3.7 per cent 19 times out of 20. Urban-only samples were used in China, Indonesia, Kenya, and Turkey. 

For more detaild findings, see below. For full methodology, question wording, and research partners, please see the drop-down links at the bottom of this article.


Participating Countries


Detailed Findings


Media Contacts

For media interviews, please contact:


About BBC World Service

BBC World Service is an international multimedia broadcaster, delivering a wide range of language and regional services on radio, TV, online and via wireless handheld devices. It uses multiple platforms to reach its weekly audience of 166 million globally, including shortwave, AM, FM, digital satellite and cable channels. Its news sites include audio and video content and offer opportunities to join the global debate. BBC World Service offers its multilingual radio content to partner FM stations around the world and has numerous partnerships supplying content to news websites, mobile phones and other wireless handheld devices as well as TV channels. For more information, visit bbcworldservice.com

Methodology

In total 18,312 citizens in Australia, Canada, Chile, China, France, Germany, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru, Russia, South Korea, Spain, Turkey, the UK, and the United States were interviewed face-to-face or by telephone between December 2, 2015 and May 4, 2016. Polling was conducted by GlobeScan and its research partners in each country.

In China, Indonesia, Kenya, and Turkey urban samples were used. Some questions were asked by half samples. The margin of error per country at full sample level ranges from +/- 2.8 to 3.7 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

 

Country
Sample Size (unweighted)
Field dates
Sample frame
Survey methodology
Type of sample
Australia 802 February 29 – March 21, 2016 18+ Telephone National
Canada 1020 March 7–24, 2016 18+ Telephone National
Chile 1200 December 2, 2015 – January 5, 2016 18+ Face-to-face National
China 1055 April 2–15, 2016 18+ Telephone Urban1
France 1055 February 22 – March 3, 2016 18+ Telephone National
Germany 1001 February 4–18, 2016 16-70 Telephone National
Ghana 1053 March 16 – April 12, 2016 18-65 Face-to-face National
India 1269 March 15–30, 2016 18+ Face-to-face National
Indonesia 1000 March 12–26, 2016 18+ Face-to-face Urban2
Kenya 1010 March 4–20, 2016 18+ Face-to-face Urban3
Nigeria 800 March 9–24, 2016 18+ Face-to-face National
Pakistan 1000 February 19 – March 5, 2016 18+ Face-to-face National
Peru 1205 March 14–27, 2016 18-70 Face-to-face National
Russia 1020 March 9–21, 2016 18+ Face-to-face National
South Korea 1000 March 20–24, 2016 19+ Telephone National
Spain 815 February 29 – March 29, 2016 18+ Telephone National
Turkey 995 April 15 – May 4, 2016 18+ Face-to-face Urban4
United Kingdom 1005 February 22 – March 13, 2016 18+ Telephone National
USA 1006 February 29 – March 13, 2016 18+ Telephone National
  1. In China the survey was conducted in Beijing, Chengdu, Chongqing, Fuzhou, Guangzhou, Hangzhou, Harbin, Hefei, Kunming, Nanning, Shanghai, Shenyang, Taiyuan, Tianjin, Wuhan, Xi’an, Xining, and Zhengzhou, representing 14 per cent of the national adult population.
  2. In Indonesia the survey was conducted in Bandung, Jakarta, Makassar, Medan, and Surabaya, representing 27 per cent of the national adult population.
  3. In Kenya, the survey was conducted in seven out of the eight former administrative provinces targeting the 45 per cent of the adult population in urban and mixed settlements. The survey sample included urban populations in 30 counties representing 64 per cent of all counties. The counties included in the sample were: Bungoma, Busia, Embu, Kajiado, Kakamega, Kericho, Kiambu, Kilifi, Kirinyaga, Kisii, Kisumu, Kitui, Kwale, Laikipia, Machakos, Marsabit, Meru, Migori, Mombasa, Nairobi, Nakuru, Narok, Nyamira, Nyandarua, Nyeri, Siaya, Trans Nzoia, Turkana, Uasin Gishu, and Vihiga.
  4. In Turkey, the survey was conducted in Adana, Ankara, Bursa, Diyarbakır, Erzurum, İstanbul, İzmir, Kayseri, Malatya, Samsun Trabzon, and Tekirdağ, representing 47 per cent of the national adult population.

Research Partners

Country Research Institute Location Contact
Australia GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767
Canada GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767
Chile Mori Chile Santiago Marta Lagos
mlagos@morichile.cl
+56 2334 4544
China GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767
France Efficience 3 Paris and Rheims Thierry Laurain
thierry.l@efficience3.com
+33 1 4316 5442
Germany Ri*QUESTA GmbH Teningen Bernhard Rieder
riquesta.rieder@t-online.de
+49 7641 93 43 36
Greece MRB Hellas Athens Vivian Antonopoulou
vantonopoulou@mrb.gr
+30210 6971000 /+306944 414756
India Team C Voter Noida Yashwant Deshmukh
yashwant@teamcvoter.com
+91 120 424 7135
Indonesia DEKA Marketing Research Jakarta Ratna Mulia Darmawan
ratna.darmawan@deka-research.co.id
+62 21 723 6901
Kenya Research Path Associates Ltd. Nairobi Charles Onsongo
charles.onsongo@rpa.co.ke
+254 20 2734770
Nigeria Market Trends Lagos Jo Ebhomenye
joebhomenye@hotmail.com
+234 1734 7384
Pakistan Gallup Pakistan Islamabad Ijaz Shafi Gilani
isb@gallup.com.pk
+92 51 2655630
Peru Datum Lima Urpi Torrado
urpi@datum.com.pe
+511 215 0600
Russia CESSI Institute for Comparative Social Research Moscow Vladimir Andreenkov
vladimir.andreenkov@cessi.ru
+7 495 650 55 18
South Korea East Asia Institute Seoul Wonchil Chung
cwc@eai.or.kr
+82 2 2277 1683
Spain Sigma Dos Int. Madrid Petrana Valentinova
petrana@sigmados.com
+34 91 360 0474
Turkey Yontem Research Consultancy Ltd Istanbul Mehmet Aktulga
mehmet.aktulga@yontemresearch.com
+90 212 278 12 19
United Kingdom Populus Data Solutions London Patrick Diamond
pdiamond@populusdatasolutions.com
+44 207 553 4148
USA GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767

Question Wording

M3A. To what extent do you agree or disagree that the election of a woman as US President would fundamentally change your perception of the United States? READ. CODE ONE.

01 – Strongly agree
02 – Somewhat agree
03 – Somewhat disagree
04 – Strongly disagree
VOLUNTEERED (DO NOT READ)
05 – Depends / neither agree nor disagree
99 – Don’t know / no answer

 

M3B. To what extent do you agree or disagree that the election of a Hispanic American as US President would fundamentally change your perception of the United States? READ. CODE ONE.

01 – Strongly agree
02 – Somewhat agree
03 – Somewhat disagree
04 – Strongly disagree
VOLUNTEERED (DO NOT READ)
05 – Depends / neither agree nor disagree
99 – Don’t know / no answer

 

M4t. As you may know, the American people elected Barack Obama as President in 2008 and again in 2012. In hindsight, do you think this was a very good choice, a somewhat good choice, a somewhat bad choice or a very bad choice? CODE ONLY ONE.

01 – A very good choice
02 – A somewhat good choice
03 – A somewhat bad choice
04 – A very bad choice
VOLUNTEERED (DO NOT READ)
99 – Don’t know / no answer

Global Citizenship A Growing Sentiment Among Citizens Of Emerging Economies: Global Poll

Header---BBC-Press-Releases

Download the Full Report (PDF)

27 April 2016 – For the first time in 15 years of tracking by GlobeScan, findings indicate that nearly one in two people (49%) surveyed across 14 tracking countries see themselves more as global citizens than citizens of their country. This sentiment is being driven by citizens of large emerging economies, according to a new poll for the BBC World Service.

The poll, conducted by GlobeScan among more than 20,000 people worldwide between December 2015 and April 2016, is being released as part of the BBC World Service Identity Season—a Spring season of broadcasts on the World Service’s 27 language services exploring stories about how people identify themselves around the world.

Among all 18 countries where this question was asked in 2016, the poll suggests more than half (51%) see themselves more as global citizens than citizens of their country, against 43 per cent who identify nationally. This is the first time since tracking began in 2001 that there is a global majority who leans this way, and the results in 2016 are driven by strong increases since 2015 in non-OECD countries including Nigeria (73%, up 13 points), China (71%, up 14 points), Peru (70%, up 27 points), and India (67%, up 13 points).

Looking at the 14 tracking countries that have been surveyed repeatedly since 2001, a growing divide appears on the topic of global citizenship between respondents from developing economies and those from industrialised countries. At the height of the financial crisis in 2009, views were fairly similar across the two country groupings, with 48 per cent in seven OECD countries seeing themselves more as global citizens than national, and 45 per cent in seven non-OECD countries. This sentiment has continued to grow at a strong pace since then among respondents in emerging economies to reach a high of 56 per cent in both 2015 and 2016. Conversely in seven OECD countries it has followed an opposite trajectory, dropping to a low of 39 per cent in 2011 and remaining at low levels since (now at 42%). This latter trend has been particularly pronounced in Germany where the poll suggests identification with global citizenship has dropped 13 points since 2009 to only 30 per cent today (the lowest since 2001).

The poll also asked about the level of approval for different demographic developments changing the population make-up of their country, and results indicate public opinion is generally quite supportive of a number of trends shaping global society. In the 19 countries surveyed for this series of questions, three quarters (75%) of respondents approve of intermarriage between different races or ethnic groups, and more than six in ten (63%) approve of immigration from other countries (with 31% disapproving). Similar degrees of openness are observed on accepting refugees, with 62 and 57 per cent respectively supporting their country admitting refugees fleeing conflict generally, and from Syria in particular. On all of these statements, German attitudes stand out due to the unusually high percentage of respondents choosing “neither agree nor disagree,” or that it “depends.” A majority of Germans (54%) nonetheless approves the acceptance of Syrian refugees.

GlobeScan Chairman Doug Miller commented: “The poll’s finding that growing majorities of people in emerging economies identify as global citizens will challenge many people’s (and organisations’) ideas of what the future might look like.”

Other Findings

An additional question on the poll gave respondents a broader range of options to reflect on how they consider their identity. Results reveal the complexity of the issue and show how people can identify in different ways.

When offered a choice between five distinct identities, more than one in two citizens (52%) across 19 countries define their most important identity as citizens of their country, outnumbering those who view themselves as being a world citizen (17%), a resident of their local community (11%), or who identify themselves primarily through their religion (9%), or their race or culture (8%). Out of 19 countries, majorities or strong pluralities in 16 countries describe being a national citizen as the most important feature of their identity. National citizenship is the strongest in Kenya (84%) and Ghana (81%), followed by Russia (70%), Nigeria (68%), and Chile (64%).

Three countries stand out in the way their populations think about self-identity. Spaniards are by far the most likely to identify with world citizenship (54%). For 56 per cent of Indonesians, belonging to their local community is the strongest defining identity. And for Pakistanis, a strong plurality (43%) identify first as a member of their religion.

The results are drawn from a telephone and in-person survey of 20,823 adult citizens across 21 participating countries in total. Not all questions were asked in all countries. The poll was conducted for the BBC World Service between December 2, 2015 and April 15, 2016 by the international opinion research and consultancy firm GlobeScan and its national research partners. Within-country results are considered accurate within +/- 2.8 to 3.7 per cent 19 times out of 20. Urban-only samples were used in Brazil, China, Indonesia, and Kenya.

 

For participating countries and detaild findings, see below. For full methodology, question wording, and research partners, please see the drop-down links at the bottom of this article.


Participating Countries

Urban-only samples were used in Brazil, China, Indonesia, and Kenya.


Detailed Findings


Media Contacts

For media interviews, please contact:


About BBC World Service

BBC World Service is an international multimedia broadcaster, delivering a wide range of language and regional services on radio, TV, online and via wireless handheld devices. It uses multiple platforms to reach its weekly audience of 166 million globally, including shortwave, AM, FM, digital satellite and cable channels. Its news sites include audio and video content and offer opportunities to join the global debate. BBC World Service offers its multilingual radio content to partner FM stations around the world and has numerous partnerships supplying content to news websites, mobile phones and other wireless handheld devices as well as TV channels. For more information, visit bbcworldservice.com

Methodology

In total 20,823 citizens in Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, France, Germany, Ghana, Greece, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru, Russia, South Korea, Spain, the UK, and the United States were interviewed face-to-face or by telephone between December 2, 2015 and April 15, 2016. Polling was conducted by GlobeScan and its research partners in each country.

In Brazil, China, Indonesia, and Kenya, urban samples were used. The margin of error per country ranges from +/- 2.8 to 3.7 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

 

Country
Sample Size (unweighted)
Field dates
Sample frame
Survey methodology
Type of sample
Australia 802 February 29 – March 21, 2016 18+ Telephone National
Brazil 804 January 25 – February 12, 2016 18-69 Face-to-face Urban1
Canada 1020 March 7–24, 2016 18+ Telephone National
Chile 1200 December 2, 2015 – January 5, 2016 18+ Face-to-face National
China 1055 April 2–15, 2016 18+ Telephone Urban2
France 1055 February 22 – March 3, 2016 18+ Telephone National
Germany 1001 February 4–18, 2016 16-70 Telephone National
Ghana 1053 March 16 – April 12, 2016 18-65 Face-to-face National
Greece 704 March 16–28, 2016 18+ Telephone National
India 1269 March 15–30, 2016 18+ Face-to-face National
Indonesia 1000 March 12–26, 2016 18+ Face-to-face Urban3
Kenya 1010 March 4–20, 2016 18+ Face-to-face Urban4
Mexico 999 March 18–22, 2016 18+ Face-to-face National
Nigeria 800 March 9–24, 2016 18+ Face-to-face National
Pakistan 1000 February 19 – March 5, 2016 18+ Face-to-face National
Peru 1205 March 14–27, 2016 18-70 Face-to-face National
Russia 1020 March 9–21, 2016 18+ Face-to-face National
South Korea 1000 March 20–24, 2016 19+ Telephone National
Spain 815 February 29 – March 29, 2016 18+ Telephone National
United Kingdom 1005 February 22 – March 13, 2016 18+ Telephone National
USA 1006 February 29 – March 13, 2016 18+ Telephone National
  1. In Brazil the survey was conducted in Belo Horizonte, Brasília, Curitiba, Goiânia, Porto Alegre, Recife, Rio de Janeiro, Salvador, São Paulo, representing 23 per cent of the national adult population.
  2. In China the survey was conducted in Beijing, Chengdu, Chongqing, Fuzhou, Guangzhou, Hangzhou, Harbin, Hefei, Kunming, Nanning, Shanghai, Shenyang, Taiyuan, Tianjin, Wuhan, Xi’an, Xining, Zhengzhou representing 14 per cent of the national adult population.
  3. In Indonesia the survey was conducted in Bandung, Jakarta, Makassar, Medan, and Surabaya, representing 27 per cent of the national adult population.
  4. In Kenya, the survey was conducted in seven out of the eight former administrative provinces targeting the 45 per cent of the adult population in urban and mixed settlements. The survey sample included urban populations in 30 counties representing 64 per cent of all counties. The counties included in the sample were: Bungoma, Busia, Embu, Kajiado, Kakamega, Kericho, Kiambu, Kilifi, Kirinyaga, Kisii, Kisumu, Kitui, Kwale, Laikipia, Machakos, Marsabit, Meru, Migori, Mombasa, Nairobi, Nakuru, Narok, Nyamira, Nyandarua, Nyeri, Siaya, Trans Nzoia, Turkana, Uasin Gishu, Vihiga.

Research Partners

Country Research Institute Location Contact
Australia GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767
Brazil Market Analysis Florianopolis Fabián Echegaray
fabian@marketanalysis.com.br
+55 48 3364 0000
Canada GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767
Chile Mori Chile Santiago Marta Lagos
mlagos@morichile.cl
+56 2334 4544
China GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767
France Efficience 3 Paris and Rheims Thierry Laurain
thierry.l@efficience3.com
+33 1 4316 5442
Germany Ri*QUESTA GmbH Teningen Bernhard Rieder
riquesta.rieder@t-online.de
+49 7641 93 43 36
Greece MRB Hellas Athens Vivian Antonopoulou
vantonopoulou@mrb.gr
+30210 6971000 /+306944 414756
Ghana Business Interactive Consulting Limited Accra Razaaque Animashaun
info@bigghana.com
+233 302 783140 / +233 302 782892
India Team C Voter Noida Yashwant Deshmukh
yashwant@teamcvoter.com
+91 120 424 7135
Indonesia DEKA Marketing Research Jakarta Ratna Mulia Darmawan
ratna.darmawan@deka-research.co.id
+62 21 723 6901
Kenya Research Path Associates Ltd. Nairobi Charles Onsongo
charles.onsongo@rpa.co.ke
+254 20 2734770
Mexico Parametría Mexico City Francisco Abundis
fabundis@parametria.com.mx
+52 55 2614 0089
Nigeria Market Trends Lagos Jo Ebhomenye
joebhomenye@hotmail.com
+234 1734 7384
Pakistan Gallup Pakistan Islamabad Ijaz Shafi Gilani
isb@gallup.com.pk
+92 51 2655630
Peru Datum Lima Urpi Torrado
urpi@datum.com.pe
+511 215 0600
Russia CESSI Institute for Comparative Social Research Moscow Vladimir Andreenkov
vladimir.andreenkov@cessi.ru
+7 495 650 55 18
South Korea East Asia Institute Seoul Wonchil Chung
cwc@eai.or.kr
+82 2 2277 1683
Spain Sigma Dos Int. Madrid Petrana Valentinova
petrana@sigmados.com
+34 91 360 0474
United Kingdom Populus Data Solutions London Patrick Diamond
pdiamond@populusdatasolutions.com
+44 207 553 4148
USA GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767

Question Wording

Q18jt. Please tell me if you strongly agree, somewhat agree, somewhat disagree, or strongly disagree with each of the following statements. READ AND ROTATE. CODE ONE FOR EACH

jt) I see myself more as a global citizen than a citizen of [COUNTRY].

01 – Strongly agree
02 – Somewhat agree
03 – Somewhat disagree
04 – Strongly disagree
VOLUNTEERED (DO NOT READ)
05 – Depends / neither agree nor disagree
99 – Don’t know / no answer

 

M1. As you may know, there are a number of developments changing the population make-up of [Country]. For each of the following, please tell me if you strongly approve, somewhat approve, somewhat disapprove, or strongly disapprove of it in [Country]. READ AND ROTATE. CODE ONE FOR EACH

a) Intermarriage between different races and ethnic groups

01 – Strongly approve
02 – Somewhat approve
03 – Somewhat disapprove
04 – Strongly disapprove
VOLUNTEERED (DO NOT READ)
05 – Depends on which, what extent
06 – Neither
99 – Don’t know / no answer

b) Immigration from other countries

c) The acceptance of refugees fleeing conflict in other countries

d) The acceptance of refugees fleeing the conflict in Syria

 

M2. Different people identify themselves in different ways. In your own case, would you say your most important identity is as… READ AND ROTATE. CODE ONLY ONE

01 – A member of a religious tradition
02 – A citizen of [Country]
03 – A member of your race or culture
04 – A resident of a community or area (smaller than country)
05 – A citizen of the world
VOLUNTEERED
06 – None of the above, other
99 – Don’t know / no answer

Wealthy Countries Less Concerned about Climate Change: Global Poll

26 November 2015 – Global public concern about climate change has declined over the past six years, especially in industrialized countries, and support for national governments leading on ambitious climate targets at next month’s Paris Climate Conference is down from levels measured prior to the 2009 Copenhagen Summit.

Less than half (48%) of citizens living in industrialized countries (OECD members) now rate climate as a “very serious” problem, down from 63 per cent in 2009. Interestingly, a higher percentage of citizens in non-OECD countries (54%) now rate climate as a “very serious” problem.

Only 8 per cent of citizens across 21 countries polled want their government to oppose any climate deal being reached in Paris. An average of 43 per cent want their government to play a leadership role in setting ambitious targets, while another 40 per cent want their government to take a more moderate approach and support only gradual action.

These are the major climate findings from GlobeScan’s latest 21-country poll, conducted face-to-face or by telephone with a random sample of about 1,000 citizens in each country mainly during January and February 2015, and released here for the first time. The BBC had asked GlobeScan what their long-term polling suggests about public opinion on climate negotiations.

Compared to results of a similar question asked six years ago prior to the Copenhagen Climate Summit, there is less support today for ambitious climate leadership by governments. Support for leadership on ambitious targets has declined in eight countries and only increased in three. Canada, France, Spain, and the UK are the only four countries that today have majorities wanting their government’s leadership on ambitious targets in Paris. Countries with majorities or pluralities favouring a more moderate approach and only gradual action include Mexico, Indonesia, Germany, and China.

The poll findings do suggest that citizens have become significantly more informed about climate change over the past fifteen years, however. Almost twice as many today blame human-caused climate change or rising CO2 levels for extreme weather events, compared to a GlobeScan poll in January 2000. More than seven in ten people now point to human factors, including pollution and other causes, as the reason for extreme weather events when asked without prompting.

Doug Miller, GlobeScan Chairman, says: “Our polling suggests a less supportive public opinion context for a Paris deal this year compared to stronger support that existed prior to the failed Copenhagen Climate Summit in December 2009. Real leadership and effective diplomacy will be needed for success in Paris.”

Research Methodology

A total of 20,043 citizens across some 20 countries were interviewed by telephone or face-to-face between December 2014 and May 2015. Polling was conducted by GlobeScan and its research partners in each country. In certain developing countries, the sample was limited to major urban areas. Some questions were asked to half-samples. The margin of error per country ranges from +/- 3.5 to 6 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

 

For full methodology, question wording, and detailed results, please see the drop-down links at the bottom of this article.

– 30 –

 


 

 


For media interviews, please contact:


Methodology

In total 20,043 citizens in Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, France, Germany, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru, Russia, South Korea, Spain, Turkey, the UK, and the United States were interviewed face-to-face or by telephone between December 5, 2014 and May 7, 2015. Polling was conducted by GlobeScan and its research partners in each country.

In Brazil, China, Indonesia, Kenya, and Turkey, urban samples were used. The margin of error per country ranges from +/- 3.5 to 6 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

 

Country
Sample Size (unweighted)
Field dates
Sample frame
Survey methodology
Type of sample
Australia 802 February 2–28, 2015 18+ Telephone National
Brazil 805 January 18 –February 12, 2015 18-69 Face-to-face Urban1
Canada 1013 February 24 –March 23, 2015 18+ Telephone National
Chile 1200 December 12, 2014 – January 10, 2015 18+ Face-to-face National
China 1000 January 30 – March 10, 2015 18+ Telephone Urban2
France 1006 February 5–18, 2015 18+ Telephone National
Germany 1000 January 26 – February 9, 2015 16-70 Telephone National
Ghana 504 March 23 – April 2, 2015 18-75 Face-to-face National
India 1284 February 21 – March 13, 2015 18+ Face-to-face National
Indonesia 1000 January 26 – February 10, 2015 18+ Face-to-face Urban3
Kenya 1010 February 2–19, 2015 18+ Face-to-face Urban4
Mexico 800 December 13–17, 2014 18+ Face-to-face National
Nigeria 800 February 26 – March 5, 2015 18+ Face-to-face National
Pakistan 1000 January 5–25, 2015 18+ Face-to-face National
Peru 1007 January 24 – February 4, 2015 18+ Face-to-face National
Russia 1007 April 23 – May 7, 2015 18+ Telephone National
South Korea 1000 February 6–9, 2015 19+ Telephone National
Spain 800 February 5–13, 2015 18+ Telephone National
Turkey 1001 December 5–26, 2014 15+ Face-to-face Urban5
United Kingdom 1001 January 27 – February 1, 2015 18+ Telephone National
USA 1003 February 2–28, 2015 18+ Telephone National
  1. In Brazil the survey was conducted in Belo Horizonte, Brasília, Curitiba, Goiânia, Porto Alegre, Recife, Rio de Janeiro, Salvador, São Paulo, representing 23 per cent of the national adult population.
  2. In China the survey was conducted in Beijing, Beiliu, Chengdu, Dujiangyan, Fenyang, Fuyang, Guangzhou, Hangzhou, Manzhouli, Quanzhou, Qujing, Shanghai, Shenyang, Shuangcheng, Wuhan, Xi’an, Xining, and Zhengzhou, representing 64 per cent of the national adult population.
  3. In Indonesia the survey was conducted in Bandung, Jakarta, Makassar, Medan, and Surabaya, representing 27 per cent of the national adult population.
  4. In Kenya the survey was conducted in Kakamega, Kisumu, Machakos, Mombasa, Nairobi, Nakuru, and Nyeri, representing 45 per cent of the national adult population.
  5. In Turkey the survey was conducted in İstanbul, Tekirdağ, Bursa, İzmir, Adana, Samsun, Trabzon, Ankara, Kayseri, Malatya, Diyarbakır, and Erzurum, representing 55 per cent of the national adult population.

Question Wording

ASK TO 50% OF SAMPLE

Q2A. How serious a problem do you consider each of the following issues to be? Is each of the following a very serious problem, somewhat serious problem, not very serious problem or not a serious problem at all?

ct) Climate change or global warming, due to the Greenhouse Effect

01 – Very serious problem

02 – Somewhat serious problem

03 – Not very serious problem

04 – Not a serious problem at all

VOLUNTEERED (DO NOT READ)

99 – Don’t know / No answer

 

ASK TO 50% OF SAMPLE

Q17B. What, if anything, do you think is the major cause of these extreme weather patterns?

DO NOT READ. CODE ONE 

01 – Man-made climate change / carbon dioxide levels / global warming / Greenhouse effect

02 – Air pollution (in general)

03 – Ozone hole / ozone layer depletion

04 – Forest practices

05 – Other man-made changes / environmental pollution (general) / human carelessness / other human factors

06 – Natural changes / cycles of Nature / random factors / other natural factors (e.g. volcanic eruptions)

07 – El Nino / la Nina

08 – Spiritual / religious factors / Biblical predictions

97 – Other (Do not specify)

98 – Not asked

99 – Don’t know / No answer

 

ASK TO 100% OF SAMPLE

Q20. In December 2015, countries from around the world, including [COUNTRY], will meet in Paris to discuss how they can work together to reduce emissions of gases that cause climate change.

Which of the following do you think should be [COUNTRY’s] strategy at this meeting?

READ CODE ONE ONLY

01 – Play a leadership role in setting ambitious targets to address climate change as quickly as possible.

02 – Take a more moderate approach and support only gradual action to address climate change.

03 – Do not agree to any international agreement that addresses climate change.

VOLUNTEERED

04 – Depends

99 – Don’t know / No answer

Research Partners

Country Research Institute Location Contact
Australia GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767
Brazil Market Analysis Florianopolis Fabián Echegaray
fabian@marketanalysis.com.br
+55 48 3364 0000
Canada GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767
Chile Mori Chile Santiago Marta Lagos
mlagos@morichile.cl
+56 2334 4544
China GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767
France Efficience 3 Paris and Rheims Thierry Laurain
thierry.l@efficience3.com
+33 1 4316 5442
Germany Ri*QUESTA GmbH Teningen Bernhard Rieder
riquesta.rieder@t-online.de
+49 7641 93 43 36
Ghana Business Interactive Consulting Limited Accra Razaaque Animashaun
info@bigghana.com
+233 302 783140 / +233 302 782892
India Team C Voter Noida Yashwant Deshmukh
yashwant@teamcvoter.com
+91 120 424 7135
Indonesia DEKA Marketing Research Jakarta Ratna Mulia Darmawan
ratna.darmawan@deka-research.co.id
+62 21 723 6901
Kenya Research Path Associates Ltd. Nairobi Charles Onsongo
charles.onsongo@rpa.co.ke
+254 20 2734770
Mexico Parametría Mexico City Francisco Abundis
fabundis@parametria.com.mx
+52 55 2614 0089
Nigeria Market Trends Lagos Jo Ebhomenye
joebhomenye@hotmail.com
+234 1734 7384
Pakistan Gallup Pakistan Islamabad Ijaz Shafi Gilani
isb@gallup.com.pk
+92 51 2655630
Peru Datum Lima Urpi Torrado
urpi@datum.com.pe
+511 215 0600
Russia CESSI Institute for Comparative Social Research Moscow Vladimir Andreenkov
vladimir.andreenkov@cessi.ru
+7 495 650 55 18
South Korea East Asia Institute Seoul Wonchil Chung
cwc@eai.or.kr
+82 2 2277 1683
Spain Sigma Dos Int. Madrid Petrana Valentinova
petrana@sigmados.com
+34 91 360 0474
Turkey Yöntem Research Consultancy Ltd. Istanbul Mehmet Aktulga
mehmet.aktulga@yontemresearch.com
+90 212 278 12 19
United Kingdom Populus Data Solutions London Patrick Diamond
pdiamond@populusdatasolutions.com
+44 207 553 4148
USA GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767

Negative Views of Russia on the Rise: Global Survey

Header---BBC-Press-Releases

Download the Full Report (PDF)

The poll also finds that views of the United States have worsened around the world, led by sharp increases in negative views among citizens of Spain (up 19 points), Germany (up 18 points) and Brazil (up 15 points).

Views of the EU have also eroded, with perceptions of the institution being at their worst globally since the poll began and among European citizens in Spain, Germany, and France. In these three countries, negative ratings have increased (by respectively 19, 10, and 7 points), and positive ratings have simultaneously dropped (down 15, 11, and 5 points).

Meanwhile, Germany has kept its position as the most positively viewed country, with 60 per cent worldwide giving it positive ratings. As in 2013, it is followed by Canada (57%), and the UK (56%).

Avg of 21 Countries

 

The UK is the country whose perceived influence in the world has most improved from 2005 to the present. Positive views towards the UK have gone up six points, from 52 to 58 per cent on average across the long-term tracking countries surveyed since the beginning of the poll. Negative ratings have simultaneously dropped eight points, from 29 to 21 per cent. Conversely, China’s perceived influence has worsened the most over the same decade.

The Country Ratings Poll of 24 nations, entering its 10th consecutive year, was conducted by GlobeScan/PIPA among 24,542 people around the world between December 2013 and April 2014. It asked respondents to rate 16 countries and the EU on whether their influence in the world is “mostly positive” or “mostly negative.”

Negative views of Russia now average 45 per cent across the countries polled in 2013 and 2014. They largely outweigh positive views (31%), and have gone up four points since 2013. The worsening opinion of Russia is a general trend observed in many different countries across all continents, led by Kenya (up 16 points), Spain (up 15 points), Brazil (up 13 points), and Canada (up 12 points).

In addition to Spain, Germany, and Brazil, views of the USA have also declined in Canada, and, more sharply, among traditionally-friendly African countries. On average, positive views of the USA across the tracking countries have dropped three points to 42 per cent while negative views have risen by four points to reach 39 per cent. This is the third consecutive year that the perceived influence of the USA has worsened.

Japan has continued its downward movement. In 2012 Japan was the most positively rated country, while in 2013 it dropped to fourth place with an average seven-point decline in positive ratings. This year Japan has dropped two more points (49% of positive views) and is now in fifth place among all nations assessed. Negative views of Japan are at their highest since 2006, and have hit a record high of 90 per cent among Chinese (up from 74%).

GlobeScan’s Lionel Bellier commented: “It is probably not a coincidence that the nations that showed the sharpest increases in negative views of the United States—Spain, Germany, and Brazil—are ones where extensive US surveillance activity has been discovered and widely criticized.”

Steven Kull, Director of PIPA, commented: “Though the polling period mostly pre-dated the action in Crimea and overlapped the Sochi games and the freeing of Khodorkovsky and the Pussy Riot members, it was also a period during which Putin had pressed Ukraine to not move toward the EU, and when the first riots took place in the streets of Kiev.”

Other Key Findings

Negative views of the USA are also up in all three African countries surveyed—up 13 points in Kenya, ten points in Ghana, and seven points in Nigeria. The proportions of positive ratings in these three countries have concurrently decreased averages of two digits.

Perceptions of the EU had stabilised in 2013 after the big drop in positive views that occurred in 2012, but the declining trend has resumed again this year. Forty-seven per cent respondents in tracking countries feel that the EU has a positive influence. This is down two points, while negative ratings have simultaneously gone up by two points (now 27%). Views of the global public towards the EU are at their worst since the poll began.

Negative views of Japan have grown particularly stark among some of its key East Asian neighbours. In China, over the last year, negative ratings have gone up 16 points to an astonishing 90 per cent. In South Korea, negative views have risen 12 points to almost four in five (79%). In these two countries, the negative sentiment is at its highest since 2006.

Several of the BRICS countries (Russia notwithstanding) that saw their ratings decline strongly last year have corrected in a positive way in 2014. For South Africa there was a five-point increase in positive ratings among tracking countries surveyed both in 2013 and 2014 (up to 39%), making it the most improved nation. The situation has also improved in India (38% of positive views, up 4 points) and China (42%, up 2 points).

Iran remains the most unfavourably viewed country, with negative ratings of its perceived influence averaging 60 per cent, followed by Pakistan and North Korea (both 58%). Israel continues to be the fourth most negatively viewed nation, despite an uptick of three points in its positive ratings (24%) and a decline in its negative ratings to 50 per cent (down 2 points) that differentiates it from the other worst-rated nations.

 

A total of 24,542 citizens across 24 countries were interviewed face-to-face or by telephone between December 17, 2013 and April 28, 2014. Polling was conducted for BBC World Service by the international polling firm GlobeScan and its research partners in each country, together with the Program on International Policy Attitudes (PIPA) at the University of Maryland. Countries were rated by half samples in all countries polled except for Argentina and Japan. In five of the 24 countries, the sample was limited to major urban areas. The margin of error per country ranges from +/- 2.5 to 6.1 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

 

For full methodology, question wording, and detailed results, including region-by-region data for all key questions, please see the drop-down links at the bottom of this article.

 

For more details, please visit www.GlobeScan.com or www.WorldPublicOpinion.org as well as the GlobeScan Blog http://www.globescan.com/news-and-analysis/blog.html

– 30 –

 


Participating Countries

Participating Countries

In Brazil, China, Indonesia, Kenya, and Turkey, urban samples were used.


Long-Term Trends

The BBC Country Ratings Poll is marking its tenth anniversary this year. Looking back at a decade of ratings, some broad trends are clearly identifiable as to how some countries are being viewed globally in terms of their world influence. The charts on the next page show these long-term trends among a set of 11 long-term tracking countries (i.e. only those in which the survey has been conducted every year since 2005, meaning that the average figures quoted will differ from the figures quoted elsewhere in this document).

Over the past decade, the country whose perceived influence in the world has most improved is the UK. From 2005 to the present, positive views towards the country have gone up six points, from 52 to 58 per cent on average across the long-term tracking countries. Over the same time, negative views have followed a reversed trend, decreasing from 29 to 21 per cent.

Conversely, the country whose influence in the world has worsened the most over the past decade is China. In 2005 positive views were held by nearly half (48%) and strongly outweighed negative views (32%), but since then perceptions have flipped: positive views have dropped 13 points to 35 per cent in 2014 and are now eclipsed by negative views (49%, up 17 points).

The long-term trend of perceptions of Russia is also down sharply. Neutral in 2005 with as many positive ratings as negative ones (39%), views have since gradually worsened. The proportion of negative ratings has risen 12 points to 51 per cent over the past decade and now far outweighs the proportion of those with positive perceptions, which has dropped eight points to 31 per cent.

The long-term trends of the EU and Japan over the past decade have followed relatively similar, broken trajectories. Faring both consistently quite high in terms of positive views from 2006 up until 2011 for the EU (57%), and up until 2012 for Japan (58%), their perceived world influence has seen a continuous decline since then to reach record lows in 2014 in terms of positive ratings (46% in the EU, 48% in Japan). At the same time the proportion of those with negative ratings has hit record highs in 2014, going up 11 points since 2006 in the case of the EU to reach 30 per cent in 2014, and eight points in the case of Japan to reach 32 per cent in 2014.

Perceptions of the USA were in majority negative from 2005 until 2007 when negative views of the country significantly outnumbered positive ones: a record high of 58 per cent of respondents had unfavourable attitudes towards the USA. A durable recovery started in 2008, lasting over the course of Obama’s first term up until 2012 when positive views were at a high (44%, up 19 points since 2007) and outnumbered negative ratings concurrently at a low (38%). However, the reputation of the USA has receded in the past three years and overall, over the decade, while negative views of the USA have softened and dropped five points between 2005 (52%) and 2014 (47%), positive views have merely gone up two points to 36 per cent in 2014.

 

Views of Different Countries - PT1

Views of Different Countries - PT2

Evolution of Perceived Influence


Media Contacts

For media interviews, please contact:

  • Steven Kull, Director, Program on International Policy Attitudes, Washington

About The Program on International Policy Attitudes (PIPA)

The Program on International Policy Attitudes (PIPA) of the Center for International and Security Studies at the University of Maryland, undertakes research on attitudes in publics around the world on a variety of international issues and manages the international research project. For more information, visit: www.WorldPublicOpinion.org

About BBC World Service

BBC World Service is an international multimedia broadcaster, delivering a wide range of language and regional services on radio, TV, online and via wireless handheld devices. It uses multiple platforms to reach its weekly audience of 166 million globally, including shortwave, AM, FM, digital satellite and cable channels. Its news sites include audio and video content and offer opportunities to join the global debate. BBC World Service offers its multilingual radio content to partner FM stations around the world and has numerous partnerships supplying content to news websites, mobile phones and other wireless handheld devices as well as TV channels. For more information, visit: www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice

Backgrounder: Region-by-Region Results

The following sections examine in detail the poll results for each of the countries rated.

The United States

USA

Global views of the USA have declined sharply in 2014. On average, in the 20 tracking countries1 surveyed both in 2013 and 2014, 42 per cent of respondents hold positive views of the US influence in the world, while 39 per cent hold negative views. This represents a substantial decline since 2013, with positive views decreasing by three points and negative views increasing by four points—the highest increase in the survey along with Russia. This is the third consecutive year that perceptions of the US influence worsened.

In terms of positive views, the USA still ranks eighth out of 17 countries rated, including the EU. Of the 23 countries surveyed about the USA’s influence in 2014, 12 countries hold positive views, nine hold negative views, and two are divided (Turkey and Australia).

The deterioration of views towards the USA is mostly led by sharp increases in negative views among allies where extensive US surveillance activity has been discovered and widely criticized. Somewhat divided in 2013, the German opinion has moved firmly in negative territories following an 18-point increase in negative ratings (up to 57%, the third-most negative attitude towards the USA in the survey) combined with a 14-point decrease in positive views (down to 21%). Unfavourable views have also surged 19 points in Spain and the country’s opinion has now shifted from leaning largely positively in 2013 to being somewhat negative in 2014 (39% positive vs 44% negative). Perceptions have also cooled down significantly in Brazil with negative views going up 15 points and favourable ratings decreasing by eight points. However, there is still a majority of Brazilians who view the American influence positively (51% positive vs 38% negative).

Perceptions of the USA have also worsened sharply among traditionally friendly African countries. Negative ratings are up 13 points in Kenya, ten points in Ghana, and seven points in Nigeria, and the proportions of positive ratings in these three countries have concurrently decreased averages of two digits. However, strong majorities remain favourable overall (69% in Ghana, 59% in Nigeria, and 55% in Kenya)—and the most favourable in the survey for Ghana.

Opinions of the USA have become less favourable among neighbouring countries as well. In Canada, the public has shifted from being divided in 2013 to leaning negatively (43% positive vs 52% negative) this year following a seven-point increase in negative ratings. The same shift happened in Mexico where the population is now leaning somewhat negatively (35% positive vs 41% negative). Surveyed for the first time in 2014, respondents in Argentina mostly lean negative as well (29% positive vs 39% negative).

In Europe, France and the UK buck the worsening trend seen among the Germans and the Spaniards. A stable majority of French (51%) remain positive towards the American influence while perceptions have nicely improved in the UK where the opinion has shifted from being divided in 2013 (46% positive vs 46% negative) to leaning positively this year (52% positive vs 42% negative). In peripheral Europe, views have warmed among the Turks, with negative ratings dropping 23 points and positive ratings going up by nine points, making the opinion shift from leaning negatively in 2013 to being divided in 2014 (36% positive vs 36% negative). Surveyed for the first time this year, Israel holds very warm views towards its closest ally: six in ten Israelis (60%) have favourable attitudes of the USA, the second highest percentage after Ghana.

In Asia, views have remained stable but are quite diverse. South Koreans are the most favourable towards the USA, with 58 per cent posting positive ratings of the American influence. In India and Japan, pluralities lean positively (42% and 37%, respectively), though a majority of Japanese is in fact undecided (54%). A stable plurality in Indonesia leans negatively (47%), while the most unfavourable views towards the USA in the survey are held in Pakistan (61%) and China (59%).

1All quoted tracking averages exclude the views of the nation being rated by itself, where applicable. They reflect the averages shown on the global tracking chart on page 4 and are therefore different than the 2014 global averages shown on each of the per-country charts (which include all 2014 participating countries).

 


 

Russia

Russia

Views of Russia have continued to deteriorate strongly over the past year. In the 20 tracking countries surveyed both in 2013 and 2014, negative ratings have jumped four points to 45 per cent. This is the highest increase in negative ratings in the survey with the USA. At the same time, the proportion giving positive ratings to the Russian influence in the world has remained stable and low at 31 per cent. In terms of the proportion of positive views, Russia remains the fifth worst rated country.

Of the 23 countries surveyed in 2014, only six lean positive, 15 lean negative, and two are divided (Peru and Turkey).

The worsening opinion of Russia is a general trend observed in many different countries across all continents. Perceptions have become more negative in 13 countries polled, and are now at their lowest at a global level on average since the survey started.

Europe appears as the region where the most unfavourable views are found. Negative perceptions have increased by six points in France and Germany to respectively 69 and 67 per cent (the highest and third highest proportions in the survey), and by 7 points in the UK (64%, and the fourth highest proportion). Feelings have become frankly more dire among Spaniards as well with 58 per cent who hold negative views (up 15 points) and 18 per cent only who lean favourably (down 12 points, and the third lowest proportion of positive ratings in the survey). With 68 per cent of negative ratings, newly surveyed Israel holds the second worst views towards Russia after France. Turkey is bucking this unfavourable trend as the perceived world influence of Russia is seen more positively there than before there. Thanks to a drop of 13 points in negative ratings combine with a six-point increase in positive ratings, the Turkish opinion has shifted from leaning negatively in 2013 to being divided this year (36% positive vs 33% negative).

In the Americas, the situation has also deteriorated though there are some stark differences between North and South. In North America, views are strongly negative with 64 per cent of Americans holding negative perceptions of Russia’s influence (up 5 points) and a similar proportion in Canada (62%, up 12 points). In Latin America, a stronger plurality leans negative in Brazil (43% negative, up 13 points) despite a ten-point increase in positive ratings (now at 35%). Positive perceptions have cooled down in Chile and Mexico where the opinions are narrowly positive only (33% positive vs 28% negative in Chile and 35% positive vs 29% negative in Mexico). Peru is bucking this trend as the only country in the region with improved views: from leaning negatively in 2013 (25% positive vs 34% negative), the Peruvians are now divided (34% positive vs 30% negative). Apart from Brazil, the other countries surveyed in this region have high proportions of undecided respondents when it comes to assessing Russia’s world influence (between 36% and 39%).

In the African surveyed countries, attitudes have become more negative as well but views in Ghana diverge compared to respondents in Kenya and Nigeria. Though slightly decreasing, a majority of Ghanaians continue to lean favourably towards Russia (50%, the third highest proportion in the survey). However, in Kenya, the opinion has shifted from leaning positively in 2013 to being divided in 2014 (29% positive vs 39% negative) following a 16-point increase in negative ratings. The shift in opinions is also marked in Nigeria where the public was divided in 2013: close to a majority of Nigerians are now holding negative views (48%, up 6 points) as opposed to just 30 per cent of positive views (down 12 points).

In Asia, views among the two BRIC peers are positive. The Chinese in particular have warmed up towards their neighbour with 55 per cent posting favourable ratings (up 11 points). Out of Russians’ ratings of their own country, China is the most favourable towards Russia among all countries surveyed.

Elsewhere in Asia, views continue to be mostly unfavourable in Pakistan (47% and stable), Indonesia (49%, up 6 points), and South Korea (46%, up 6 points). A very small plurality leans negatively in Japan (23%) but six in ten Japanese are unable to take any side. With 59 per cent of negative ratings (up 6 points), Australia is more aligned with its occidental counterparts in Europe and North America in the way it views Russia’s influence.

 


 

 

Germany

Germany

Germany has kept its position of the most favourably viewed nation in 2014. On average, in the 20 tracking countries surveyed both in 2013 and 2014, 60 per cent of people rate Germany positively. This is the highest percentage out of all countries evaluated and is one percentage point higher than in 2013. At the same time however, negative views towards Germany have increased by three points globally, up to 18 per cent. Of the 23 countries polled in 2014, all lean positive except for two, these being Spain, where the opinion is divided, and Israel.

Apart from Spain, perceptions of Germany in the other EU countries surveyed are very favourable. The most positive ratings are found in the UK where 86 per cent of respondents lean positively (up 8 points and the highest proportion in the survey with Australia). With 83 per cent of positive ratings, neighbouring France is the second most favourable country towards Germany’s influence. In peripheral Europe, a solid and stable majority of Russians (57%) hold favourable perceptions of Germany, while a stable plurality in Turkey does too (47%). Spain is the only country where opinions have reversed, quite strikingly. Following a 24-point plunge in positive ratings entirely converted in negative ratings (up 27 points), the Spanish opinion has shifted from leaning strongly positively in 2013 (68% positive vs 13% negative) to being divided in 2014 (44% positive vs 40% negative). Incidentally, the proportion of negative ratings in Spain is by far the highest in the survey, with Israel the only country that trails it narrowly with 38 per cent of unfavourable ratings. Israel is the only country whose overall opinion towards Germany is negative as just a quarter of respondents (25%) hold positive views.

In North America, attitudes towards Germany’s influence in the world are very positive, with 73 per cent of favourable views held among American respondents and a growing majority of 77 per cent in Canada (up 8 points).

In the African countries surveyed, favourable perceptions also continue to prevail, though more moderately this year in Ghana and Nigeria. Just over seven in ten Ghanaians (72%) give positive ratings to Germany, which is down 12 points since 2013. Positive perceptions have dropped six points in Nigeria (down to 63%) and almost a quarter of Nigerians feel negative (23%, up 5 points). Bucking this soft landing trend, perceptions in Kenya have improved with a growing majority of Kenyans posting positive ratings (58%, up 6 points).

Feelings toward Germany in Latin America are mixed with a nice improvement seen in Brazil, but a deterioration has taken place in Chile and Mexico. Positive views have increased an average of 13 per cent among Brazilians (up to 66%) and Brazil is now the most favourable towards Germany in the region. In Chile and Mexico, comfortable majorities holding favourable views in 2013 have become pluralities only following an 11-point drop in positive ratings in both countries (down to 47% in Chile and 43% in Mexico).

In Asia, the most favourable views towards Germany are found among the OECD countries. With 86 per cent of the public leaning positively (up 10 points), Australia is the best supporter of Germany (equally with the UK), closely followed by South Korea (84%, up 8 points). Although one in two in Japan is unable to take a side, a very strong plurality of Japanese holds positive feelings (46%) and the country has the lowest proportion of negative ratings (3%).

Elsewhere in Asia, views remain positive but have moderated in Indonesia (53% positive ratings, down 7 points) and in China (42%, down 6 points). Respondents in India are more polarised than last year following a 12-point increase in negative ratings and are now somewhat positive (32% positive vs 26% negative). Attitudes in neighbouring Pakistan have warmed following a 6-point increase in positive ratings, making the opinion shift from being divided in 2013 to leaning positively in 2014 (35% positive vs 27% negative) for the first time since Pakistan took part in the survey in 2010.

 


 

Canada

Canada

Global views of Canada have remained stable and very positive overall in 2014. On average, in the 20 tracking countries polled in 2013 and 2014, 57 per cent of people on average have positive views of Canadian influence in the world (56% in 2013), and 15 per cent hold negative views (down 1 point). In terms of positive views, Canada continues to rank in second place out of all countries rated, behind Germany. Of the 23 countries that have evaluated Canada in 2014, all are on balance positive about Canada’s influence.

The sentiment towards Canada is positive in different countries on different continents, but the most favourable views about Canada are found among traditional allies. France is the best advocate of Canada in 2014, with 87 per cent of French giving positive ratings to Canada’s influence in the world (up 5 points). It is closely followed by neighbouring Americans (86%), the UK (85%, up 5 points), and Australia (83%).

In Africa, Ghanaians hold strong favourable views (78% and up 7 points). The pictures are also positive in Nigeria and in Kenya, though more moderate, with a stable majority of 53 per cent of Nigerians who lean positively and a plurality of 46 per cent among Kenyans. In Kenya, however, negative perceptions have increased by nine points up to 22 per cent.

In Asia, South Koreans hold strong and stable favourable views (78%). Views are also firmly entrenched in positive territory in China (63%, up 8 points) and in Japan (44% positive vs 1% negative). In the rest of Asia, the publics are all positive, though not in the same proportions. A small plurality of Indians leans positive (31%, up 5 points) against the 21 per cent who lean negative (up 8 points). Four in ten in Indonesians (40%) have favourable attitudes, but this proportion has dropped nine points since 2013 and negative views have risen 12 points (28%). In Pakistan, perceptions have continued to improve for the fourth consecutive year. Thirty-six per cent of Pakistanis give positive ratings to Canada’s influence in the world. This represents a nine-point increase and for the first time since Pakistan took part in the survey, a plurality is now leaning favourably towards Canada (36% positive vs 25% negative).

In the EU countries, attitudes among Spaniards and Germans remain strongly in positive territory but are more muted than in France and the UK. Over six in ten in Spain (62%) hold favourable views of Canada, but the proportion has dropped 12 points over the past year. Following the sudden cooling in views in Germany in 2013, a stable majority of Germans feels positive in 2014 (53%), but the proportion of those with negative feelings has gone up nine points to 20 per cent.

At the periphery of Europe, an increased proportion of Russians is rating Canada positively (47%, up 7 points), but the public in Turkey has become more undecided about Canada’s perceived influence: positive ratings have dropped ten points to 33 per cent, and a double digit decrease in negative ratings (15%, down 19 points) leaves a majority of undecided respondents overall. Surveyed for the first time, respondents in Israel have very warm feelings of Canadians (56% positive vs 4% negative).

Views of Canada in the Latin American countries surveyed are all favourable as well. One in two in Brazil (50%, stable) rates Canada positively – but the proportion of negative ratings has increased by nine points (up to 26%). Solid and stable pluralities continue to lean positively in Peru (48%) and Mexico (42%), and negative ratings among Mexicans have dropped six points over the past year (down to 21%). Asked to rate Canada for the first time this year, 36 per cent of Argentinians rate it favourably but one in two (50%) does not have a clear opinion on the matter.

 


 

The European Union

EU

Perceptions of the EU had stabilised in 2013 after the big drop in positive views that occurred in 2012, but the declining trend has resumed this year again. On average, in the 21 tracking countries polled in 2013 and 2014, 47 per cent respondents feel positive about the EU’s global influence. This is down two points, while negative ratings have simultaneously gone up by two points to reach 27 per cent.

Of the 23 countries surveyed in 2014, almost all lean positive (20 countries) however, overall, views of the global public towards the EU are at their worst since the first ratings of the institution in 2006. One country leans negative (Pakistan), and two are divided (China and India).

The most positive views of the EU are found in different countries around the world. Ghana holds the most favourable attitudes with 75 per cent rating the European institution positively. South Koreans are the second most positive with 70 per cent of friendly ratings (up 5 points), followed by Canada where views have warmed greatly and positive ratings gaining 13 points, up to 64 per cent.

In the EU countries surveyed, though positive overall, views have worsened quite noticeably. Sixty-three per cent of French lean positively towards the institution—the highest proportion among EU members, although the French sentiment has cooled perceptibly and is at its lowest since 2006. Positive ratings have never been so low (down 5 points) and negative ratings never so high (30%, up 7 points). The same low point situations are seen in Spain and Germany. Following a 15-point drop in positive ratings, for the first time, less than one in two (45%) among Spaniards feel positive about the EU, and over one in three leans negatively (32%, up 19 points). For the second year in a row, support for the EU among the Germans has eroded seriously, dropping 11 points and leaving only a plurality to rate the EU positively (48% and less than one in two for the first time since 2006). Negative ratings are also at their highest with 31 per cent (up 10 points). The British are surprisingly bucking this negative trend among EU members. Holding negative feelings overall for the first time in 2013 (42% positive vs 47% negative), the opinion has shifted back into positive territory following a 10-point increase in positive ratings (52%) and a six-point drop in negative ratings (41%). The British opinion remains nevertheless strongly polarised with the highest proportion of unfavourable views out of all countries surveyed.

As in the UK, views of the EU among Americans have warmed and retrieved an absolute majority of positive ratings lost in 2013 (52%, up 6 points). The same pattern is also observed in Australia where the opinion has shifted back into positive territory after two consecutive years of being divided and following a 12-point drop in negative ratings (now 30%) entirely converted in positive views (54% positive, up 13 points).

In peripheral Europe, the opinion in Turkey has shifted from leaning negatively in 2013 (38% positive vs 46% negative) to leaning positively this year following a 21-point drop in negative views (39% positive vs 25% negative). In Israel, a plurality of 41 per cent leans positive, while views among Russians have deteriorated slightly, though remaining favourable overall (37% positive vs 23% negative).

Among the BRIC countries, apart from previously mentioned Russia, views are following a worsening trend. Close to a majority in Brazil (49%, stable) are supportive of the EU’s influence in the world but negative perceptions have gone up 11 points (31%). In India, the decline is more pronounced, with positive ratings dropping six points to 27 per cent and negative ratings rising nine points (30%). As a result, the Indian opinion has shifted from leaning positively in 2013 to being divided in 2014. The cooling is also marked among the Chinese public where positive feelings have hit a bottom low (32%, down 8 points) and negative ratings a record high (34%, up 6 points). For the first time since they are asked to rate the EU’s global influence, the Chinese appear as divided.

Apart from Ghana, views in the two other African countries surveyed have declined significantly. A 52-per cent majority still leans favourably towards the EU among Kenyans, but this has dropped eight points over the past year while negative have gone up 15 points at the same time (up to 27%). Less than one in two Nigerians have supportive views of the EU this year (48%)—this is down ten points compared to 2013 and the drop has all been converted into a rise of negative ratings (37%, up 11 points). Both in Nigeria and Ghana, perceptions of the EU are their worst since 2006.

In Latin America, a stable majority of Peruvians gives positive ratings to the EU (51% positive vs 17% negative). In Argentina and Mexico, respective pluralities of 32 and 37 per cent lean favourably, but an increased proportion of Mexicans proves to be undecided about their mood towards the EU.

In Asia, views among Japanese citizens have remained stable in terms of positive ratings (35%) and negative ratings have dropped six points to just about 5 per cent. Perceptions in Indonesia have eroded: a plurality remains positive (40%) but this is down ten points compared to 2013, and with 33 per cent of negative ratings (up 11 points), Indonesians have never had such high unfavourable views towards the EU. Pakistan remains the least favourable towards the EU out of all the countries surveyed, with less than a quarter of respondents (24%, stable) rating the EU positively and 39 per cent who rate it negatively.

 


 

The United Kingdom

UK

 

Views of the UK have remained amongst the most favourable overall in 2014 and fairly stable with the glowing picture that was observed in 2013. On average, in the 20 tracking countries surveyed both in 2013 and 2014, 56 per cent say that British influence is positive (one point higher than in 2013). Over the same period, negative opinions have increased two points to 21 per cent. Britain continues to be ranked third in terms of its perceived positive influence in the world, behind Germany and Canada. In the 23 countries surveyed this year, all countries but one lean positive towards the UK. As in 2013, Pakistan is divided.

The most favourable attitudes toward the UK are found in fellow Anglophone North America, where the proportions of respondents giving positive ratings to the UK’s global influence have grown stronger and never been so high since the poll began in 2005. They represent 81 per cent in the USA and 80 per cent in Canada and have increased respectively seven and 11 points over the past year. Negative ratings from Canadians have simultaneously dropped six points (9% in 2014). Australians also hold stronger positive views of the UK: the 2013 drop in favourable ratings has been cancelled and supportive views are now back to their 2012 level, with a12-point increase in positive ratings (73%) combined to a seven-point drop in negative ratings (18%).

Perceptions continue to be also very favourable in Sub-Saharan Africa. Ghanaians are again the most supportive of the British influence out of the three African countries surveyed (and the third most supportive in the whole survey) with almost eight in ten respondents holding positive views (78%). This proportion is ten points lower than in 2013 however, and the proportion of those leaning negatively is slightly on the rise, although still very low (9%, up 6 points). Views among Nigerians have moderated a little with 67 per cent rating the UK positively (down 8 points), while attitudes among Kenyans have remained stable and very favourable (74% positive).

In Europe, all EU countries continue to rate British influence positively but the situation is much contrasted. Positive views in France have maintained the bullish trend started in 2013, and with 72 per cent of favourable views (up 8 points), the French mood towards their neighbour across the Channel has never been so high. This positive picture contrasts with that in Germany where a majority rates the UK positively (51%), but where a 15-point increase in negative ratings (34% and highest proportion since the poll began) has led the German public opinion to become much more polarised in its views of the UK. The outlook is much grimmer in Spain as well: favourable attitudes have plummeted to 41 per cent, registering a 25-point drop almost entirely converted in increased negative ratings (36%, up 22 points).

At the periphery of Europe, Turkey is bucking this negative movement as the country’s opinion shifted from leaning negatively in 2013 (31% positive vs 40% negative) to leaning positively this year (39% positive vs 30% negative). Views in Russia have remained stable (44% positive) while in Israel, one in two respondents (50%) has a friendly attitude towards the UK.

In Latin American countries surveyed, pluralities within 40 and 45 per cent view British influence positively, but the public opinion has evolved differently in the surveyed countries. Brazilians have become more assertive in their views of the UK’s global influence, with improved positive ratings (45%, up 12 points) but also increased negative perceptions (25%, up 6 points). In Peru, perceptions have become much more supportive due to an 11-point rise in positive views (41% and highest proportion since Peru takes part in the survey). In Chile, the mood is not as warm as it was last year with positive ratings dropping ten points to 45 per cent, while a stable plurality among Mexicans (40%) leans favourably.

In Asia, besides Australia, the most favourable ratings of the UK’s global influence are found among South Koreans (74%, up 7 points) and Indonesians (59%, but down 6 points). In Japan, a stable and very strong plurality of 47 per cent is supportive of British world influence.

Perceptions in the two emerging giants of the region have cooled quite firmly in 2014, though still remaining in positive territory. At a zenith in 2013 since the poll began in 2005, positive ratings among Indians have dropped six points to 43 per cent this year and negative ratings have climbed 11 points to 27 per cent. In China, negative ratings remained stable at 26 per cent but positive feelings about the UK have decreased to 39 per cent only (down 9 points) and are at their lowest since 2005.

In Pakistan, the public remains mostly divided although the proportion of respondents holding positive views of the UK has continuously improved since Pakistan started to take part in the survey in 2010. Thirty-nine per cent of Pakistanis give positive ratings to the UK, but this is not enough yet to make the overall opinion shift firmly into positive territory (39% positive vs 35% negative).

 


 

Japan

Japan

Global views of Japan have continued to follow a downward movement in 2014. On average, in the 20 tracking countries surveyed both in 2013 and 2014, 49 per cent hold positive views of Japan, which represents a two-point drop since 2013. At the same time, negative views have gone up two more points to reach 30 per cent. In 2012, Japan was the most positively rated country, while in 2013 it dropped to fourth place. This year Japan has lost another rank in the table of most positively rated countries and is now in fifth place. Despite this, the spread by country continues to show that almost all publics in the surveyed countries lean favourably towards Japan: out of the 23 countries surveyed in 2014, 19 lean positive, three lean negative, and one is divided (India).

As in 2013, the most favourable views of Japan are found among Nigerians and Indonesians although with a stable proportion of positive views (72%), Nigeria is just ahead of Indonesia where attitudes towards Japan have cooled a bit (70%, down 12 points). Brazil also continues to hold strong positive views (70%, stable) despite a nine-point uptick in negative ratings (up to 19%).

All surveyed publics in Latin America have favourable perceptions of Japan, though to a much lesser extent than Brazilians. A comfortable majority of Peruvians posts favourable ratings, but the proportion has decreased somewhat (59%, down 5 points). Asked to rate their perceptions of the Japanese influence for the first time, Argentineans lean nicely positively (43% positive vs 16% negative). In Mexico, the mood has warmed due to a 13-point drop in negative ratings, making the opinion shift from being divided in 2013 (42% positive vs 38% negative) to leaning positively this year (38% positive vs 25% negative).

In North America, comfortable majorities of Americans (66%) and Canadians (58%) think positively of Japan. In Canada, however, the opinion has reached a low point since Japan started to be evaluated in 2006. Positive ratings have remained fairly stable (down 3 points), but are still at their lowest, while a seven-point increase in negative ratings (30%) has pushed to a record high since 2006.

Among countries surveyed in Asia, views are quite diverse. After Indonesia, Australia is the warmest country in the region towards Japan with 59 per cent of positive views (up 6 points) and 29 per cent of negative views (down 7 points). Views in Pakistan have remained stable and favourable with close to a majority giving positive ratings (46%). Elsewhere in Asia, however, perceptions have become much grimmer and have partially driven the continuous decline in views of Japan globally. In India the public mood has shifted from leaning positively in 2013 to being divided this year, following a 14-point increase in negative ratings (now 29%) and a six-point drop in positive views (down to 27%). But negative views of Japan have grown particularly stark among its two close East Asian neighbours. In China, over the last year, negative ratings have gone up 16 points to an astonishing 90 per cent, and positive ratings have dropped from 17 to 5 per cent only. In South Korea, negative views have risen 12 points to almost four in five (79%). In South Korea and China, the negative sentiment is at its highest since 2006.

Regarding the Japanese themselves, they have never rated their country so well: one in two (50%, up 5 points) think positively of their country’s influence in the world.

In Europe, attitudes towards the perceived influence of Japan are diverse. Britons have the most favourable views and those have grown warmer over the past year, from 59 to 65 per cent. The French follow with a stable majority of 58 per cent leaning positively. Perceptions in Spain have improved and have somehow recovered from the big drop that occurred last year. Following a ten-point increase in favourable views, the Spanish opinion has shifted from being divided in 2013 (36% positive vs 32% negative) to leaning positively this year with a plurality of 46 per cent of Spaniards giving positive ratings.

In Germany, the low point from 2013 has persisted this year: an identical plurality leans negative (46%) while the proportion of Germans with positive views has remained unchanged (28%, and the fourth lowest in the survey).

In the surveyed countries surrounding the borders of Europe, the Russian opinion of Japan has remained stable (49% positive vs 12% negative), while that of Turks has become more undecided. Negative ratings from Turkish respondents have plummeted to 18 per cent (down 23 points), but positive views have also decreased six points (40%). However, overall, this growing indecision leaves the Turks more firmly entrenched to positive feelings towards Japan compared to 2013.

Finally, in Africa, apart from Nigeria already discussed, Japan’s influence remains positive overall and stable in Ghana (59% positive). However, the mood among Kenyan respondents has cooled significantly following a 13-point drop in positive ratings (down to 45%) combined with a 15-point increase in negative views (26%)—pushing views of Japan down to a low point since Kenya started rating this country in 2006.

 


 

Pakistan

Pakistan

Views of Pakistan have remained stable and very negative overall in 2014. On average, amongst the 20 tracking countries surveyed in 2013 and 2014, only 16 per cent of respondents rate Pakistan positively in terms of its influence in the world—this is one point higher than the proportion in 2013. Negative perceptions have gone up one point as well to reach 58 per cent. Pakistan remains the least positively rated along Iran.

Out of the 23 countries polled, only two lean positive (Pakistan itself, and Indonesia) with the 21 remaining leaning negatively.

The most negative perceptions of Pakistan are found among Western countries. Stable majorities of eight in ten and above lean negative in the USA (85%), and in Germany (80%). Negative attitudes towards Pakistan in Canada, Australia, France, the UK and Spain are shown among over 70 per cent and mostly stable except in Canada where it has increased by seven points and reached a record high since the country was first rated in 2008. However, in Spain, the negative sentiment has receded with a 14-point drop in negative ratings.

The USA, Spain and Germany only have five per cent of positive views, the lowest score given to Pakistan by the surveyed countries after Israel.

In countries at the periphery of Europe, perceptions of Pakistan are also all negative, although to a lesser extent than in Western countries. In Russia, 53 per cent have unfavourable views of Pakistan’s influence (up 8 points and at its highest since its initial rating in 2008), while only 6 per cent have a positive perception (lowest proportion since 2008). Turkey is less negative with favourable perceptions amounting 25 per cent and negative views receding down to 41 per cent (down 7 points since 2013). Asked to rate Pakistan for the first time, two thirds (68%) of Israeli give it negative ratings, while positive views merely exist (2%).

With the exception of Indonesia that posts 40 per cent of positive views, perceptions of Pakistan in Asian countries, although leaning negative, are less unfavourable than among Western countries. Apart from Australia (77%) and South Korea, where a growing proportion leans negatively towards Pakistan (66%, up 9 points), no Asian country holds over 50 per cent of negative perceptions. They reach 49 per cent in India where positive attitudes have gone up six points to 17 per cent. In China, the sentiment has become more negative overall with unfavourable ratings somewhat increasing (41%, up 5 points), and positive ratings dropping seven points to 21 per cent. Even in Indonesia, the mood has become less friendly with negative ratings going up six points to 31 per cent (highest proportion since the initial rating in 2008). In Japan, a stable plurality (41%) feels negative.

The highest positive view of Pakistan comes from its own population, with 44 per cent of rating their country’s influence favourably. This is up six points since 2013 and it is the highest positive rating that the population has given its country since 2008.

Africa is the region where views of Pakistan are the least unfavourable overall, although they remain in negative territory. Outside of Pakistan and Indonesia, Nigeria is the country with the highest positive perception of the country, with favourable views reaching 40 per cent. This is 12 points higher than in 2013 and, following an eight-point decrease in negative ratings (46%), overall perceptions among Nigerians lean only narrowly negatively. Negative perceptions have also decreased six points in Ghana where a plurality of 41 per cent leans unfavourably (34% positive). However, negative views have significantly increased in Kenya (45%, up 13 points).

In Latin America, the worst ratings of Pakistan continue to be found among Brazilians (75%, up 13 points). Negative perceptions of Pakistan have reached their highest level since it was first rated in Chile and Peru, but the proportion are still much lower than among Brazilians with pluralities of 49 and 47 per cent, respectively. Positive ratings have also gone down six points in Chile, to 13 per cent. Mexico bucks this trend as the negative sentiment among Mexican has appeased with negative ratings dropping 14 points to 44 per cent.

 


 

India

India

Global perceptions of India have improved in 2014. On average, in the 20 tracking countries polled in 2013 and 2014, 38 per cent have rated India’s world influence positively. This represents a four-point increase since 2013. At the same time, 36 per cent of respondents globally hold negative views (down 1 point). In terms of positive views, despite this improvement, India continues to rank 12th out of 17 countries rated, including the EU.

Out of the 23 countries surveyed about India’s influence in 2014, ten lean positive, ten negative, and three are divided.

The most favourable views of India are found among African countries where positive attitudes have become warmer over the past year. Sixty-four per cent of Nigerians have favourable perceptions (up 7 points, and record high since it was first rated in 2006), as do 53 per cent in Kenya and Ghana. In these two countries, positive ratings have gone up 18 and seven percentage points respectively. In the three African countries, negative perceptions are amongst the lowest of all surveyed countries, not above 23 per cent—and they are down seven points in Ghana (22%).

In Europe, perceptions of India’s influence in the world are split. Like in 2013, Britons remain divided (45% positive vs 46% negative). While the French were divided in 2013 (42% positive vs 44% negative), they have become more negative this year (40% positive vs 49% negative). This picture remains much less grim than in Germany where negative perceptions have surged 18 points to 68 per cent, or in Spain where the opinion remains strongly negative (20% positive vs 50% negative) despite a six-point uptick in positive ratings and a similar drop in unfavourable views.

Apart from Israel, countries in peripheral Europe lean much more favourably, with plurality of 45 per cent of Russians rating India positively and only 9 per cent of the country’s respondents having negative perceptions—the lowest proportion of all the surveyed countries alongside Japan. In Turkey, the mood towards India has shifted very noticeably with a 15-point drop in negative ratings combined with a nine-point rise in positive views. As a result, the Turkish opinion has become somewhat positive in 2014 (35% positive vs 29%) as opposed to leaning strongly negatively in 2013 (26% positive vs 44% negative). Surveyed for the first time in 2014, Israel is mostly negative towards the perceived influence of India. With only 9 per cent of positive ratings, it has the lowest proportion of favourable views out of all countries surveyed. Thirty-four per cent of Israeli feel negative, leaving a majority of 57 per cent who are undecided.

Like in the UK, opinions are mostly divided in the other English-speaking countries. Australian perceptions of India have shifted from leaning strongly negatively in 2013 to being divided in 2014 following an increase in positive views of 16 points (up to 44%) and a ten-point decrease in negative opinions (down to 46%). With negative views of India in the USA at their highest since the survey started in 2006—and now reaching 41 per cent—the opinion of India among Americans has slightly shifted from somewhat positive in 2013 to being divided in 2014 (45% positive vs 41% negative). In Canada, opinions remain unchanged with a plurality leaning negatively (38% positive vs 46% negative).

Perceptions of India among BRIC counterparts are mostly positive in 2014, due to improved ratings in China and Brazil. Though much less favourable overall than in Russia, perceptions have improved in Brazil, with positive ratings increasing by 15 points to 41 per cent. With negative ratings staying stable at 36 per cent, this has resulted in a shift of the Brazilian opinion now leaning somewhat positively overall. In China, a plurality of 35 per cent are negative in their attitudes towards India, however this is 10 per cent less than in 2013.

Other Asian countries surveyed have mixed views of India’s influence. Indians’ ratings of their own country’s influence excluded, Indonesians are the most positive in Asia about India (47% positive vs 24% negative). In Japan, despite an eight-point decline in positive perceptions since 2013, Japanese still lean towards a favourable opinion overall (34% positive vs 9% negative). In contrast, Pakistan and South Korea have mostly negative perceptions of India’s influence. Negative ratings have remained mostly stable in the two countries, but with 58 per cent of Pakistanis leaning unfavourably (second highest percentage after Israel), Pakistanis have never been so negative towards their neighbour since they first rated them in 2010.

India’s own perception of its influence in the world has also dropped, with a decrease in positive views of nine points (56%) and an increase in negative views of eight points (22%).

In Latin America, perceptions in Mexico have remained stable and negative overall (26% positive vs 37% negative). A plurality remains positive in Chile (35%), but it has declined from 46 per cent in 2013. In Peru, the public has shifted from being perfectly divided in 2013 (25% positive vs 25% negative) to leaning somewhat negatively this year following a six-point increase in negative ratings (26% positive vs 31% negative).

 


 

Iran

Iran

Views of Iran’s influence in the world have remained stable in 2014 and are again the most negative out of the 17 rated countries (EU included). On average, in the 21 tracking countries polled in 2013 and 2014, 60 per cent lean negatively towards Iran. Iran also ranks last in terms of the proportion of positive ratings received (16%), equally with Pakistan.

Out of the 23 countries rating Iran in 2014, all lean negative except the Muslim countries Pakistan and Indonesia, and Ghana who is divided.

Europe and North America have the most negative perceptions of Iran’s influence. Almost all of the surveyed countries in these continents have stable and over 80 per cent of respondents holding negative views of Iran. Americans are the most unfavourable with 88 per cent, followed by Germany (85%), France (84%), the UK and Canada (both 83%). Spain falls just beneath the 80 per cent threshold with 78 per cent of negative views.

Australia and South Korea show a very similar pattern with respectively 78 per cent (down 5 points) and 74 per cent rating Iran negatively. In Japan, a strong proportion has not provided a definite rating but a majority leans negatively (53%) compared to just 5 per cent who rate the country positively.

Outside of Europe, Eurasian countries Russia and Turkey also lean negative, though to a much lesser extent than in continental Europe. In Russia, 49 per cent of respondents are unfavourable in their attitudes towards Iran. This is up nine points than in 2013 and the highest proportion recorded in Russia since it first rated Iran in 2006. Conversely, negative opinions have decreased in neighbouring Turkey, shifting from 57 to 46 per cent in 2014, and positive opinions of Iran’s influence have gone up to 24 per cent (up 7 points). Recurrent tensions between Israel and Iran are clearly reflected in the ratings: 84 per cent of Israelis lean negatively as opposed to a meagre 2 per cent who give positive ratings—the lowest proportion in the survey.

In Asia, perceptions of Iran’s influence greatly vary. Neighbouring Pakistan, with 51 per cent of positive views—a similar proportion to last year’s—is the country with the most favourable view of Iran. It is followed by Indonesia where positive ratings have gone up six points to reach 40 per cent, resulting in a shift in the opinion from being divided in 2013 (34% positive vs 36% negative) to leaning somewhat positively this year (40% positive vs 35% negative). Negative opinions of Iran in Pakistan and Indonesia are also the lowest of the surveyed countries, with respectively 21 and 35 per cent.

Thirty-seven per cent of Indians rate Iran negatively, which is up by seven points and at their highest proportion since the first survey in 2006. Positive perceptions have, however, somewhat improved to 22 per cent (up 5 points). The picture in China is very similar with a negative plurality of 40 per cent opposing 18 per cent with positive ratings—this is China’s lowest positive perception of Iran since 2006.

In Latin America, negative views are the highest in Brazil (78%, up 12 points). Perceptions have become more unfavourable among Chileans as well with negative ratings up by ten points (59%) and positive attitudes down by 13 points (10%). The public in Mexico remains unfavourable towards Iran but less so than in 2013 (49%, down 10 points), while a stable plurality of Peruvians is oriented in the same negative direction (46%).

Views of Iran’s influence have only slightly shifted in Africa between 2013 and 2014, with the exception of Kenya, where negative perceptions have significantly increased from 44 to 62 per cent. Perceptions are unchanged and negative in Nigeria (54%). In Ghana, the opinion has remained split as in 2013 (37% positive vs 41% negative).

 


 

South Africa

South Africa

Global perceptions of South Africa have strongly improved in 2014. In the 21 tracking countries surveyed both in 2013 and 2014, positive ratings have jumped five points, to 39 per cent. This is the highest increase in the rated countries. At the same time, negative ratings have dropped one point to 31 per cent. South Africa has gone up one rank, seating tenth out of 17 countries (including the EU) in terms of positive ratings received.

Out of the 23 countries polled this year, 11 have a positive perception of South Africa, six lean negative, and six are divided.

Of all surveyed countries, positive perceptions of South Africa remain the highest in African countries. Over seven in ten Kenyans (71%) have favourable perceptions about South Africa’s influence in the world (up from 59%). Ghana follows closely with 70 per cent of positive ratings (down 5 points). In Nigeria, positive perceptions have remained stable (65%, and third highest proportion in the survey).

Outside of Africa, attitudes towards South Africa’s influence in the world vary greatly. In Europe, perceptions have grown more positively in France (55%, up 8 points), and in the UK opinions have shifted from leaning somewhat negatively in 2013 (36% positive vs 42% negative) to leaning positively in 2014, following a 13-point rise in favourable ratings (49% positive vs 40% negative). Both in France and the UK, positive attitudes towards South Africa have never been so strong since South Africa was first rated in 2009. The picture is radically different in Germany where negative ratings have hit a record high (59%, up 17 points). Spain is now divided (34% positive vs 34% negative) unlike in 2013 when respondents were somewhat negative (32% positive vs 38% negative).

In peripheral Europe, perceptions of South Africa in Turkey have warmed significantly over the past year. Not only have positive views risen from 22 to 30 per cent in 2014, but negative perceptions have also sharply decreased, dropping 14 points from 46 to 32 per cent. As a result, the Turkish opinion is now divided. Newly surveyed this year, Israel has very favourable attitudes towards South Africa, posting 53 per cent of positive ratings and only 7 per cent of negative ratings—the lowest proportion in the survey.

Perceptions of South Africa’s influence have followed different directions among BRIC countries. Positive opinions have significantly improved in Brazil and India since 2013, respectively increasing from 34 to 47 per cent and from 22 to 35 per cent. This has resulted in a shift for both the Brazilian and Indian opinions from being divided in 2013 to leaning positively in 2014. In Brazil and India, positive ratings towards South Africa are at their highest since the country was included in the poll in 2009.

The picture is radically different in China and Russia. In China, positive perceptions have significantly decreased, dropping 12 points to 22 per cent. This is the lowest proportion of favourable ratings given to South Africa by China since the country was first rated. The Chinese opinion has shifted from leaning somewhat positively in 2013 (34% positive vs 29% negative) to leaning negatively in 2014 (22% positive vs 34% negative). Results have barely shifted in Russia with an overall impression of South Africa that remains somewhat negative (19% positive vs 24% negative) and a large majority who is undecided.

A clear improvement of perceptions is observed among English spoken countries. Positive ratings have gone up by 16 points in Australia (41%), 13 points in the UK (49%), 12 points in the USA (48%), and ten points in Canada (43%). Apart from Australia, people’s opinions have shifted from leaning negatively or somewhat negatively in 2013 to leaning positively in 2014 (48% positive vs 36% negative in the USA; 49% positive vs 40% negative in the UK) or being divided (43% positive vs 39% negative in Canada). In Australia, the overall sentiment remains somewhat negative (41% positive vs 46% negative) but has largely appeased over the past year (25% positive vs 57% negative).

In the rest of Asia, perceptions of South Africa’s influence in the world have barely changed. Opinions remain divided for the second consecutive year in Indonesia (33% positive vs 36% negative) and for the fourth consecutive year in Pakistan (29% positive vs 27% negative)—but the Pakistanis are becoming more polarised year after year, with a decreasing proportion of respondents unable to rate South Africa’s influence one way or the other. Views of South Africa in South Korea have slightly shifted, from being somewhat positive in 2013 (37% positive vs 32% negative) to being divided in 2014, following an eight-point increase in negative perceptions (38% positive vs 40% negative). In Japan, a small plurality leans positively (20%) but the vast majority of respondents continue to be undecided (66%).

Opinions of South Africa in Latin America vary. Views have barely changed in Mexico between 2013 and 2014, and have remained negative overall (24% positive vs 36% negative). Perceptions are also negative in Peru and have slightly worsened following a seven-point increase in negative perceptions to reach its highest proportion to date (33%). In Chile, views have strongly deteriorated following a 12-point decreased in positive views and a seven-point increase in negative ratings. Overall, however, the Chilean public remains somewhat in positive territory (31% positive vs 26% negative).

 


 

Israel

Israel

 

Views of Israel have sharply improved in 2014. On average in the 21 tracking countries polled in 2013 and 2014, almost a quarter of respondents (24%) rate Israel positively in terms of its influence in the world and one in two (50%) rate it negatively. This represents an uptick of three points in its positive ratings since 2013 combined to a two-point drop in the proportion of unfavourable views. Despite this positive evolution, Israel continues to be the fourth most negatively viewed nation although is differentiated more visibly from the other worst-rated nations, North Korea, Iran and Pakistan.

Out of the 23 countries surveyed, 18 lean negatively towards Israel and only five lean positive.

The most unfavourable views towards Israel are found among European countries. Perceptions have barely changed since 2013 in the UK, Germany, and France with respectively 72, 67, and 64 per cent of negative opinions. In Spain, the overall sentiment remains strongly negative (14% positive vs 61% negative) but has receded following a nine-point decrease in the proportion of negative ratings combined to a ten-point rise in the percentage of those holding favourable views—this is its highest since Israel was first rated by Spain in 2008.

Unlike the EU countries surveyed, opinions of Israel’s influence in the world have significantly warmed in peripheral Europe. Russian views have shifted from leaning negatively in 2013 to leaning somewhat positively in 2014, due to a five-point increase in positive views (28%) and a nine-point decrease in negative views—down to 23 per cent and the lowest proportion in the survey after Israel. In Turkey, a strong plurality remains negative overall but the proportion of Turkish respondents holding unfavourable views of Israel has literally plummeted and is now almost half of what it was last year, dropping 37 points to reach its lowest level to date (44%). Positive opinions have gone up only by nine points (17%) over the same period of time, meaning an increased proportion among Turks is undecided about Israel’s influence in the world.

In other Muslim countries surveyed, views have worsened in Indonesia where three quarters of respondents (75%, up 5 points) rate Israel negatively and 7 per cent hold positive views (down 5 points)—this is the most dire picture of Israel among Indonesians since they first rated the country in 2007. In Pakistan, six in ten have unfavourable attitudes towards Israel (60%, down 5 points). In Nigeria, views have deteriorated and shifted from being divided in 2013 (35% positive vs 38% negative) to leaning negatively in 2014 following an eight-point increase in negative ratings (33% positive vs 48% negative).

In North America, similarly to the EU countries surveyed, perceptions of Israel’s influence have barely changed between 2013 and 2014. Views remain mainly negative in Canada (30% positive vs 55% negative) and mainly positive in the USA (52% positive vs 36% negative). Favourable ratings of Israel are at their highest in the USA and Canada since they first rated the country in 2007. USA also ranks second for most positive views of Israel’s influence after Ghana.

Perceptions have also barely changed in Latin American countries where opinions remain mainly negative. Brazil has the highest negative perceptions of Israel (58% and stable) but positive attitudes have increased six points to reach 21 per cent. In Peru, a stable plurality leans negatively towards Israel (41%), which is twice as much the proportion of those holding favourable views (19%). Perceptions have remained strongly negative in Mexico (13% positive vs 45% negative) although less so than in 2013 following an eight-point drop in unfavourable views. In Argentina, 35 per cent give Israel negative ratings but a majority is undecided in its views (53%).

In Asia, Australia is among the most unfavourable towards Israel, with two thirds of the population (67% and stable) giving negative ratings and just under a quarter having positive views (24%). Favourable attitudes, however, have gone up eight points since 2013 and are at their highest since Australia first rated Israel in 2007. Views have softened in South Korea as well with negative ratings down by six points (50% and at their lowest since its initial rating in 2007), and this decrease has been transferred to positive ratings (24%, up 6 points).

Perceptions have become much more unfavourable in China, with negative ratings reaching 49 per cent in 2014 (up 16 points) and positive opinions plummeting by 19 points to hit a bottom low of 13 per cent. While they were divided in 2013, the Chinese opinion is now leaning strongly negatively towards Israel. In India, the opinion remains negative (22% positive vs 34% negative) but the public has become more polarised as the proportions of both those holding negative and positive views have increased (by 8 and 6 points, respectively). Japan has the lowest positive views of all surveyed countries, with 4 per cent and a stable 50 per cent leans negatively.

In Africa, the surveyed countries are amongst the most positive of Israel’s influence in the world. Ghanaians are the most favourable towards Israel in the survey (54%, up 10 points and at its highest level), just ahead of the USA (52%). In Kenya, an increased plurality is positive (47%, and third highest proportion in the survey) but negative perceptions have almost doubled over the past year (27%, up 12 points).

Surveyed for the first time this year, Israeli respondents perceive their own country’s influence quite positively overall (40% positive vs 18%).

 


 

North Korea

North Korea

Global views of North Korea have remained fairly stable and are very negative in 2014. On average, in the 21 tracking countries surveyed, 58 per cent have a negative opinion of North Korea (up 1 point) and 19 per cent hold the opposite attitude (also up 1 point).

Out of the 17 rated countries, North Korea continues to be third-last in terms of positive views. Of the 23 countries surveyed in 2014, 17 countries are negative, four are divided (India, Kenya, Nigeria, and Pakistan) and two are positive (Turkey and Ghana).

The most unfavourable perceptions of North Korea are found among its closest neighbours, South Korea and Japan, where over nine in ten respondents give negative ratings to the Pyongyang Regime regarding its influence in the world (91% in both countries). With 1 per cent positive views, Japan gives the lowest positive rating amongst the surveyed countries.

Perceptions of North Korea’s influence in the world have barely changed in the Western world between 2013 and 2014, being very firmly entrenched in negative territories. Opinions are strongly negative in the USA, now reaching 90 per cent (the second-highest proportion in the survey): the highest since North Korea started to be rated in 2007. Negative perceptions also reached their highest level since 2007 in Australia (86%, third highest proportion in the survey), and Canada (83%). In continental Europe, 85 per cent of Germans rate North Korea negatively (down 5 points from 2013), as do 79 per cent in France and 73 per cent in Spain (also down 5 points).

Opinions differ in peripheral Europe. In Russia, perceptions remain negative overall but to a much lesser extent, as only 37 per cent of respondents hold unfavourable views of North Korea. In Turkey, negative perceptions have decreased considerably, dropping 32 points to 19 per cent: opinion has shifted from leaning negatively to leaning positively in 2014 (32% positive vs 19% negative).

There is a sharp contrast in perceptions of North Korea’s influence amongst Asian countries. Apart from South Korea and Japan, China and Indonesia also hold negative views, though to a lesser extent, with 46 and 44 per cent unfavourable ratings respectively. Opinions of both countries have shifted to become negative in 2014. Views in China were divided in 2013, but positive views have dropped 12 points (to 20%) while negative views have increased 14 points to 46 per cent, pushing the overall sentiment to levels unseen since polling started in 2007. Similarly, Indonesia has seen a sharp decrease in positive perceptions (28%, down 14 points) combined with an increased proportion of negative ratings (44%, up 15 points to the highest proportion since 2007). Indonesians now lean negatively after being positive in 2013. India is bucking this trend in Asia, as positive ratings have gone up eight points (23%), making the opinion shift from leaning negatively in 2013 (15% positive vs 23% negative) to being divided in 2014 (23% positive vs 27% negative). In Pakistan, the public has remained divided (28% positive vs 32% negative).

Perceptions of North Korea’s influence are negative in all Latin American countries surveyed. Negative views have increased in Peru (49%, up 14 points) and Brazil (54%, up 7 points). A plurality of 47 per cent of Mexicans also have negative views, but this proportion has decreased by seven points over the past year.

The most positive perceptions of North Korea are all found in Africa where they have significantly increased. With 57 per cent of positive views in 2014 (up 9 points), Ghana has its most positive rating of North Korea since 2007, and the highest positive rating of all surveyed countries. Negative views among Ghanaians have also dropped seven points, to 20 per cent. Ghana is followed by Nigeria, where 42 per cent of the opinion holds positive views (the second-highest proportion in the survey). This is up six points since 2013; however, the opinion remains divided overall (42% positive vs 38% negative). Views in Kenya have improved with a 14-point rise in positive ratings (34%, and third highest percentage in the survey), making the country’s opinion shift from leaning negatively in 2013 to being divided in 2014, despite a six-point increase in negative ratings (34% positive vs 34% negative).

 


 

France

France

Global perceptions of France have slightly improved in 2014. On average, in the 20 tracking countries surveyed both in 2013 and 2014, 50 per cent feel positive about France’s influence in the world. This is two points higher than in 2013, and this increase has pushed France to the fourth rank in terms of the proportion of positive ratings received, at the expense of Japan. Negative perceptions have decreased by one point in the same time, amounting to 22 per cent in 2014. Out of the 23 countries surveyed, 22 are positive and one only rates France’s influence negatively (Pakistan).

In the EU, perceptions of France have remained mostly stable in Germany (47% positive) and Spain although the majority of favourable opinions seen in Spain in 2013 has vanished, leaving a plurality of 46 per cent with positive perceptions (down 5 points). In the UK, positive opinions have significantly improved, rising from 50 per cent in 2013 to 61 per cent in 2014: its highest rating of France since 2005. The extent to which the French rate their own country’s influence positively has decreased over the past year by six points. With seven in ten (70%) rating it positively, this is the second-highest proportion in the survey.

Attitudes towards France’s influence, outside of the EU, are also positive. In Russia, 51 per cent lean favourably, a stable proportion from 2013. In Turkey, the opinion has shifted remarkably, as negative views have dropped 35 points to 29 per cent while positive views have improved to reach 35 per cent (up 14 points). This is the first time that the Turkish opinion is favourable overall since the beginning of the survey in 2005. Newly surveyed this year, Israel leans positive thanks to a tiny plurality of 24 per cent. However, almost six in ten (58%) do not have a clear view.

In North America, views are stable and strongly positive among Canadians (64%), and they have gotten warmer among Americans (58% positive, up 7 points, vs 26% negative, down 7 points).

Although perceptions of France’s influence in the world are positive in Latin America, favourable views are not as high as in North America, with the exception of Brazil. Positive views there have increased significantly in 2014, reaching 62 per cent, compared with 50 per cent in 2013. Attitudes are all positive in Peru, Argentina, and Mexico, but to a lesser extent (respectively 48%, 35% and 34%). In Mexico, negative views have sharply decreased, dropping 18 points from 43 to 25 per cent, making the opinion shift from leaning negatively in 2013 to leaning positively this year.

The surveyed African countries also all have a positive view of France’s influence. Ghana has the most positive opinion of all surveyed countries, with a fairly stable proportion of positive ratings (72%, the highest positive rating of France since 2006). Positive opinions have barely shifted in Kenya (48%) but the proportion of negative perceptions has doubled from 10 per cent in 2013 to 22 per cent this year. In Nigeria, a comfortable majority holds positive feelings towards France (55%) although this has decreased from 61 per cent in 2013.

Opinions of France are more differentiated in Asia. With 70 per cent of positive views (up 6 points since 2013), South Korea has the second-highest positive impression of France in 2014, tied with France itself. Australia is the second-most positive country in the region, posting 57 per cent of favourable ratings (a stable result). In Japan, a very strong and somewhat increasing plurality leans positively (38% positive vs 4% negative). Positive perceptions have also improved among Indians (35%, up 6 points). In Indonesia, a strong plurality still holds positive views of France, but the mood has cooled with positive ratings dropping ten points (to 46%) and negative ratings rising by the same amount (to 24%). Views have also cooled in China, where negative views of France have increased eight points to 27 per cent. However, negative attitudes continue to be greatly outnumbered by the proportion of those leaning positively (47%).

Pakistan is the only surveyed country where a plurality of the opinion leans negatively towards France. Thirty-eight per cent of Pakistanis give negative ratings to France. This represents a seven-point increase, and is the highest proportion since respondents began rating France in 2010. Divided in 2013, the opinion in Pakistan is now back into negative territory (30% positive vs 38% negative).

 


 

China

China

Views of China have stabilised in 2014 after the sudden deterioration that occurred in 2013. In the 20 tracking countries polled in both years, an average of 42 per cent hold favourable attitudes towards China’s perceived influence in the world. This represents a two-point increase since last year and is the same proportion as those holding negative views (42%, unchanged), making global opinion divided in perceptions of China.

China ranks eighth out of the 17 rated countries in terms of positive views in 2014, tying the USA. Of the 23 surveyed countries, ten rank China’s influence positively, nine are negative, and four are divided.

The most favourable views of China are found in Africa where no surveyed country has less than 65 per cent of positive views. Positive views have increased in two of the three surveyed African nations, reaching 85 per cent in Nigeria (up 7 points, tying China itself in giving the highest percentage in the survey), and 65 per cent in Kenya (also up 7 points). Views have remained stable in Ghana, where two thirds of the opinion lean favourable (67%).

Perceptions of China in surveyed Latin American countries are also mostly positive, with very little change in opinions since 2013. Peru and Brazil are the most favourable and continue to have above 50 per cent of positive views and less than 30 per cent of negative views in 2014. Surveyed for the first time in 2014, Argentina has 45 per cent of positive views compared with 20 per cent of negative ones. Here, only Mexico has a negative perception of China (33% positive vs 40% negative), despite a seven-point decrease in negative ratings from 2013.

As in Brazil, attitudes towards China are also positive and relatively stable in another BRIC nation. The proportion of Russians leaning favourably has increased somewhat, to 47 per cent (up 5 points), while negative views have remained stable (24%). In India, however, the mood towards China has worsened following an eight-point increase in the proportion of negative ratings (35%). Leaning narrowly positive in 2013 (36% positive vs 27% negative), Indian opinion has shifted and is now divided (33% positive vs 35% negative).

In the rest of Asia, opinions of China are widely diverse. In Australia, a significant increase in positive views (up 11 points) combined with a matching decrease in negative ratings has resulted in a shift in opinion, from leaning mainly negative in 2013 (36% positive vs 55% negative) to being divided in 2014 (47% positive vs 44% negative). Similarly, views have warmed a bit in South Korea following a nine-point increase in positive ratings, but they remain negative overall (32% positive vs 56% negative). In Japan, negative perceptions have increased nine points, reaching 73 per cent and hitting a record high since 2005. Having only three per cent positive views, Japan also has the lowest positive opinion of China of all surveyed countries.

China’s rating of itself excluded, Pakistan has the most positive views of China in Asia, at 75 per cent (although this is down 6 points since 2013). The opinion in Indonesia is also comfortably positive, with a stable majority of 52 per cent holding positive views. China’s opinion of its own influence on the world has sharply improved in 2014, as positive ratings have risen eight points to 85 per cent and negative ratings have fallen nine points to seven per cent.

In North America, perceptions of China are similar among Canadians and Americans. Sixty-four per cent of Canadians give negative ratings to China’s perceived influence (up 5 points), and 66 per cent of American respondents lean the same way (stable).

In the EU countries, Germans have become increasingly negative towards China with 76 per cent perceiving it negatively. This is up nine points since 2013 and is Germany’s most unfavourable rating of China since 2005. In France, a stable proportion leans negatively (68%). Negative sentiments have reduced in Spain, dropping eight points to 59 per cent, while positive ratings have simultaneously increased by 11 points to 24 per cent. In the UK, opinion has improved significantly this year, shifting from leaning negatively in 2013 to being divided this year (49% positive vs 46% negative) thanks to a 12-point rise in positive ratings. With 49 per cent of positive ratings, Britons are the most favourable towards China among the Western countries surveyed, but are also the most polarised out of all countries surveyed.

In the Middle East, perceptions of China among Turks have improved following a 22-point drop in negative views, making the country’s opinion divided (32% positive vs 31% negative). Newly surveyed this year, Israel leans narrowly negative (27% positive vs 34% negative).

 


 

Brazil

Brazil

Global views of Brazil’s influence in the world remain mainly positive on 2014. In the 20 tracking countries polled in 2013 and 2014, an average of 45 per cent give it positive ratings (up 1 point) as opposed to the 26 per cent who give negative ratings. While the proportion of unfavourable ratings has increased by three points over the past year, Brazil remains comfortably seated in the table of all rated countries, ranking seventh in terms of positive views received, and having the fifth-lowest proportion of negative ratings.

Of all 23 countries surveyed in 2014, 17 have a mainly positive perception of Brazil’s influence in the world, four are divided, and two are negative (Germany and Pakistan).

Perceptions of Brazil amongst BRIC countries have remained fairly stable since 2013. Views are mostly positive and very stable in Russia, with a plurality of 38 per cent giving positive ratings to Brazil for the third consecutive year. With only 7 per cent negative views, Russia has the lowest proportion of unfavourable ratings of Brazil amongst the surveyed countries (along with Japan). Views are more moderate in China, but have a shifted a little from being divided in 2013 (34% positive vs 31% negative) to leaning somewhat positive in 2014 (34% positive vs 28% negative). In India, the opinion has become more polarised with both positive and negative ratings increasing, but overall attitudes remain divided (29% positive vs 26% negative).

The other two countries surveyed in South America have some of the most positive views of Brazil. In Chile, the proportion of positive ratings has decreased by 11 points since 2013, but with 62 per cent respondents leaning favourably, Chile has the third-warmest perception of Brazil after Brazil itself and Ghana. Peru follows closely, with a stable majority of 61 per cent.

Further north, Mexico also leans positive, with perceptions mostly unchanged since 2013 (45% positive vs 21% negative). For Canadians and Americans, positive perceptions of Brazil have increased: Canadians’ positive ratings rose from 44 to 56 per cent in the last year, and Americans’ have gone from 50 to 55 per cent.

Views among the surveyed EU countries are quite diverse, with the proportion of positive ratings ranging from 55 per cent in France to only 21 per cent in Germany. This comfortable majority among French has remained stable over the past year. Positive perceptions have also remained stable in the UK over the last four years, with 47 per cent in 2014, but negative views have reached their highest level since 2008: there has been a significant increase from 27 per cent in 2013 to 39 per cent in 2014. In Germany, the public already had a negative opinion of Brazil in 2013, but this has worsened even more. Following a 19-point increase in negative ratings to 59 per cent, this is the highest negative response recorded here since 2008. While Spain had strong positive attitudes towards Brazil in 2013 (58% positive vs 13% negative), these have plummeted following a 23-point drop in positive ratings and a 22-point increase in negative ratings. As a result, Spanish opinion is now divided in its attitudes towards Brazil for the first time since the country began to give ratings in 2008.

In the Middle East, the Turkish public remains divided (32% positive vs 31% negative). This is also the case in Israel (14% positive vs 17% negative), though perceptions are very much undecided as 69 per cent do not have a clear opinion of how they perceive Brazil’s world influence.

Perceptions of Brazil in all surveyed African countries remain mainly positive in 2014. Ghana has the most favourable attitudes towards Brazil in the survey (after Brazil itself), with two thirds leaning positively (65%). This is the highest proportion of positive ratings recorded in Ghana since Brazil started to be rated in 2008. Views are also very healthy in Nigeria (59% positive) despite an increase in negative perceptions (25%, up 8 points). The mood among Kenyans has remained stable and favourable overall (46% positive vs 18% negative).

Among the remaining Asian countries surveyed, attitudes towards Brazil’s perceived influence in the world are also largely positive—with the exception of Pakistan, where opinion has shifted from being divided in 2013 (27% positive vs 26% negative) to leaning somewhat negative in 2014 (26% positive vs 31% negative). In Australia, views have markedly improved, shifting from being divided in 2013 (39% positive vs 37% negative) to leaning positive this year due to a ten-point increase in positive ratings (49% positive vs 34% negative). Views in Indonesia and South Korea have barely changed since 2013, with stable proportions of positive opinions of 56 and 47 per cent respectively. The proportion of favourable views has decreased slightly in Japan (35%, down 5 points) but only seven per cent of Japanese respondents give negative ratings, the lowest unfavourable proportion (along with Russia) for Brazil in the survey.

 


 

South Korea

South Korea

 

Global perceptions of South Korea’s influence in the world have remained stable and narrowly positive in 2014. On average, in the 20 tracking countries polled in 2013 and 2014, 38 per cent are positive about South Korea and 34 per cent are negative. This represents a two-point increase in both positive and negative views over the past year.

Out of the 23 countries polled, 13 lean positive, seven lean negative, and three are divided (France, Peru, and the UK).

Views in North America of South Korea’s influence have strongly improved in 2014. Positive perceptions in both the USA and Canada have significantly increased, by eight and ten points respectively. With 55 per cent of respondents leaning positively, Americans have never been so favourable toward South Korea since tracking began in 2010. In Canada, the increase has resulted in a shift in opinion from being divided in 2013 (38% positive vs 41% negative) to mainly positive this year (48% positive vs 39% negative).

Perceptions of South Korea’s influence in the world are varied in the surveyed Asian countries but remain mostly positive, with the exception of Japan. Attitudes have warmed a great deal in Australia with a 17-point increase in positive ratings and a nine-point drop in negative views. With 62 per cent of respondents leaning positive, Australians are the third-most positive about South Korea (after South Korea itself and Ghana), and are like Americans in giving South Korea the best positive ratings since 2010. Perceptions have also improved in India, where 30 per cent of the public gives positive ratings to South Korea, an 11-point rise from 2013. This is has led to a shift from a divided opinion in 2013 (19% positive vs 19% negative) to a positive one in 2014 (30% positive vs 23% negative), and is also India’s highest rating of South Korea’s influence.

Over the past year, attitudes have remained relatively stable and mainly positive in China and Pakistan, with 40 per cent positive views given in the former and 31 per cent in the latter. Among Asian countries surveyed, only Indonesian and Japanese opinions of South Korea have significantly worsened, although a plurality in Indonesia remain positive (48%, down 10 points). Japanese opinions have decreased, with positive ratings dropping six points to 13 per cent and negative ratings climbing nine points to 37 per cent. Negative ratings of South Korea in Japan have never been so high since they began to rate the country.

In continental Europe, attitudes towards South Korea tend to be quite unfavourable. The highest proportion of positive ratings is found in the UK, but the opinion remains divided (45% positive vs 45% negative). In France, positive ratings have increased by five points, and this has led to a shift in opinion from negative in 2013 to divided this year (42% positive vs 46% negative). In Germany, a strong majority of respondents continues to be negative (59%) but the proportion has dropped six points from its high point in 2013. In Spain, perceptions have deteriorated abruptly, shifting from being mainly positive in 2013 to being negative in 2014. Negative ratings have surged to 50 per cent (up 29 points) and reached a record high since 2010, while positive views plunged from 43 to 21 per cent in the same time.

To the east, views of South Korea among Russians have remained stable, with a plurality of respondents (35%) rating the country’s influence positively, while the mood in Turkey has improved and shifted from being negative in 2013 (30% positive vs 40% negative) to being positive this year, with an 18-point drop in negative ratings and an eight-point increase in positive views (38% positive vs 22% negative). Newly surveyed this year, a tiny plurality of Israeli respondents leans negatively (25%), but the vast majority of the public is undecided (64%).

Perceptions of South Korea in the Latin American countries surveyed have deteriorated in 2014. In Peru, a ten-point increase in negative ratings has shifted opinion to being divided (32% positive vs 35% negative) after leaning somewhat positive in 2013 (31% positive vs 25% negative). Similarly, in Chile, the opinion has shifted from leaning positive in 2013 (40% positive vs 26% negative) to leaning negative in 2014 (21% positive vs 40% negative). This is the worst net result observed in Chile since ratings of South Korea began in 2010. Perceptions have barely changed in Mexico and Brazil, with 41 per cent giving negative ratings to the influence of South Korea.

All surveyed African countries have positive impressions of South Korea. Ghana has the highest positive perception of South Korea amongst the countries surveyed—with the exception of South Korea’s own—with 63 per cent positive views (up 8 points). Views of South Korea in Nigeria and Kenya have remained fairly stable over the past year, with respective pluralities of 46 and 36 per cent leaning positively. In Kenya, however, the proportion of negative ratings has gone up seven points to 28 per cent.

South Korea’s perception of its own influence in the world has barely changed in the last year, with 68 per cent giving positive ratings—the highest proportion in the survey.

Methodology

In total 24,542 citizens in Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, France, Germany, Ghana, India, Indonesia, Israel, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru, Russia, South Korea, Spain, Turkey, the UK, and the United States were interviewed face-to-face or by telephone between December 17, 2013 and April 28, 2014. Questions were asked by half samples in all countries polled except in Argentina and Japan. Polling was conducted for BBC World Service by GlobeScan and its research partners in each country.

In Brazil, China, Indonesia, Kenya, and Turkey, urban samples were used. The margin of error per country ranges from +/- 2.5 to 6.1 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

 

Country
Sample Size (unweighted)
Field dates
Sample frame
Survey methodology
Type of sample
Argentina 1006 February 21 – 28, 2014 18+ Face-to-face National
Australia 806 January 13 – February 18, 2014 18+ Telephone National
Brazil 801 January 13 – February 7, 2014 18-69 Face-to-face Urban1
Canada 1004 January 10 – February 18, 2014 18+ Telephone National
Chile 1200 December 19, 2013 – January 6, 2014 18+ Face-to-face National
China 1000 January 14 – February 23, 2014 18+ Telephone Urban2
France 1004 January 20 – February 3, 2014 18+ Telephone National
Germany 1004 January 21 – February 17, 2014 16-70 Telephone National
Ghana 508 February 20 – April 28, 2014 18-65 Face-to-face National
India 1064 February 10 – 22, 2014 18+ Face-to-face National
Indonesia 1000 February 4 – 27, 2014 18+ Face-to-face Urban3
Israel 1000 January 23 – 30, 2014 18+ Telephone National
Japan 1522 January 18 – 19, 2014 20+ Face-to-face National
Kenya 1010 February 4 – 16, 2014 18+ Face-to-face Urban4
Mexico 800 February 22 – 27, 2014 18+ Face-to-face National
Nigeria 800 February 12 – 20, 2014 18+ Face-to-face National
Pakistan 2168 January 27 – February 15, 2014 18+ Face-to-face National
Peru 1008 February 5 – 12, 2014 18-70 Face-to-face National
Russia 1021 January 24 – February 19, 2014 18+ Face-to-face National
South Korea 1000 February 8 – 11, 2014 19+ Telephone National
Spain 800 December 17, 2013 – January 7, 2014 18+ Telephone National
Turkey 1012 January 3-25, 2014 15+ Face-to-face Urban5
United Kingdom 1000 January 14, 2014 – February 22, 2014 18+ Telephone National
USA 1004 January 10 – 17, 2014 18+ Telephone National
  1. In Brazil the survey was conducted in Belo Horizonte, Brasília, Curitiba, Goiânia, Porto Alegre, Recife, Rio de Janeiro, Salvador, São Paulo, representing 23 per cent of the national adult population.
  2. In China the survey was conducted in Beijing, Beiliu, Chengdu, Dujiangyan, Fenyang, Fuyang, Guangzhou, Hangzhou, Manzhouli, Quanzhou, Qujing, Shanghai, Shenyang, Shuangcheng, Wuhan, Xi’an, Xining, and Zhengzhou, representing 45 per cent of the national adult population.
  3. In Indonesia the survey was conducted in Bandung, Jakarta, Makassar, Medan, and Surabaya, representing 27 per cent of the national adult population.
  4. In Kenya the survey was conducted in Kakamega, Kisumu, Machakos, Mombasa, Nairobi, Nakuru, and Nyeri, representing 45 per cent of the national adult population.
  5. In Turkey the survey was conducted in İstanbul, Tekirdağ, Bursa, İzmir, Adana, Samsun, Trabzon, Ankara, Kayseri, Malatya, Diyarbakır, and Erzurum, representing 55 per cent of the national adult population.

Research Partners

Country Research Institute Location Contact
Argentina TNS Argentina Buenos Aires Angeles Arano
angeles.arano@tns-gallup.com.ar
+54 11 4891 6469
Australia GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767
Brazil Market Analysis Florianopolis Fabián Echegaray
fabian@marketanalysis.com.br
+55 48 3364 0000
Canada GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767
Chile Mori Chile Santiago Marta Lagos
mlagos@morichile.cl
+56 2334 4544
China GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767
France Efficience 3 Paris and Rheims Thierry Laurain
thierry.l@efficience3.com
+33 1 4316 5442
Germany Ri*QUESTA GmbH Teningen Bernhard Rieder
riquesta.rieder@t-online.de
+49 7641 93 43 36
Ghana Business Interactive Consulting Limited Accra Razaaque Animashaun
info@bigghana.com
+233 302 783140 / +233 302 782892
India Team C Voter Noida Yashwant Deshmukh
yashwant@teamcvoter.com
+91 120 424 7135
Indonesia DEKA Marketing Research Jakarta Ratna Mulia Darmawan
ratna.darmawan@deka-research.co.id
+62 21 723 6901
Israel TRI Strategic Research Tel Aviv Arie Rotem
arie@t-r-i.co.il
+972 (0)36478955
Japan The Yomiuri Shimbun Tokyo Susumu Arai
arai8138@yomiuri.com
+81 3 3217 1963
Kenya Research Path Associates Ltd. Nairobi Charles Onsongo
charles.onsongo@rpa.co.ke
+254 20 2734770
Mexico Parametría Mexico City Francisco Abundis
fabundis@parametria.com.mx
+52 55 2614 0089
Nigeria Market Trends Lagos Jo Ebhomenye
joebhomenye@hotmail.com
+234 1734 7384
Pakistan Gallup Pakistan Islamabad Ijaz Shafi Gilani
isb@gallup.com.pk
+92 51 2655630
Peru Datum Lima Urpi Torrado
urpi@datum.com.pe
+511 215 0600
Russia CESSI Institute for Comparative Social Research Moscow Vladimir Andreenkov
vladimir.andreenkov@cessi.ru
+7 495 650 55 18
South Korea East Asia Institute Seoul Wonchil Chung
cwc@eai.or.kr
+82 2 2277 1683
Spain Sigma Dos Int. Madrid Petrana Valentinova
petrana@sigmados.com
+34 91 360 0474
Turkey Yöntem Research Consultancy Ltd. Istanbul Mehmet Aktulga
mehmet.aktulga@yontemresearch.com
+90 212 278 12 19
United Kingdom Populus Data Solutions London Patrick Diamond
pdiamond@populusdatasolutions.com
+44 207 553 4148
USA GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767

Question Wording

M1A. Please tell me if you think each of the following countries is having a mainly positive or mainly negative influence in the world. ROTATE

at) China
01 – Mainly positive
02 – Mainly negative
VOLUNTEERED (DO NOT READ)
03 – Depends
04 – Neither, neutral
99 – DK/NA
bt) France
ct) The United States
dt) The European Union
et) Japan
ft) Israel
gt) North Korea
ht) Canada

 

M1B. Please tell me if you think each of the following countries is having a mainly positive or mainly negative influence in the world. ROTATE

at) The United Kingdom
01 – Mainly positive
02 – Mainly negative
VOLUNTEERED (DO NOT READ)
03 – Depends
04 – Neither, neutral
99 – DK/NA
bt) Russia
ct) India
dt) Iran
et) Brazil
ft) Pakistan
gt) Germany
ht) South Africa
it) South Korea

One-in-Two Say Internet Unsafe Place for Expressing Views: Global Poll

Header---BBC-Press-Releases

31 March 2014 – Just over one in two citizens (52%) across 17 countries polled for the BBC World Service disagree that “the Internet is a safe place to express my opinions,” outnumbering the 40 per cent who agree it is safe.

The poll, conducted by GlobeScan among over 17,000 people worldwide between December 2013 and February 2014 is being released as part of Freedom Live—a day of broadcasts on the World Service’s 27 language services exploring stories about freedom from around the world.

While one-in-two judge the Internet an unsafe place for expressing opinions, two-thirds (67%) say the Internet brings them greater freedom, with only 25 per cent disagreeing.

One in three citizens (36%) across the 17 countries say they do not feel free from government surveillance and monitoring, making this the worst rated of five freedoms examined in the poll. Majorities of Americans (54%) and Germans (51%) do not feel free from government surveillance, while in contrast, strong majorities feel free of surveillance in countries such as China (where 76% say they feel free of surveillance), Indonesia (69%) and Russia (61%).

Media freedom was also given low ratings. Across eight countries surveyed in 2007 and 2014, the percentage of people who feel that the media in their country is “free to report the news accurately, truthfully and without undue bias” has dropped by nearly one third over the last seven years, from 59 per cent to 40 per cent. The biggest falls occurred in Kenya (down 37 points), India (down 23 points) and Russia (down 20 points). In the UK and the USA, only a minority of respondents now feel that the media in their countries is free, compared to majorities in 2007.

As for other freedoms, strong majorities across the full 17 countries surveyed consider they have a high level of freedom when it comes to “practicing the religion of their choice” (87%), to “marry or live with the person of their choosing” (86%), and to “speak about any issue publicly” (75%).

The results are drawn from a telephone and in-person survey of 17,589 adult citizens across 17 countries. It was conducted for the BBC World Service between December 2013 and February 2014 by the international polling firm GlobeScan and its national partners. Within-country results are considered accurate within +/- 2.9 to 4.9 per cent 19 times out of 20.

GlobeScan Chairman Doug Miller commented: “The poll suggests that two of the underpinnings of modern democracies are at risk—a media seen as free and fair; and an Internet safe for the free expression of views.

The results also suggest that many of the personal freedoms that Western democracies have championed in the world are actually fairly well established in the minds of citizens across these particular 17 countries. Ironically, it is in some of these very democracies where citizens give relatively poor ratings of some freedoms.”

Opinions on the Internet - BBC 2014

Individual Freedoms - BBC 2014 

Freedom of the Press - BBC 2014

Detailed Findings

On average across the 17 countries, the poll finds that those who feel “the Internet is a safe place to express my opinions” (40%) are outnumbered by those who disagree it is safe (52%). France is among the countries where respondents do not feel they can express their opinions safely online (76%), alongside South Korea (72%), Spain (66%), Canada, the USA, and Germany (65% each). Only six surveyed countries have majorities that feel they can express their opinions online safely: Nigeria (71%), India (67%), Indonesia (57%), Kenya (52%), Pakistan and Peru (both 51%).

At the same time, two-thirds of respondents (67%) say the Internet brings them greater freedom, with the most enthused respondents being in Africa (81% in Nigeria and 78% in Kenya), followed by Australians (77%), Britons (76%), Indonesians (73%), Canadians and Americans (both 72%). In contrast, people in China do not report a strong sense of increased freedom from using the Internet, with a narrow majority agreeing with the statement and 45 per cent disagreeing with it.

Across the 17 countries surveyed, an average of 60 per cent say they feel free from government surveillance in their country as opposed to the 36 per cent who report not being free. Unlike the USA and Germany, all other surveyed countries have majorities who consider themselves free from government monitoring programmes. In China, 76 per cent say they feel free from government monitoring—the highest proportion in the survey. Other countries with strong majorities feeling their privacy is respected include Australia (72%), Indonesia (69%), Canada (64%), Nigeria (63%), Peru (62%), Russia, Pakistan, and the UK (61% each).

On average, only 40 per cent believe that the press and media in their country are free to report the news accurately, truthfully and without undue bias. Just above a quarter (27%) have the opposite opinion, and the views of 28 per cent are mixed (neither free nor not free). Respondents from emerging economies tend to believe in the freedom of their national media, with Indonesians by far the most likely (73%), followed by Peruvians (51%) and strong pluralities of opinions in Africa (Nigeria, 49%; Kenya, 44%), India (49%) and China (47%)—although in China this perception is counter-balanced by an almost equal proportion of neutral opinions (44%). Conversely, South Korea stands out with seven in ten (69%) saying the media in South Korea is not free, followed by strong pluralities in Spain (46%) and France (40%).

Among eight tracking countries surveyed on media freedom in both 2007 and 2014, perceived freedom of the media has plummeted, dropping from 59 per cent in 2007 to 40 per cent in 2014. The biggest drops occurred in Kenya (down 37 points), India (down 23 points), and Russia (down 20 points). In the UK and USA, the percentage thinking their media is free has dropped over the seven years from majorities to minorities (56% to 45%, and 53% to 42%, respectively).

A total of 17,589 citizens across 17 countries were interviewed face-to-face or by telephone between December 2013 and end of February 2014. Countries polled included: Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru, Russia, South Korea, Spain, the UK, and the USA. Polling was conducted for BBC World Service by the international polling firm GlobeScan and its research partners in each country. In three of the countries (China, Indonesia, Kenya), the sample was limited to major urban areas. The margin of error per country ranges from +/- 2.9 to 4.9 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

 

For full methodology, question wording, and detailed results, including region-by-region data for all key questions, please see the drop-down links at the bottom of this article.

 

For more details, please visit www.GlobeScan.com as well as the GlobeScan Espresso Blog http://www.globescan.com/news-and-analysis/blog.html

– 30 –

 


Participating Countries

Participating Countries

In China, Indonesia, and Kenya urban samples were used.


Media Contacts

For media interviews with the participating pollsters, please contact:


About GlobeScan

GlobeScan is an international opinion research consultancy. We provide global organisations with evidence-based insight to help them set strategy and shape their communications. Companies, multilateral institutions, governments, and NGOs trust GlobeScan for our unique expertise across reputation management, sustainability, and stakeholder relations.

GlobeScan conducts research in over 90 countries and is a signatory to the UN Global Compact. Established in 1987, GlobeScan is an independent, management-owned company with offices in Toronto, London, and San Francisco. For more information, please visit: www.GlobeScan.com

About BBC World Service

BBC World Service is an international multimedia broadcaster, delivering a wide range of language and regional services on radio, TV, online and via wireless handheld devices. It uses multiple platforms to reach its weekly audience of 166 million globally, including shortwave, AM, FM, digital satellite and cable channels. Its news sites include audio and video content and offer opportunities to join the global debate. BBC World Service offers its multilingual radio content to partner FM stations around the world and has numerous partnerships supplying content to news websites, mobile phones and other wireless handheld devices as well as TV channels. For more information, visit: www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice

Backgrounder: Per-Country Charts

Methodology

In total 17,589 citizens in Australia, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru, Russia, South Korea, Spain, the UK, and the United States were interviewed face-to-face or by telephone between December 17, 2013 and February 27, 2014. Questions were asked by half samples in all countries polled. Polling was conducted for BBC World Service by GlobeScan and its research partners in each country.

In China, Indonesia, and Kenya urban samples were used. The margin of error per country ranges from +/- 2.9 to 4.9 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

Country
Sample Size (unweighted)
Field dates
Sample frame
Survey methodology
Type of sample
Australia 806 January 13, 2014 – February 18, 2014 18+ Telephone National
Canada 1004 January 10, 2014 – February 18, 2014 18+ Telephone National
China 1000 January 14, 2014 – February 23, 2014 18+ Telephone Urban1
France 1004 January 20, 2014 – February 3, 2014 18+ Telephone National
Germany 1004 January 21, 2014 – February 17, 2014 16-70 Telephone National
India 1160 February 10, 2014 – February 22, 2014 18+ Face-to-face National
Indonesia 1000 February 4, 2014 – February 27, 2014 18+ Face-to-face Urban2
Kenya 1010 February 4, 2014 – February 16, 2014 18+ Face-to-face Urban3
Mexico 800 February 22, 2014 – February 27, 2014 18+ Face-to-face National
Nigeria 800 February 12, 2014 – February 20, 2014 18+ Face-to-face National
Pakistan 2168 January 27, 2014 – February 15, 2014 18+ Face-to-face National
Peru 1008 February 5, 2014 – February 12, 2014 18-70 Face-to-face National
Russia 1021 January 24, 2014 – February 19, 2014 18+ Face-to-face National
South Korea 1000 February 8, 2014 – February 11, 2014 19+ Telephone National
Spain 800 December 17, 2014 – January 7, 2014 18+ Telephone National
United Kingdom 1000 January 14, 2014 – February 22, 2014 18+ Telephone National
USA 1004 January 10, 2014 – January 17, 2014 18+ Telephone National

 

  1. In China the survey was conducted in Beijing, Beiliu, Chengdu, Dujiangyan, Fenyang, Fuyang, Guangzhou, Hangzhou, Manzhouli, Quanzhou, Qujing, Shanghai, Shenyang, Shuangcheng, Wuhan, Xi’an, Xining, and Zhengzhou, representing 45 per cent of the national adult population.
  2. In Indonesia the survey was conducted in Bandung, Jakarta, Makassar, Medan, and Surabaya, representing 27 per cent of the national adult population.
  3. In Kenya the survey was conducted in Kakamega, Kisumu, Machakos, Mombasa, Nairobi, Nakuru, and Nyeri, representing 45 per cent of the national adult population.

Research Partners

Country Research Institute Location Contact
Australia GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767
Canada GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767
China GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767
France Efficience 3 Paris and Rheims Thierry Laurain
thierry.l@efficience3.com
+33 1 4316 5442
Germany Ri*QUESTA GmbH Teningen Bernhard Rieder
riquesta.rieder@t-online.de
+49 7641 93 43 36
India Team C Voter Noida Yashwant Deshmukh
yashwant@teamcvoter.com
+91 120 424 7135
Indonesia DEKA Marketing Research Jakarta Ratna Mulia Darmawan
ratna.darmawan@deka-research.co.id
+62 21 723 6901
Kenya Research Path Associates Ltd. Nairobi Charles Onsongo
charles.onsongo@rpa.co.ke
+254 20 2734770
Mexico Parametría Mexico City Francisco Abundis
fabundis@parametria.com.mx
+52 55 2614 0089
Nigeria Market Trends Lagos Jo Ebhomenye
joebhomenye@hotmail.com
+234 1734 7384
Pakistan Gallup Pakistan Islamabad Ijaz Shafi Gilani
isb@gallup.com.pk
+92 51 2655630
Peru Datum Lima Urpi Torrado
urpi@datum.com.pe
+511 215 0600
Russia CESSI Institute for Comparative Social Research Moscow Vladimir Andreenkov
vladimir.andreenkov@cessi.ru
+7 495 650 55 18
South Korea East Asia Institute Seoul Wonchil Chung
cwc@eai.or.kr
+82 2 2277 1683
Spain Sigma Dos Int. Madrid Petrana Valentinova
petrana@sigmados.com
+34 91 360 0474
United Kingdom Populus Data Solutions London Patrick Diamond
pdiamond@populusdatasolutions.com
+44 207 553 4148
USA GlobeScan Toronto Robin Miller
robin.miller@globescan.com
+1 647 528 2767

Question Wording

M2A. Please consider the following freedoms as they exist in [Country] today. For each, please tell me how free you feel. What about the [INSERT STATEMENTS]; do you feel totally free, somewhat free, not very free, or not at all free?

READ OUT. ROTATE ORDER. CODE ONE.

a) Freedom to discuss any issue in public

01 – Totally free
02 – Somewhat free
03 – Not very free
04 – Not at all free
VOLUNTEERED (DO NOT READ)
98 – Depends
99 – DK/NA

b) Freedom to openly practice the religion of your choice

c) Freedom to marry or live with the person of your choosing

d) Freedom from government surveillance or monitoring

M2B. To what extent do you agree or disagree that:

READ OUT. ROTATE ORDER.

a) The internet gives me greater freedom

b) The internet is a safe place to express my opinions

01 – Strongly agree
02 – Somewhat agree
03 – Somewhat disagree
04 – Strongly disagree
VOLUNTEERED (DO NOT READ)
99 – DK/NA


M3Bt
. On a scale of 5 to 1, where 5 means “very free” and 1 means “not at all free”, how free do you think the press and media is in [Country] to be able to report the news accurately, truthfully and without undue bias?

CODE ONE.

01 – Not at all free
02
03
04
05 – Very free
VOLUNTEERED (DO NOT READ)
98 – Depends
99 – DK/NA

Views of China and India Slide While UK’s Ratings Climb

Header---BBC-Press-Releases

22 May 2013 – Positive views of China and India have fallen sharply around the world over the last year, a new 25-country poll for BBC World Service indicates.

The poll also finds that views of the UK have improved in the wake of its hosting of the 2012 Olympics, making the UK the third most positively rated country. Of the other fifteen countries rated, nine saw their ratings positive worsen this year while the UK was the most improved.

The 2013 Country Ratings Poll, conducted by GlobeScan/PIPA among 26,299 people around the world between December 2012 and April 2013, asked respondents to rate 16 countries and the EU on whether their influence in the world is “mostly positive” or “mostly negative.”

Avg of 22 Countries

 

On average positive views of China across 21 tracking countries have dropped eight points to 42 per cent while negative views have risen by the same amount to reach 39 per cent. After improving for several years, views of China have sunk to their lowest level since polling began in 2005. India has shown a similar decline, with negative views up eight points and positive views down six. For the first time this year, those negative views (35%) slightly outnumber those with positive views of India (34%). Overall, China is ranked ninth, while India is ranked twelfth.

Germany regained the position of the most favourably viewed country, with 59 per cent worldwide rating it positively. It displaces Japan, which saw its positive ratings plunge from 58 to 51 per cent and fell from first to fourth place overall. The UK, rated positively by 55 per cent, has climbed from fourth to third place with a four-point increase in positive views since 2012, more than for any other country.

Positive views of the EU dropped to their lowest level last year but have stabilised this year, rising one point to 49% on average among the tracking countries. But this masks significant movements: while views in some countries recovered after last year’s slump, there has been a sharp drop in positive ratings by Germans (down 14 points to 59% this year), Egyptians (down 22 points to 29%), Canadians and Americans (respectively 51% and 46%, both down ten points). Among Britons, positive views of EU influence have been falling steadily since 2008, and for the first time this year, more rate it negatively (47%) than positively (42%).

Views of the US have shown some sharp declines among the citizens of its allies the UK (46%, down from 60%), France (52%, down from 62%), and Germany (35%, down from 44%), as well as in Egypt (24%, down from 37%).  On a global scale, however, views have only slipped slightly (from 47% to 45% positive, with 34% now negative).

Iran is once again the most negatively viewed country, with negative ratings climbing four points to 59%. Most people also give negative ratings to Pakistan (56%, up five points), North Korea (55%, up three points) and Israel (52%, up one point).

Steven Kull, Director of PIPA, commented: “While China and India’s prestige was enhanced by defying the gravity of the economic downturn, they seem to be falling back to earth with slowing growth rates and a perception of widespread corruption. The scandals surrounding the treatment of women in India may also have had an impact on this year’s findings.”

GlobeScan Director Sam Mountford commented: “With ratings of most countries declining this year, it appears that frustration with governments in general is growing, as nearly five years on from the financial crisis they seem incapable of pulling their economies out of the slump. But the ‘Olympics effect’ looks to have allowed the UK to buck this negative global trend.”

A total of 26,299 citizens across 25 countries were interviewed face-to-face or by telephone between December 10, 2012 and April 9, 2013. Polling was conducted for BBC World Service by the international polling firm GlobeScan and its research partners in each country, together with the Program on International Policy Attitudes (PIPA) at the University of Maryland. Countries were rated by half samples in all countries polled except for Egypt, India, Japan, and Poland. In six of the 25 countries, the sample was limited to major urban areas. The margin of error per country ranges from +/- 3.0 to 4.9 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

 

For full methodology, question wording, and detailed results, including region-by-region data for all key questions, please see the drop-down links at the bottom of this article.

 

For more details, please visit www.GlobeScan.com or www.WorldPublicOpinion.org as well as the GlobeScan Featured Findings www.globescan.com/commentary-and-analysis/featured-findings.html

– 30 –


Participating Countries

Participating Countries

In Brazil, China, Egypt, Indonesia, Kenya, and Turkey, urban samples were used.


Long-Term Trends

The charts below show the long-term trends in country ratings based only on the 12 countries in which the survey has been conducted every year since 2005. The average figures given here will therefore differ from the figures quoted elsewhere in this document.

Tracking Ratings 1

Tracking Ratings 2


Media Contacts

For media interviews with the participating pollsters, please contact:


About The Program on International Policy Attitudes (PIPA)

The Program on International Policy Attitudes (PIPA) of the Center for International and Security Studies at the University of Maryland, undertakes research on attitudes in publics around the world on a variety of international issues and manages the international research project. For more information, visit: www.WorldPublicOpinion.org

About BBC World Service

BBC World Service is an international multimedia broadcaster, delivering a wide range of language and regional services on radio, TV, online and via wireless handheld devices. It uses multiple platforms to reach its weekly audience of 166 million globally, including shortwave, AM, FM, digital satellite and cable channels. Its news sites include audio and video content and offer opportunities to join the global debate. BBC World Service offers its multilingual radio content to partner FM stations around the world and has numerous partnerships supplying content to news websites, mobile phones and other wireless handheld devices as well as TV channels. For more information, visit: www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice

Backgrounder: Region-by-Region Results

The following sections examine in detail the poll results for each of the countries rated.

China

China

Global views of China have plummeted in 2013, abruptly reversing the trend started in 2010. On average, in the 21 tracking countries1 surveyed both in 2012 and 2013, 41 per cent of respondents hold positive views of China’s influence, while 39 per cent hold negative views. This represents a substantial decline since 2012, with positive views decreasing and negative views increasing by eight points each. After several years of improving and positive perceptions, global views of China have shifted to become divided overall. In terms of positive views, China now ranks ninth out 17 countries rated, including the EU: this is four places lower than in 2012. Of the 25 countries surveyed in 2013, 12 countries hold positive views of China and 13 hold negative views.

The most favourable views towards China are found in the same countries as in 2012. Despite a decline in overall impressions, the Sub-Saharan countries surveyed continue to give among the highest ratings of China. Positive views are held by 78 per cent of Nigerians, despite a drop of 11 points since 2012, and by 68 per cent of Ghanaians, where negative views have more than doubled over the past year (21%, up 11 points). The cooling of views is more marked in Kenya, where positive views have fallen 17 points, to 58 per cent. To the north, Egypt bucks this trend, with favourable views rising seven points (to 57%, yielding the fourth highest proportion of positive views of China) and negative ratings falling 14 points (to 11%).

Pakistan is the survey country where public opinion of China is most favourable. Over four in five Pakistanis (81%) have favourable perceptions of Chinese influence (up five points): this percentage has steadily increased since 2010, when positive views accounted for just 56 per cent.

Views of China are also comfortably positive among the other BRIC countries. They have particularly warmed in Brazil, with both an increase in positive ratings (54%, up six points from last year) and a decrease in negative ratings (24%, down seven points). Strong pluralities also lean favourable in Russia (42% positive vs 24% negative) and in India, where public opinion has shifted from being divided in 2012 (30% vs 31%) to firmly positive this year (36% vs 27%).

The overall slip in views of China is largely driven by a strong deterioration of perceptions within the EU, where the marked improvement seen last year did not continue. Views have declined sharply in the UK, Germany, France, and Spain. The change in Britons’ perceptions over the last year is particularly striking, as favourable views have dropped 20 points (down to 37%) while negative perceptions have surged (up 18 points to 50%). British opinion of Chinese influence has therefore shifted from positive in 2012 to firmly negative this year. Double-digit movement in both positive and negative views has pushed German opinion much deeper into negative territory (13% positive vs 67% negative in 2013, from 42% positive vs 47% negative in 2012). Attitudes toward China have worsened dramatically in France and in Spain, where the percentage of negative views are the highest and second-highest respectively (68% and 67%, up 19 points in both cases). Two countries surveyed for the first time this year, Greece and Poland, also yield negative results with respective pluralities of 41 and 38 per cent holding unfavourable views.

Views in NAFTA countries have also pulled China’s global image down. In both Canada and the USA, the proportion of positive views has reached a record low since tracking began in 2005. Abrupt double-digit figure changes among Canadians and Americans resulted in a shift of overall attitudes towards China. Leaning favourably in 2012 (53% positive vs 36% negative), Canadian opinion is now back into negative territory (29% vs 59%). Simultaneously, Americans have shifted from being divided in 2012 (42% vs 46%) to being extremely negative this year (23% vs 67%). Though not to the same extent, there has been a similar movement in Mexico, where a plurality now holds unfavourable views (47%, up ten points to a record high since 2005) after being equally split in 2012 (37% vs 37%).

The picture in regions close to China also does not look positive. Views of China from its neighbours to the east have sharply deteriorated. Only 23 per cent of South Koreans hold favourable views, down ten points since last year, while above six in ten lean negatively (61%). Japanese responses are the most negative in the region, with 64 per cent holding unfavourable views (up 14 points) and five per cent holding positive ones (down five points, yielding the lowest rating of China’s influence in the survey). In Australia, perceptions have dramatically reversed from being strongly positive in 2012 (61% positive vs 29% negative) to leaning negative in 2013 (36% vs 55%). Bucking this downward trend, however, the opinion of China among Indonesians remains strongly positive and stable (55% positive vs 27% negative).

1All quoted tracking averages exclude the views of the nation being rated about itself, where applicable.

India

India

As for China, global views of India have sharply and suddenly deteriorated in 2013. On average, in the 21 tracking countries surveyed in both years, 34 per cent have positive views of Indian influence in the world, six points down from 2012. At the same time, 35 per cent have negative views (up eight points). For the first time, more respondents lean negatively towards India than positively. Out the 25 countries surveyed this year, ten lean positive, 11 lean negative, and four countries are divided.

Some of the most positive views are found in Sub-Saharan Africa, particularly in Nigeria and Ghana. Nigerians are the most favourable towards India (57% positive, the highest percentage in the survey), and are closely followed by Ghanaians (46%, up 13 points). In Ghana, however, the increase in positive ratings has been counterbalanced by a similar rise in negative views (29%, up 14 points). In other African surveyed countries, views have cooled: a plurality of 35 per cent remains positive in Kenya, down from 45 per cent in 2012, while in Egypt, public opinion has shifted from leaning positive in 2012 (37% positive vs 29% negative) to being divided, following a 12-point drop in positive ratings (25% vs 29%).

Apart from Nigeria, the most favourable sentiment towards India is found in Indonesia where a stable majority of 51 per cent leans favourably—although negative views have gone up by seven points to 21 per cent. Attitudes among Japanese respondents also remain positive and stable (42% positive vs 4% negative, the lowest percentage of negative views of India in the survey).

Among the other BRIC countries, views among Russians continue to be strongly favourable (42% positive vs 9% negative), but perceptions have deteriorated in China and in Brazil. In China, the opinion was somewhat negative in 2012 and the trend has worsened this year following a 12-point drop in positive ratings (to 23%) along with a slight five-point rise in negative views (to 45%). In Brazil, the opinion has shifted from leaning somewhat positive in 2012 (39% positive vs 34% negative) to being negative this year (26% vs 37%).

The cooling sentiment towards India observed globally is also driven by increasingly negative perceptions coming from Western Europe and North America. In the latter, views have sharply deteriorated in Canada, where opinion has shifted from favourable in 2012 (53% positive vs 31% negative) to firmly negative (35% vs 49%). In the USA, a 13-point drop in positive ratings, combined with an 11-point rise in negative views, has left a plurality of 43% leaning somewhat positive, compared to 37 per cent who now hold unfavourable views of India’s influence on the world stage.

In Europe, public opinion has shifted in France, Germany, Spain, and the UK. Following pronounced drops in positive ratings matched by increases in negative views, the British and the French have become divided after leaning strongly positive in 2012. Forty-three per cent of Britons now say they have positive views of Indian influence (down 13 points) and 42 per cent feel the same in France (down seven points). At the same time, however, 42 and 44 per cent respectively have unfavourable views (up ten points in both cases). The deterioration of overall perceptions is even sharper in Spain and in Germany, where unfavourable sentiment has surged—in the case of Spain, to unprecedented levels. Fifty-six per cent of Spaniards give India a negative rating, up 26 points since 2012, while one in two Germans feel the same (50%, up 24 points). In these two countries, the proportions of those holding positive views are the lowest in the survey (14% and 13%, respectively). Poland is the only EU country where a plurality of the public regards India positively (33% vs 16%).

Attitudes in Latin American countries are mixed. In addition to the deterioration of views already mentioned in Brazil, opinion has also cooled in Mexico. Divided in 2012, Mexicans are now negative overall, after an 11-point increase in negative ratings (27% positive vs 36% negative). In Peru, perceptions remain stable and divided (25% vs 25%). Chile is the only surveyed country in this region where views have warmed, following a 13-point increase in favourable opinion (46%), returning to similar levels to 2011.

In Australia, views follow the same pattern seen in most Western countries: positive ratings have plummeted (28%, down 16 points) while negative ratings have gone up sharply (56%, up 16 points). As a result, Australian opinion has shifted from being divided to being strongly negative on balance. A similar shift has occurred in South Korea, where the proportion of positive views towards India has dropped eight points to 34 per cent, while negative ratings have remained stable (42%). In neighbouring Pakistan, attitudes have further worsened, and a majority of 54 per cent now holds negative views (up seven points).

The United Kingdom

UK

Views of the United Kingdom have improved significantly in 2013, almost completely recovering from the large decrease that occurred in 2012. In the 21 tracking countries surveyed both in 2012 and 2013, 55 per cent on average now say that British influence is positive. With a four-point increase in positive views since 2012, this rise is more than for any other country evaluated. Over the same period, negative opinions have decreased two points to 18 per cent. Britain is now ranked third in perceived positive influence in the world, up one place since 2012. In the 25 countries surveyed this year, predominantly positive views of the UK are found in 22, and only the publics of Greece and Turkey lean negatively. Opinion in Pakistan is divided.

The most favourable attitudes toward the UK are notably found in Sub-Saharan Africa. Ghanaians view British influence most positively with almost nine out of ten people holding positive views (88%, up 25 points). Nigerians are close behind (75% positive, stable from last year), as are Kenyans (70%, down five points). Public sentiment toward the UK is also positive among Egyptians, though to a lesser extent. A stable plurality of 41 per cent of Egyptians leans favourably, while negative ratings have decreased (20%, down nine points).

Views in fellow Anglophone countries remain very positive, with Americans and Canadians maintaining favourable opinions of British influence (74% and 69% respectively). Australians also hold positive views, but overall opinion has cooled since 2012 (61% positive vs 25% negative this year, 73% vs 17% last year)

British influence is rated most poorly in Greece (27% positive vs 38% negative). Otherwise, all EU countries rate British influence positively. Positive views have increased considerably in France (64%, up 12 points) and in Spain (66%, up 17 points). Poland is also very upbeat about the UK’s influence, with 68 per cent responding positively. While still positive on balance, however, positive views in Germany have declined for the last two years (48%, down five points since 2012 and 19 points since 2011), while negative views have increased 12 points in the last year, to 19 per cent. At the periphery of Europe, Russians show stable and favourable inclinations, with a plurality of 44 per cent leaning positive. However, opinion in Turkey has shifted since 2011: divided two years ago (41% positive vs 40% negative), Turks are now leaning negatively (31% vs 40%).

All countries surveyed in Latin America view British influence positively, with perceptions being most favourable in Chile (55%, up 15 points). Opinions in Brazil and Peru are much more mixed, with relatively small pluralities of 33 and 30 per cent respectively giving positive ratings to the UK’s influence in the world, and almost half of respondents in both countries not giving a clear rating. Overall, views have deteriorated in Peru and are now just somewhat positive (30% positive vs 25% negative). In Brazil, however, negative views have decreased by ten points to 19 per cent.

Among Asian countries, opinions of British influence are positive overall. South Koreans (67% positive vs 13% negative) and Indonesians (65% vs 15%) rate British influence the most highly in Asia. Perceptions in both countries have improved, with a ten-point increase in positive ratings among Indonesians and a 12-point drop in negative ratings among South Koreans. The greatest positive change in the region is in India, where positive views have surged 20 points to 49 per cent, and negative views have decreased seven points to 16 per cent. In China and in Japan, stable pluralities continue to hold favourable views of the UK (48% and 44% respectively). Only Pakistan is split in its citizens’ opinions, with 35 per cent holding positive views and 36 per cent holding negative views; however, the picture has noticeably improved since 2012, when Pakistanis leaned negative (24% positive vs 32% negative).

 

Japan

Japan

Views of Japan’s positive influence have declined considerably in 2013, halting an improving trend that had been going for several years. On average, in the 21 tracking countries surveyed both in 2012 and 2013, 51 per cent hold positive views of Japan. This is seven points down from the 2012 level. At the same time, negative views have gone up six points to 27 per cent. This has dropped the country’s ranking from its first place position last year to fourth place. Despite this, the spread by country shows how global perceptions remain strongly positive. Out of the 25 countries surveyed in 2012, 20 lean positive, three lean negative, and two are split in their views (Mexico and Spain).

The most favourable views of Japan are found in Indonesia (82%, up five points) and in Nigeria (75%), although positive sentiment among Nigerians has dropped slightly (down five points) since 2012. Views of Japan are also quite high and have strengthened in Brazil with 71 per cent having positive views (up 11 points), while just ten per cent hold opposite views (down 12 points). All surveyed publics in South America have favourable perceptions of Japan. After Brazilians (71%, up 11 points), Chileans have the most favourable views in this region (66%, up nine points), and Peruvian attitudes have also warmed, with 64 per cent giving positive ratings to Japan (up seven points), while only 15 per cent have negative perceptions.

The global decline in views of Japan is driven by perceptions in the EU. Across all EU countries surveyed (excluding Greece and Poland, included in the survey this year for the first time), views of Japan’s influence have sharply declined since 2012—although the perceived influence of Japan in the world remains largely positive overall. Majorities in Poland (59%) and Greece (50%) approve of Japan’s influence. Positive views are the highest in Europe among the populations of the UK (59%) and France (56%), but they have fallen in both countries, by 11 and ten points respectively, concurrently with ten- and eight-point increases in negative ratings (to 27% and 32% respectively). Overall, attitudes toward Japan have deteriorated much more in Spain, where they have dropped 26 points (down to 36%), and in Germany, where positive ratings decreased by 30 points (to 28%). German views have thus shifted and the country has moved from leaning strongly positive in 2012 to leaning strongly negative this year (28% positive vs 46% negative). In Spain, the opinion is now divided (36% vs 32%).

The decline is also driven by worsening perceptions among Japan’s neighbouring countries. Views of Japan’s influence are the least favourable in China, with just 17 per cent holding positive views versus 74 per cent giving it negative ratings (up nine points). Continuing a downward trend started in 2011, South Koreans have a more unfavourable view of Japan’s influence than they did last year (21% positive, down 17 points, vs 67% negative, up nine points).

In other Asian countries surveyed, pluralities in Pakistan (45% positive) and India (33%, down nine points) remain favourable, but attitudes have cooled somewhat in both countries. Respondents in Australia also continue to lean positively, but less so than in 2012: the proportion of those holding positive views has dropped 12 points to 53 per cent, and negative views have risen by 13 points to 36 per cent.

In NAFTA countries, majorities of Canadians and Americans continue to hold favourable views of Japan (61% and 66% respectively), but these proportions have decreased by nine points in the case of Canada and eight in the case of the USA. Also, more respondents in Canada rate Japan negatively in 2013 compared to last year (23%, up seven points). In Mexico, the pattern of worsening attitudes holds: opinions have polarised since 2012, as 42 per cent now hold positive views of Japan’s influence, and 38 per cent hold negative views (up 12 points). Mexicans are now divided—a shift from their favourable inclinations in 2012.

Among the African countries not yet discussed, Japan’s influence remains positive overall. In Ghana, more respondents rate Japan favourably this year (59%, up 11 points) but there has also been an increase in those who rate it negatively (20%, up ten points). In the two other African countries surveyed, positive sentiment has declined since 2012: in Egypt, it has gone down 13 points to 44 per cent, and in Kenya, it has gone down ten points to 58 per cent. Nonetheless, there is still a sizeable gap between those who hold positive and negative views in all African countries.

 

The European Union

EU

The haemorrhage that affected the EU’s global influence ratings last year has stopped in 2013, and views of the supranational entity have started to recover, albeit slowly. On average, 49 per cent of respondents in the 22 tracking countries surveyed in 2012 and 2013 have positive attitudes about the Union—one point above the 2012 level. At the same time, negative perceptions have dropped by the same margin to 24 per cent. Of the 25 countries surveyed in 2013, 19 lean positive, three lean negative, and three are divided.

Strong and stable majorities continue to give the EU favourable ratings in France (68%) and in Spain (60%, and negative ratings have dropped eight points to 13%). Newly surveyed this year, Poland shows very favourable inclinations towards the EU, with 68 per cent of its citizens rating its influence positively—the second highest percentage in the survey, alongside France. However, in Greece, also surveyed for the first time this year, views are divided (35% positive vs 37% negative), and Greeks are the least positive towards the influence of the EU within Europe. Such attitudes are matched across the world in Australia, where views have remained stable: Australians continue to be divided in their attitudes towards the EU (41% positive vs 42% negative).

Positive views have plummeted in Germany, one of the core members of the EU. Only 59 per cent continue to rate the EU positively, compared to 73 per cent in 2012. This is by far the lowest proportion of positive ratings recorded in Germany since 2006. In the UK, the decrease in overall attitudes towards the EU started in 2010 has continued: now, for the first time since tracking began in 2006, more Britons feel negatively about how they perceive the influence of the EU than do positively. Forty-two per cent hold positive views, and 47 per cent hold negative ones.

In the EU’s closest neighbouring countries, perceptions among Russians have remained stable and positive (41% positive vs 19% negative), but Turkish opinion has shifted from leaning positive in 2011 (46% vs 29%) to leaning negative in 2013 (38% vs 46%).

In North America, the EU continues to enjoy favourable ratings, but positive perceptions have slipped in Canada, the US, and Mexico, continuing the decline started in 2011. In Canada and the US, positive ratings have decreased by ten points (respectively to 51% and 46%), but negative ratings have stabilised. The mood in Mexico has cooled due to a seven-point increase in negative ratings (to 34%) while a plurality of 42 per cent are still holding favourable views. In South America, positive views of the EU among Peruvians and Chileans have increased (48%, up 11 points in Peru; 60%, up nine points in Chile).

Among the BRIC countries, apart from previously mentioned Russia, views have markedly improved in Brazil and in India, and are back to levels similar before the big 2012 slip. Forty-seven per cent of Brazilians consider the influence of the EU to be mainly positive (up eight points since 2012), as do 33 per cent of Indians (up nine points). In both countries, the publics have shifted from being divided in 2012 to leaning positive this year. In China, a plurality of 40 per cent holds favourable views, but positive perceptions have cooled a little since 2012 (down six points).

In the Sub-Saharan countries surveyed, views are very solidly entrenched in positive territory. With 79 per cent of favourable opinion, surging up 31 points since 2012, Ghana is the most upbeat in the survey about the EU’s influence. In Nigeria and in Kenya, respondents continue to be very warm in their attitudes towards the EU with 58 and 60 per cent respectively giving positive ratings. To the north, however, Egyptian public sentiment has reversed since 2012: positive ratings have plunged so that only 29 per cent lean favourably towards the EU, compared to the 51 per cent observed last year. As a result, Egyptians are now divided in their opinions (29% positive vs 27% negative).

In Asia, South Koreans show high levels of satisfaction with the EU’s influence in the world stage. Sixty-five per cent give it positive ratings (stable) while just 15 per cent feel the opposite (down 11 points). Views among Japanese citizens have gotten much warmer thanks to a nine-point rise in positive ratings (to 32%) combined with a seven-point drop in negative ratings (to 11%).

Pakistan is the least favourable towards the EU out of all the countries surveyed, with less than a quarter of respondents (23%) rating the EU positively—even though this is up ten points since 2012. Perceptions in another Muslim country in the region, Indonesia, have evolved differently: positive views have reached 50 per cent (up 16 points) while unfavourable ratings have remained steady at 22 per cent.

 

The United States

USA

 

Positive views of the USA have slid further down in 2013, continuing the slow decline started last year. In the 21 tracking countries surveyed both in 2012 and 2013, 45 per cent of respondents on average have positive views of American influence in the world (47% in 2012), while 34 per cent hold negative views (up one point from 33% in 2012). In terms of positive views, the USA still ranks eighth out of 17 countries rated, including the EU. Of the 25 countries surveyed about the USA’s influence in 2013, 13 countries hold positive views, seven hold negative views, and five are divided.

The most favourable views of the USA continue to be found in Sub-Saharan Africa. In Ghana, positive views have gone up 21 points over the past year, and 82 per cent of Ghanaians now have positive views of American influence. Ghana is followed by Kenya (69%), despite a ten-point drop in positive views, and Nigeria (67%).

In Latin American countries, attitudes are mostly positive. Chile is the most favourable towards the USA with 62 per cent of positive ratings (up 15 points), followed by Brazil and Peru, with 59 and 55 per cent respectively holding positive views. Positive ratings in the latter country have increased by nine points. Favourable views in Brazil have become more dominant due to a seven-point drop in negative views, from 30 to 23 per cent. Mexico, however, bucks this positive outlook among Latin American nations, as the country remains divided in its perceptions of its northern neighbour’s influence (41% positive vs 43% negative).

Views in Canada—the USA’s other neighbouring country—have deteriorated. Minor changes of opinions have caused the Canadians to shift from leaning somewhat positive in 2012 (48% positive vs 42% negative) to being divided in 2013 (45% vs 45%). These cooling views are also observed in other historically Anglo-Saxon countries, which are traditionally positive towards the United States. As in Canada, Australian views shifted from leaning positive in 2012 (50% vs 38%) to being divided this year (46% vs 42%). This attitudinal change is even more marked among Britons, where opinion is now also split. There, positive views of the USA have decreased 14 points while negative views have increased by the same amount, so that views are perfectly divided (46% vs 46%).

In the other European countries surveyed, Poland—a strong ally of the USA—holds the most favourable views, with 55 per cent leaning positive and just 15 per cent giving negative ratings to the United States’ influence in the world. The picture in other EU countries varies, with France and Spain being mostly positive, with 52 and 43 per cent respectively voicing favourable views, although French favour has cooled significantly, with a ten-point drop in positive views and a 12-point rise in negative ratings. Germans continue to be divided (35% vs 39%), while Greeks, surveyed for the first time, post very unfavourable views: a majority of 51 per cent says the USA’s influence is negative, with less than a quarter (23%) holding the opposing view. At the periphery of Europe, views continue to be negative: majorities of Turks (59%) and Russians (53%) have negative perceptions of American influence.

In Asia, South Koreans are the most favourable towards the USA, with 58 per cent posting positive ratings of USA influence. Japan and India continue to have pluralities leaning positively (42% and 40%, respectively), and views among Japanese have markedly improved—positive views are up ten points and negative views are down five points. Views in Indonesia have shifted from being somewhat positive in 2012 (43% positive vs 37% negative) to being somewhat negative this year (38% vs 44%). Views in China have worsened: only one in five Chinese respondents (20%) hold positive views (down nine points). With 57 per cent holding negative views (up nine points), China has the third-most negative attitude towards the USA, after Pakistan (stable at 64%) and Turkey.

 

Germany

Germany

Global views of Germany have improved significantly in 2013, and the country has returned to its position as the most favourably viewed nation overall. On average, in the 21 tracking countries surveyed both in 2012 and 2013, 59 per cent of people rate Germany positively. This is the highest percentage out of all countries evaluated and represents a three-point increase since last year. At the same time, negative views have receded by one point globally, down to 15 per cent—the second lowest proportion after Canada. Of the 25 countries polled in 2012, 23 lean positive, one is divided (Pakistan), and one leans negative (Greece).

Perceptions of Germany have improved quite significantly in two EU countries. This is the case in the UK, where favourable attitudes have gone up by eight points (78%) while negative ratings have decreased nine points (12%). The movement is similar in Spain, with increased proportions holding positive views (68%, up eight points) and fewer holding unfavourable ones (13%, down 14 points). Among other European countries, the French have the most favourable views of their neighbour (81% positive, as in 2012, and the second highest percentage in the survey). Germany’s neighbour Poland has very favourable attitude as well, with two-thirds of Poles (67%) feeling positive, against a meagre eight per cent holding negative views.

At the periphery of the EU, views among Russians and Turks are also positive (55% and 46% respectively) even though favourable ratings in Russia have diminished by seven points since 2012. Greeks, who were asked to evaluate how they perceive German influence for the first time, have very different views. Greeks are the only respondents voicing a negative sentiment towards Germany, with a majority of 52 per cent giving negative ratings, against the 25 per cent giving positive ones.

In North America, attitudes have remained strongly favourable and stable overall, with positive majorities of 71 and 69 per cent in the US and Canada, respectively.

Other groups driving favourable sentiment toward Germany are found among the Asian OECD countries, such as Australia (76% positive vs 10% negative), South Korea (76% vs 8%), and Japan (47% vs 3%). Perceptions have remained stable among Australians and South Koreans, but the Japanese have warmed to the perceived influence of Germany, as positive ratings have gone up by 11 points since 2012.

Attitudes towards Germany in the BRIC countries are overall comfortably positive. After Russia, (55% positive), closely followed by Brazil (53%) where public opinion has improved after negative ratings plummeted (15%, down 15 points). Views in China are stable with a plurality of 48 per cent holding favourable views. India is also positive overall (27% positive vs 14% negative), but a large majority of 59 per cent express no a clear opinion about Germany.

In the rest of Latin America, Germany’s reputation is solid and improving in Chile (58% positive, up ten points), Mexico (54%, up 13 points), and Peru (43%, up eight points).

In Muslim countries, approval of Germany’s influence has improved in Pakistan, where opinion has shifted from leaning somewhat negative in 2012 (21% positive vs 26% negative) to being divided this year (29% vs 26%). The mood in Egypt has remained stable and favourable, with 43 per cent of respondent leaning positive, twice as many as those who lean negative (21%). In Indonesia, sentiment towards Germany remains very favourable (60% positive), despite an eight-point increase in negative ratings (21%).

In Africa, positivity prevails in Nigeria, though favourable views have gone down 11 points from the 2012 record of 80 per cent positive ratings.

In the rest of Africa, Ghanaians emerge as the most favourable toward Germany in 2013, with 84 per cent approving of its role in the world (up from 56% the previous year), while Kenyan attitudes have cooled a little while remaining firmly in positive territory overall (52% positive, down nine points).

 

Canada

Canada

Global views of Canada have improved in 2013, erasing the dip that was observed last year. In the 21 tracking countries surveyed both in 2012 and 2013, 55 per cent of people on average have positive views of Canadian influence in the world (53% in 2012), and 13 per cent hold negative views (down one point). In terms of positive views, Canada has gone up one rank to reach second place out of all countries rated. Perceptions of Canada are positive globally: of the 25 countries surveyed in 2013, all are on balance positive about Canada’s influence except Pakistan, where opinion continues to be divided (27% positive vs 29% negative), as in 2012.

The most favourable views about Canada are found in the US (84% and stable), France (82% and stable), the UK (80%, up seven points), and Australia (79%, but down five points).

In other EU countries, views are also very favourable, as in Poland (61% positive vs 4% negative) and Greece (56% vs 10%). In Spain, sentiment towards Canada has improved strikingly, with a 19-point increase in positive ratings (74%). This contrasts with the sudden cooling of German views: favourable perceptions have dropped 24 points, leaving a small majority of 51 per cent leaning positively.

At the periphery of Europe, Russia and Turkey continue to have pluralities who feel positively about the perceived influence of Canada in the world—40 and 43 per cent respectively. However, with 34 per cent holding negative views, the Turks are the second most negative group about Canada’s influence out of all countries surveyed.

African countries are positive about Canada’s influence, particularly in Ghana where favourable ratings have gone up 23 points to 70 per cent. The pictures in Nigeria and in Kenya have remained fairly stable, if slightly cooler, with 52 and 43 per cent respectively leaning positively towards Canada. A small plurality of Egyptians (27%) holds favourable views, but opinion in the country has become more undecided compared to last year, with drops recorded both for positive ratings (down ten points) and negative ratings (down seven points to 15%). This leaves high numbers of Egyptians unable or unwilling to take a clear stance (58%, up 17 points).

Views of Canada in the Americas have become much warmer overall. The highest proportion of positive ratings there is found in Chile, with 58 per cent (up nine points). In Brazil, positive views have also strengthened (51, up ten points), and this concurred with a strong drop in negative ratings (17%, down 13 points). Perceptions of Canada in Peru have improved, with 11 per cent more leaning favourably (46%) compared to 2012. In Mexico, a country with strong ties to Canada through NAFTA, views have remained stable and positive (45% positive vs 27% negative).

In Asia, views have remained quite stable overall. They have barely moved in India, where a small plurality of 26 per cent leans positive against the 13 per cent who lean negative, leaving the opinion highly undecided overall (61%). No change is seen in Japanese opinion, either: 40 per cent lean positive and just 1 per cent are negative—the lowest percentage of negative views of Canada in the survey. Meanwhile, overall attitudes have improved in South Korea, with negative ratings dropping 13 points to reach an all-time low of 4 per cent, while 77 per cent of South Koreans posted favourable ratings of Canada’s influence in 2013. There has also been an improvement in Indonesia (49% positive, up seven points) and in China, where a majority of 55 per cent give positive ratings to Canada compared with just 15 per cent who feel the opposite (down seven points).

 

France

France

Views of France’s influence in the world have stabilised in 2013, following the sharp decline observed in 2012. In the 21 tracking countries surveyed both in 2012 and 2013, 49 per cent of respondents on average say that French influence in the world is positive. This is up one point compared to the previous year. At the same time, negative views have ebbed a little, down to 21 per cent from 22 per cent in 2012. Out of all countries rated, France has gone up one position to rank fifth in terms of positive views regarding its influence in the world. Of the 25 other countries polled in 2013, 22 lean positive, two lean negative (Turkey and Mexico), and one is divided (Pakistan).

France’s most favourable ratings are distributed around the world. Ghanaians are the most upbeat about the perceived French influence, with 68 per cent holding positive views thanks to an impressive 29-point increase since 2012. Opinion is also very positive—and stable—in Nigeria, where 61 per cent of the public acknowledges favourable perceptions of France. Stable and comfortable majorities with positive views are also found in South Korea (64%, where negative views have dropped 12 points to 13%), Chile (63%), Canada (60%), and Australia (57%).

Respondents in all surveyed European countries have strong and increasingly positive sentiment about France, except in Germany. Countries polled for the first time, namely Poland and Greece, post 60 per cent and 49 per cent positive views respectively, while just 8 and 17 per cent report negative attitudes. Poland is thus the most favourable country toward France in the EU. In Spain and in the UK, views have improved significantly after being moderately positive in 2012. A majority of 51 per cent of Spaniards holds favourable views (up eight points), while negative ratings have dropped ten points to 26 per cent. The picture is similar among the British (50% positive vs 34% negative), as negative views have decreased by seven points since last year. Bucking this favourable trend in Europe, however, views have dramatically cooled in Germany, where just 48 per cent continue to have favourable views of French influence—a 24-point drop since 2012 and the lowest percentage of positive views of France recorded in Germany since 2005.

Moving further afield, in the periphery of Europe, views have further deteriorated in Turkey since the last time the country was surveyed. Just above one in five Turks (21%) feel favourably toward France, compared with 64 per cent who feel French influence is negative—by far the highest proportion in the survey. As a result, Turkish opinion is now strongly negative overall, shifting from being divided in 2011 (36% positive vs 39% negative). Yet in Russia, views of France continue to be relatively stable and comfortable, with a plurality of 49 per cent seeing the country positively.

In the other BRIC countries, the public’s perceptions are positive and improving. Attitudes in China have continued to warm in 2013: a majority of 51 per cent now holds favourable views towards France (up seven points), while only 19 per cent feel negatively, down from 28 per cent in 2012. In Brazil, further improvement is seen with an eight-point drop in negative ratings (to 19%) while positive views remained stable (50%). In India, where opinion was divided in 2012, a very small shift in attitudes has resulted in the public being now somewhat positive (29% positive vs 23% negative).

Other countries with favourable views of France include Indonesia (56%, up seven points); Kenya, where a six-point drop in positive ratings (49%) was more than compensated by a 15-point drop in negative ratings (to 10%); Peru (43% positive, up ten points); the USA (48% positive, a similar result to last year); and Japan (33% positive and just 4% negative, a stable finding from last year).

In Egypt, the public remains positive (36% vs 26%) but overall attitudes have largely cooled following a 15-point drop in favourable perceptions. Views continue to be muted in Pakistan, but a 12-point increase in positive ratings has continued the gradual improvement in attitudes since 2010, making the opinion shift from negative to divided in 2013 (33% vs 31%).

Positive attitudes toward France among Mexicans has dropped 14 points, down to 31 per cent, while negative feelings have surged to 43 per cent (up from 21%). This shifts the overall opinion from comfortably positive in 2012 to negative in 2013.

 

Brazil

Brazil

Views of Brazil occupy a middle ranking position relative to the other countries (and the EU) evaluated in 2013, ranking seventh overall in terms of positive ratings. However, the overall picture for Brazil is less favourable than it was in 2012, owing to an increase in global negative ratings. On average, in the 21 tracking countries surveyed both in 2012 and 2013, 46 per cent say they have mainly positive perceptions of Brazil’s influence—this is one point above the proportion observed in 2012. However, at the same time, unfavourable views have increased by three points to 21 per cent. Out of the 25 countries surveyed in 2013, 19 lean positive, five are divided, and only one leans negative (Germany).

Brazilians themselves are the most positive about their country’s influence in the world, with 77 per cent mainly positive about it, although this has declined by 11 points in 2013. Fellow South American countries are the next-most positive about Brazil with a 12-point increase seen in Chile (73%, up 12 points), and a stable and strong majority of 65 per cent Peru.

Brazil does not enjoy particularly positive views among its BRIC counterparts, with India giving the fewest positive responses about Brazil’s influence of all countries surveyed. Only 18 per cent of Indians lean positive about Brazil (down nine points since 2012) and opinion has shifted from leaning positive in 2012 to being split in 2013 (18% vs 20%) with a majority undecided. China also has seen a decrease in its public’s positive views of Brazil, now down to 34 per cent following a seven-point decrease; the Chinese are also divided in 2013 (31% negative), a shift from 2012 when the opinion leaned positive (41% vs 31%). Incidentally, this is lowest proportion of positive ratings ever given by the Chinese about Brazil’s influence since tracking began there in 2008. Bucking this downward trend seen in India and Brazil, Russian views of Brazil have remained stable and positive (38% positive vs 8% negative).

NAFTA countries generally show positive views of Brazil, with some variations from one country to another. In Mexico, views have improved somewhat with 49 per cent holding favourable impressions (up six points) about Brazil, almost double the proportion of those holding unfavourable views (25%). The picture is similar in the US, where a majority of 50 per cent leans positive, but negative views have increased by nine points to 26 per cent. Strongly positive in 2012, views in Canada have declined to now be the least positive among NAFTA countries. Forty-four per cent of Canadians now think positively about Brazil, a decline of 13 points, while negative perceptions have risen ten points at the same time, reaching 29 per cent.

Brazil also enjoys strongly positive perceptions among two sub-Saharan African countries with Nigeria and Ghana the fourth and fifth most positive countries toward Brazil respectively. Positive views in Ghana have surged to 60 per cent, an increase of 29 points, while they have remained stable among Nigerians at 62 per cent. There is a marked difference in Kenya, where positive views have dropped nine points to 42 per cent, though views are still positive overall (42% vs 16%). In North Africa, views among Egyptians have cooled a little with a ten-point decrease in positive ratings (32%), though like in Kenya, overall attitudes remain favourable (32% vs 19%).

Among EU countries, views toward Brazil are wide-ranging, with the most positive views found in Spain (58%, up eight points), and France (54%). Views in France, however, have evolved differently from those in Spain, deteriorating sharply thanks to a nine-point drop in positive ratings combined with a 12-point increase in negative views (32%). Attitudes in the UK are positive overall and have remained stable (49% positive vs 27% negative). Newly asked this year, Poles and Greeks lean favourable with respective pluralities of 39 and 33 per cent, while in the European periphery, Turks are split in their views of Brazil (38% positive vs 34% negative).

Completely at odds with the overall positive perceptions in Europe, Germany comes out again as the least positive European country toward Brazil, and the second-least positive country overall, with just 19 per cent of Germans viewing it positively. With a dramatic 21-point increase in negative views (now at 40%), opinion has shifted from being divided in 2012 (22% vs 19%) to leaning negatively in 2013.

There has been an increase in positive views among the selected Asian countries, notably in Indonesia, where 54 per cent of the population are positive about Brazil, a ten-point increase since last year. Japan has also seen an increase of eight points since 2012, to 40 per cent positive. Pakistan, while sharing similarly low positive views with India, has nonetheless seen an eight-point increase in positive views to 27 per cent, but remains divided overall (27% vs 26%). Views among South Koreans have remained stable (49% vs 24%). Contrasting with this relatively positive regional outlook, views have greatly deteriorated among Australians: as with the Chinese, they have shifted from leaning positive in 2012 to being divided in 2013 (now 39% vs 37%) because of a 13-point rise in negative ratings and a six-point drop in positive ratings.

 

Pakistan

Pakistan

Views of Pakistan have deteriorated again in 2013, following the slight improvement that had been seen in 2012. On average, in the 21 tracking countries surveyed in both years, 15 per cent of respondents have favourable views of Pakistan, which is one point less than last year. This is the smallest percentage of positive ratings in the survey, along with Iran. At the same time, negative views have increased to 55 per cent, up four points since last year. Overall, Pakistan remains the second-worst rated country after Iran. Out of the 25 countries surveyed this year, 23 lean negatively in their views of Pakistan, and only Indonesians join Pakistanis themselves in saying they see the country as a positive influence, with a plurality of 43 per cent holding favourable views.

The most unfavourable views continue to be found in Western countries. Increasing proportions of Americans (83%) and Australians (79%, up seven points) say Pakistan’s influence in the world is mainly negative. The other Anglophone countries surveyed, Canada and the UK, are also very negative, but views are stable (72% and 69% negative respectively). In continental Europe, the picture looks very unfavourable as well. Negative views of Pakistan have dramatically worsened in Spain (85%, up 19 points to give the highest proportion of negative ratings of Pakistan) and in Germany (82%, up 15 points). Other EU countries also give very unfavourable ratings of Pakistan’s influence: 73 per cent in France, 57 per cent in Poland, and 49 per cent in Greece give negative responses. All of these continental European countries have fewer than ten per cent of their public saying the influence of Pakistan is positive.

At the periphery of Europe, views have shifted in Turkey. Largely positive the last time they were asked in 2011 (56% vs 28% negative), the Turks now are emphatically negative about Pakistan (22% vs 48%). Positivity has also deteriorated in Nigeria, dropping 11 points (down to 28%) while negative ratings are now given by a majority (54%, up eight points). In Egypt, overall views are unfavourable (15% positive vs 30% negative) but the opinion has grown more undecided than it was in 2012: a majority of 55 per cent does not have a clear opinion about Pakistan this year, as compared to a third in 2012. Public opinion in Ghana is also negative but has become more polarised (36% vs 47%, while a strong majority of 62% had no clear opinion in 2012), while Kenyans’ views have shifted from being divided in 2012 (33% vs 37%) to leaning negative in 2013 (23% vs 32%).

In Latin America, respondents continue to rate Pakistan negatively. Brazilians’ attitudes are the most unfavourable here (63% hold negative views), closely followed by Mexicans, among whom impressions have sharply deteriorated (58% hold negative views, up 19 points). In Peru and Chile, pluralities of 44 and 46 per cent respectively (both up six points) also continue to lean negatively.

In Asia, views among South Koreans and Japanese continue to be very negative, with proportions of 57 and 39 per cent respectively holding unfavourable views: only 15 and 6 per cent lean positive. Perceptions of Pakistan in neighbouring India have remained stable and negative (11% positive vs 45% negative). In China, a stable plurality leans negative (36%) but out of all the countries that lean negatively towards Pakistan, China’s attitudes are the most tempered by positive views (28%).

Pakistanis have become more positive in 2013 about their own perceived self-influence. While the public had a negative opinion of the country’s role in the world stage in 2012, following a 12-point increase in positive ratings (to 38%) and a five-point drop in negative views (to 30%), dominant opinions have now shifted and become positive overall.

 

Israel

Israel

Evaluations of Israel’s influence in the world have slipped a little further into negative territory in 2013. On average, in the 22 tracking countries surveyed both in 2012 and 2013, 52 per cent of respondents had negative views of Israel’s influence in the world, an increase of two points from last year. At the same time, the proportion of respondents giving Israel a favourable rating has remained stable at 21 per cent. Out of the 25 countries polled in 2013, 20 lean negative, three lean positive, and two are divided.

The USA is the only Western country surveyed holding favourable views of Israel, and the only country in the survey with a majority of positive ratings (51%, stable). Views in Canada and in Australia have remained entrenched in negative territory with respectively 57 and 69 per cent of unfavourable views.

In the EU countries surveyed, views of Israeli influence are all strongly negative and have either hardened further or remained stable. The UK is the most unfavourable country towards Israel in the EU with 72 per cent of Britons holding negative ratings, a figure in line with the percentage observed in 2012. The UK is followed by Spain (70% negative) where views have deteriorated due to a loss of positive ratings, now at just 4 per cent (down from 12%). Positive views have dropped eight points in Germany over the past year, down to 8 per cent in 2013 while negative inclinations have remained stable at 67 per cent. In France, the picture is stable with 21 per cent giving positive views (vs 63% negative) France is the EU country with the highest proportion of favourable ratings. Newly asked countries Poland and Greece have negative pluralities of 44 and 46 per cent respectively, while just 15 per cent lean positively towards Israel in both countries.

In peripheral Europe, views have cooled in Russia with the opinion shifting from being divided in 2012 (25% positive vs 26% negative) to leaning negative in 2013 (23% vs 32%). In Turkey, public sentiment towards Israel remains as strongly negative as in 2011. Over four in five Turks (81%) hold unfavourable views of Israel while just 8 per cent hold positive ones.

The picture is even more negative in Egypt where unfavourable views have reached a record high of 96 per cent in 2013 (up 11 points since 2012). Only 1 per cent of Egyptians hold positive views (down from 7%).

Apart from the USA, the most favourable views of Israel are found in two sub-Saharan countries. In Ghana, views have notably improved since 2012 and shifted from being divided to leaning positive this year. Forty-four per cent of Ghanaians say they consider Israel’s influence in the world mainly positive. This is up 25 points since 2012, but views have also become more polarised with an increase in negative views (32%, up 13 points). In Kenya, a stable plurality leans favourably towards Israel (42%), and overall views have gotten warmer as negative views have dropped 16 points to 15 per cent. Nigeria bucks this favourable trend, where public opinion has shifted from leaning strongly positive in 2012 (54% positive vs 29% negative) to being divided in 2013 due to a 19-point drop in positive views combined with an 11-point increase in unfavourable ratings (35% positive vs 38% negative).

In the Latin American countries surveyed, views have remained fairly stable and negative in Chile (29% positive vs 41% negative), Brazil (15% vs 58%), and Peru (16% vs 40%). In Mexico, views have soured. A majority of 53 per cent leans negatively towards Israel—by far the highest percentage recorded among Mexicans since tracking began there in 2007—and only 13 per cent post favourable ratings (down six points).

Indonesia and Pakistan complete the increasingly negative picture seen among the Muslim countries surveyed regarding perceptions of Israel. Views have continued to worsen in Pakistan (65% negative, up 15 points) and in Indonesia, where negative ratings have gone up nine points to 70 per cent.

In the rest of Asia, negative attitudes have also increased among the Japanese: 54 per cent lean unfavourably in 2013, up from 45 per cent last year. Indian attitudes remain stably negative (16% positive vs 26% negative). South Koreans also have negative perceptions but the picture is less critical than it was last year, as the proportion of unfavourable ratings has diminished to 56 per cent (down 13 points) while positive ratings have remained stable at 23 per cent. Finally, the views of the Chinese public have become much warmer and shifted from leaning strongly negative in 2012 (23% vs 45%) to being divided this year due to a significant decrease in negative ratings and a rise in positive views (32% vs 33%).

 

Iran

Iran

Global views of Iran continue to remain the most negative of any country tested in 2013, and they have deteriorated at an increased rate this year. On average, in the 22 tracking countries surveyed both in 2012 and 2013, 59 per cent have a negative view of Iran’s influence in the world, an increase of four points since 2012 and the highest negative percentage in the survey. At the same time, positive views have decreased by one point to 15 per cent—the lowest percentage in this year’s survey, along with Pakistan. Of the 25 countries surveyed in 2013, 22 lean negative, two are divided, and only one leans positive (Pakistan).

In Pakistan, a majority of 52 per cent give positive ratings to Iranian influence. This represents a 14-point increase since 2012 and is the highest proportion in the survey. Positive views toward Iran are high in Indonesia (34% positive) or Nigeria (27%). However, views in these two countries have deteriorated a great deal over the past year. While positive views among Indonesians have remained stable, the proportion of those holding negative views has increased by 12 points (to 36%): as a result, Indonesia has shifted from leaning positive in 2012 to being divided this year. Negative by a narrow margin in 2012 (40% positive vs 48% negative), Nigerian opinion has hardened its views in 2013 with a 13-point decrease in positive ratings combined with a six-point rise in negative perception.

In Egypt and in Turkey, positive inclinations towards Iran are very weak (respectively, down 12 points since 2012 to 15%, and down 19 points since 2011 to 17%), while negative perceptions are high (48% in Egypt, 57% in Turkey). Positive views in these two countries are much less prevalent than in Chile (23%), China (24%), and Ghana (37%), all non-Muslim countries that give the highest positive ratings to Iran after Pakistan, Indonesia, and Nigeria.

Ghanaian views have become much polarised in 2013, following a 21-point increase in positive views and a 19-point rise in negative ratings. These sharp movements have made the Ghanaian opinion shift from being somewhat negative in 2012 (16% positive vs 22% negative, with high numbers of undecided) to being divided in 2013 (37% vs 41%). Ghana is the only African surveyed country where there has been a marked improvement in perceptions of Iran, as Kenya has followed an identical pattern to that of Nigeria or Egypt, with a decline in positive views since 2012 (19%, down ten points).

The EU countries polled continue to exhibit very negative views of Iran’s influence. This trend has been stable for several years now and has been heightened in Germany (85% negative, up by 11 points). Populations in the UK (84%), France (82%), and Spain (80%) are also among the most negative out of the countries surveyed. With just 2 per cent holding positive views, Spaniards show the lowest proportion of positive ratings of Iran in the survey.

In North America, the picture is very similar to that seen in much of the EU, with negative ratings close to or above 80 per cent. Americans have the highest proportion of negative views towards Iran’s perceived influence (87%, up seven points from 2012), while a stable proportion of Canadians feel the same (79%). Views in Mexico are increasingly negative towards Iran, but they remain at lower level than their NAFTA counterparts with 59 per cent of unfavourable views (up 11 points).

Further south, Chileans’ opinions of Iran’s influence are a great deal more positive than its regional counterparts, with 23 per cent holding favourable views of its influence—an increase of ten points since 2012, and a notable contrast with Peru (10%) or Brazil (8%, down seven points). However, negative views have also increased in Chile (now 49%, up eight points).

Views in India are negative overall, with a plurality of 30 per cent holding unfavourable views, as was the case in 2012. However, there is a strong strain of uncertainty in India, with a majority of 53 per cent remaining undecided. Among South Koreans and Japanese publics, views are much more negative (73% and 55% respectively), while Australians’ attitudes are very similar to other Western nations (6% positive vs 83% negative, a stable finding).

 

South Korea

South Korea

Globally, views of South Korea have strongly deteriorated in 2013 but continue to be in positive territory. On average, in the 21 tracking countries surveyed both in 2012 and 2013, 36 per cent hold positive feelings toward the South Korean influence, which is one point lower than the proportion observed in 2012. At the same time, 31 per cent lean negatively—a marked increase of four points over the past year that has cancelled the nice improvement in attitudes toward Seoul seen in 2012. Out of 25 countries surveyed in 2012, 13 lean positive, eight lean negative, and four are divided. Within each region, views about South Korea are quite diverse and wide-ranging.

The most positive views of South Korea are to be found within the country itself, with 64 per cent having a mainly positive view (up seven points since 2012), while negative views toward their own country have concurrently dropped 12 points to 22 per cent.

Views of South Korea among its fellow Asian countries are highly polarised, with Indonesia the second-most positive after South Korea itself, posting 58 per cent of positive ratings (up eight points since 2012). Japan, however, is the third-least positive country toward South Korea. Positive views have decreased by 15 points down to 19 per cent while negative perceptions have increased by 12 points to 28 per cent, making Japanese opinion shift from leaning positive in 2012 to leaning negative this year.

China, while positive overall, has seen a decline in positive views by eight points to 44 per cent. Pakistan has transitioned from being split in 2012 to holding favourable views overall in 2013, with a seven-point increase in positive ratings (29%) and stable negative views (21%). In India, the opinion has shifted from leaning positive in 2012 to being perfectly divided this year, with 19 per cent giving positive ratings (down six points, vs 19% negative). Sixty-two per cent of Indians do not take a clear stance on their perceived influence of South Korea, the highest proportion in the survey. In Australia, the mood of the public has remained relatively stable and positive with a plurality of 45 per cent leaning favourably.

Sub-Saharan Africa tends to have a positive view of South Korea, with Ghana and Nigeria respectively posting the third and fourth most positive figures out of all countries. Ghana has seen a significant increase of 19 points in positive views, now at 55 per cent, although negative views have also increased by seven points to 15 per cent. Despite its positive stance on South Korea relative to most other countries surveyed, Nigeria has seen a 15 point decline in positive views (now at 48%) and an increase of eight points in negative views (now at 32%), showing a clear deterioration of public sentiment. Kenya is something of an outlier, with just 34 per cent posting positive ratings (down nine points), although overall attitudes remain positive with just 21 per cent of respondents giving negative ratings.

Equally split in 2012 (30% vs 30%), opinion in Egypt has shifted and is now leaning negative, with a ten-point decline in positive ratings to 20 per cent dipping below the 27 per cent who hold unfavourable perceptions.

Chile gives the most positive ratings of South Korea among South American countries at 40 per cent, an increase of 15 per cent, though negative views have also risen: they are now at 26 per cent after a seven-point increase. Views in Peru are somewhat positive with 31 per cent positive views, but negative perceptions are twice as high than they were in 2012 (25%, up 13 points), indicating a certain cooling of Peruvian attitudes. In Brazil, the overall picture is negative with 30 per cent of Brazilians holding positive views against a plurality of 38 per cent who feels negative. In Mexico, views have gone further into negative territory because of a 15-point increase in unfavourable ratings (45%) while positive ratings have remained stable (24%).

In North America, views have deteriorated over the past year. Americans remain positive toward South Korea with 47 per cent positive views, but negative views have increased by 11 points to 37 per cent. Meanwhile, Canadians have shifted from being strongly positive in 2012 (52% positive vs 32% negative) to being split this year, after a 14-point decline in positive views combined with an increase of nine points in negative views (now 38% vs 41%).

Overall sentiment toward South Korea in EU countries is rather lukewarm. Except in Spain, where views have dramatically reversed from leaning negative in 2012 to leaning positive this year (43% positive vs 21% negative), all countries have negative perceptions—or are divided, as in the UK (41% vs 40%) and Poland (31% vs 29%). Germans are the least positive toward South Korea of all publics tested at 17 per cent positive, and are by far the most negative about it, with 65 per cent leaning unfavourably (up 19 points). Greek opinion is also quite negative, with only 18 per cent holding favourable views against 33 per cent feeling the opposite way. In France, views have shifted from being somewhat positive in 2012 (45% positive vs 40% negative) to leaning negative this year following an eight-point decline in positive ratings (down to 37%) and a seven-point rise in negative ratings (47%). In peripheral Europe, Russians remain positively inclined toward South Korea (now 34% vs 24%), while the Turkish populace view South Korea’s influence negatively (30% vs 40%).

 

North Korea

North Korea

Perceptions of North Korea have become more entrenched in negative territory in 2013. On average, in the 22 tracking countries surveyed both in 2012 and 2013, 54 per cent of respondents feel negative about the world influence of the Pyongyang regime. This represents a four-point increase in negative ratings since 2012. At the same time, positive views have remained stable at 19 per cent—the third lowest percentage in the survey, ahead of Pakistan and Iran. Of the 25 countries polled in 2013, 19 lean negative, three lean positive, and three are divided.

The most positive views of North Korea are to be found in Ghana, where a dramatic increase of 22 points now puts positive views at 48 per cent. However, negative views have also increased by 13 points, now at 27 per cent, indicating that Ghanaians are more polarised toward North Korea than they were last year. Other favourable views are found in Indonesia, where 42 per cent of respondents hold positive views, the second highest percentage in the survey. Favourable perceptions have more than doubled among Indonesians (up 24 points since 2012), making opinion shift from leaning negative in 2012 to leaning positive this year despite a 12-point decrease in negative views.

Nigeria shows the third highest proportion of positive views toward North Korea, but the Nigerian opinion has strongly deteriorated with a 15-point decrease in positive views. As a result, Nigerians are now split in their views of North Korea (36% positive vs 37% negative), a shift from the strong favourable inclinations recorded in 2012 (51% vs 30%).

Views have also cooled in Kenya, where 20 per cent now hold positive views (down 15 points from 2012). Kenyans are now negative overall (20% positive vs 28% negative), a noticeable change from their split attitudes in 2012 (35% vs 34%). By contrast, views in Egypt have improved: while Egyptians express proportionally fewer positive views of South Korea (31%) than Nigeria, a 13-point decline in negative ratings (to 15%) means that their attitudes on balance are more strongly positive.

The most unfavourable views toward North Korea are found in its closest neighbouring countries. Japan exhibits the most negative overall perceptions, with an overwhelming 92 per cent of the population holding negative views: no Japanese respondents express positive views. Perceptions in South Korea are very similar, with only four per cent expressing a positive view against the 90 per cent holding negative views, as they are in Australia (7% positive vs 85% negative).

As for China, North Korea’s closest regional ally, opinion remains divided, with 32 per cent holding positive views—the fourth highest proportion in the survey—and the same percentage leaning negative. However, among the public of the other ally of North Korea in the region, Russia, feelings have cooled. Divided in 2012 (25% positive vs 21% negative), Russians have moved into negative territory this year with a nine-point decrease in positive ratings and a 14-point increase in negative ratings (now 16% vs 35%).

Views in Pakistan have remain divided (27% vs 27%) but are more polarised than they were last year, with more respondents giving a clear opinion: this year, 46 per cent did not express a clear opinion either way, a 14-point drop from 2012. This is not the case in India, where a majority do not take a decided stance (62%). Despite an eight-point increase in positive ratings, Indians remain negative overall on South Korea’s influence (15% positive vs 23% negative) and a majority is undecided (62%).

NAFTA countries all continue to hold a negative overall view of North Korea, with the USA being by far the most negative. Only six per cent of Americans feel favourably toward the country, while 88 per cent (up nine points) lean negatively. The picture is similar in Canada (7% vs 79%) and, to a lesser extent, in Mexico where 13 per cent are positive (down six points) and 54 per cent are negative (up nine points).

As in North America, the public sentiment toward North Korea within the surveyed EU countries continues to be very unfavourable. This is increasingly the case in Germany (3% positive vs 90% negative this year, 6% vs 81% in 2012). The publics of the UK and France follow that of Germany in holding the most negative views in the EU, with 83 and 81 per cent respectively. Spanish views have hardened, with only 5 per cent holding positive views (down five points) and 78 per cent giving negative ratings (up ten points). Asked to rate North Korea for the first time this year, Poland and Greece lean negative but not as strongly as the other EU countries already mentioned: two-thirds (68%) of Poles have unfavourable perceptions, while a strong plurality (46%) in Greece feel the same. Just to the east, Turkish respondents show a harsher view of North Korea than they did two years ago, with a 13-point increase in negative opinions (30% positive vs 51% negative).

Latin America has a more benign stance on North Korea than do its northern neighbours but the publics are still negative overall, especially among Chileans and Peruvians. In these two countries, attitudes have shifted from being divided in 2012 (26% vs 24% in Chile, 21% vs 23% in Peru) to leaning negative this year (30% vs 41% in Chile, 27% vs 35% in Peru). Brazilians remain negatively inclined toward North Korea, with stable findings from last year (19% vs 50% in 2012, 22% vs 47% in 2013).

 

Russia

Russia

Views of Russia’s influence have further deteriorated in 2013. In the 21 tracking countries surveyed both in 2012 and 2013, 30 per cent have positive views of the Russian influence in the world, one point less than in 2012. At the same time, the proportion giving negative ratings has jumped four points to 40 per cent. Of the 25 countries surveyed in 2013, only eight lean positive, 15 lean negative, and two are divided (Nigeria and Egypt).

Views have sharply deteriorated in the US, where an 18-point increase in negative ratings (59%) pushing unfavourable opinion to its highest level in the US since 2009. At the same time, positive ratings have dropped 11 points to 23 per cent. In Canada, opinion has also fallen into negative territory after being divided in 2012 (39% positive vs 43% negative) following a seven-point increase in negative ratings (to 50%) and a ten-point decrease in positive ratings (29%).

A similar change to that observed in Canada occurred in Australia, where the public has moved from being divided in 2012 (34% positive vs 38% negative) to leaning negative this year owing to a 15-point increase in negative ratings and a five-point decrease in positive ones. In the UK, attitudes have worsened too, as unfavourable views have gone up to 57 per cent (up eight points) while positive ratings have slipped to 26 per cent (down seven points).

In the other EU countries, perceptions of Russia are the most negative in France (63% negative, stable) and in Germany (61%, up seven points). Spaniards also show lean negative, but not to the same extent as the French or the Germans: a stable plurality of 43 per cent give negative ratings to the influence of Russia, while positive ratings are steady as well at 30 per cent. Greece is the only EU country with a plurality holding positive views (40%), while Poland has the second least positive views on the continent, after Germany, with just 19 per cent of the public giving favourable views.

Meanwhile, in the African surveyed countries, attitudes are split between Ghana and Kenya, where inclinations towards Russia are positive, and Nigeria and Egypt, where the publics are divided. Ghanaians are the most content with Russia’s influence after Russians themselves, with 56 per cent holding favourable views (up 30 points). A plurality of Kenyans continues to lean positively (30%), but Kenyan opinion has become more undecided compared to 2012 as positive views have dropped nine points while negative ratings went down eight points to 23 per cent. Egyptian responses are divided and stable (31% positive vs 30% negative), but uncertainty has also increased by ten points. Views among Nigerians have cooled significantly, with a decrease in positive ratings (42%, down 11 points) combined with an increase in negative views (42%, up nine points).

Views among Russia’s BRIC peers are mixed. China remains comfortably positive although favourable views have decreased eight points to 44 per cent, which incidentally is the lowest percentage ever posted by Chinese respondents about Russia since polling began 2005. In India, a small and stable plurality of 34 per cent continues to hold favourable views, while a quarter of Brazilians (25%) continue to be somewhat negative about Russian influence.

The publics of other Asian countries are negatively oriented in their attitudes towards Russia. Pluralities of South Koreans (40%) and Japanese (28%) lean unfavourably. However, negative sentiment is more moderate than it was a year ago in South Korea (down 13 points), while positive ratings have gone up by six points in Japan (14%) and a majority remains undecided (58%). Indonesian public opinion has shifted from being divided in 2012 (30% positive vs 30% negative) to leaning negative in 2013 following a 13-point increase in negative ratings (29% vs 43%). Similar views are expressed in Turkey (30% vs 46%). Views have worsened in Pakistan as well, where a strong plurality holds unfavourable views of Russia (47%, up nine points).

In Latin America, attitudes have warmed in Chile and Mexico, with 42 and 40 per cent respectively giving positive ratings—an increase of 14 points in Chile and 15 points in Mexico. The increase in positive views among Mexicans since 2012 means that Mexico shifts from leaning negative (25% positive vs 33% negative) to leaning positive this year (40% vs 29%). Peruvians, by contrast, have shifted from being divided in 2012 (25% vs 24%) to leaning negative in 2013 (25% vs 34%).

Interestingly, Russian views of their country’s international role have cooled significantly since 2012, with positive ratings dropping 14 points to 58 per cent and negative ratings increasing by seven points to 12 per cent.

 

South Africa

South Africa

Views of South Africa have deteriorated further in 2013, continuing the decline started in 2012. On average, in the 22 tracking countries surveyed both in 2012 and 2013, 35 per cent of respondents have positive views of South African influence in the world—two points less than in 2012. At the same time, the proportion of those holding negative views has increased by five points to reach 30 per cent. These changes make South Africa one of the countries where global views have deteriorated the most, after China, India, and Japan. Of the 25 countries surveyed in 2013, nine countries lean positive, 11 lean negative, and five are divided.

Continuing a trend noticed since views of South Africa began to be evaluated in 2010, the most favourable views are again found in the surveyed Sub-Saharan countries. Three quarters of Ghanaians lean favourably towards South Africa—this is up 20 points since 2012 and is the highest rating of South Africa in the survey this year. Ghana is followed by Nigeria, where 63 per cent give positive ratings. However, Nigerian views have cooled a bit as favourable perceptions have gone down nine points and negative ratings have gone up eight points (24%). Similarly, Kenyans’ positive views have also decreased, from 66 per cent in 2012 to 59 per cent this year.

In Northern Africa, sentiment towards South Africa among Egyptians has improved significantly and is now back to 2011 levels. Forty-two per cent of Egyptians feel positively about South Africa, an increase of ten points since 2012, while negative ratings have plummeted from 32 to 14 per cent.

South Africa is viewed cautiously by its counterpart emerging economies in the BRIC, and opinions in Brazil, India, and China do not seem to be quite settled yet. Somewhat positive in 2012, the Brazilian public is now divided following an eight-point drop in positive ratings (34% positive vs 38% negative). A similar drop occurred in India: opinion there has also shifted from leaning positive in 2012—but with high numbers of undecided respondents—to being divided in 2013 (22% positive vs 18% negative). Views in China are also uncertain; Chinese opinion is leans slightly positive overall (34% vs 29%). In Russia, while the public was somewhat positive in 2012, an eight-point increase in negative ratings has made the opinion shift to being negative this year (16% vs 22%, but with persistently high numbers of undecided Russians). A similar picture emerges in Turkey, where a once-positive public has reversed its views (43% positive vs 29% negative in 2011; 22% vs 46% in 2013).

Perceptions have cooled significantly in both Canada and the US, where opinions have shifted from leaning strongly positive in 2012 to leaning negative in 2013 (33% positive vs 43% negative in Canada, and 36% vs 41% in the US) due to a 13-point drop in positive ratings in both countries that was matched by a double digit increase in negative views. This suddenly reversing trend is also observed in Australia, where only a quarter (25%, down 16 points) of respondents continue to feel positive about South Africa’s influence, while a majority of 57 per cent now leans unfavourably (up 21 points and the highest proportion of negative ratings in the survey).

In Europe, the deterioration of views is also apparent in most surveyed countries. Attitudes towards South Africa are overall unfavourable in all EU countries but France and Poland. A French plurality of 47 per cent continue to hold favourable views but negative ratings have gone up by seven points to 33 per cent. Polish opinions, polled for the first time this year, are evenly split (22% vs 22%). Perceptions among the Spanish are stable and continue to be somewhat negative (32% positive vs 38% negative). The somewhat negative sentiment is also found in newly asked Greece (23% positive vs 29% negative). In Germany and in the UK, public opinions have shifted. While Britons leaned positive in 2012 (45% vs 38%), they are now somewhat negative (36% vs 42%). For Germans, a 19-point increase in negative ratings made the dominant opinion shift from being divided in 2012 (24% vs 23% with high numbers of undecided) to leaning negative in 2013 (22% vs 42%).

In two Latin American countries views have remained relatively stable, with negative pluralities in Mexico (39%, up five points) and in Peru (26%). In Chile, however, opinion is back to where it was in 2011 thanks to a 13-point rise in positive ratings (to 43%).

In the other countries surveyed not mentioned so far, views are quite diverse. Attitudes towards South African influence have deteriorated among Indonesians and are now divided (33% positive vs 36% negative) following a 15-point increase in negative perceptions. Public sentiment has improved in South Korea, where opinion has shifted from being divided in 2012 (40% vs 39%) to leaning somewhat positive in 2013 (37% vs 32%). Views remain very uncertain in Japan (19% positive vs 10% negative), and Pakistanis continue to be divided (25% vs 24%) despite a seven-point increase in positive ratings.

Methodology

In total 26,299 citizens in Australia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Egypt, France, Germany, Ghana, Greece, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru, Poland, Russia, South Korea, Spain, Turkey, the United Kingdom, and the United States were interviewed face-to-face or by telephone between December 10, 2012 and April 9, 2013. Countries were rated by half samples in all countries except for Egypt, India, Japan, and Poland. Polling was conducted for BBC World Service by GlobeScan and its research partners in each country.

In Brazil, China, Egypt, Indonesia, Kenya, and Turkey urban samples were used. The margin of error per country ranges from +/- 3.0 to 4.9 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

 

Country
Sample Size (unweighted)
Field dates
Sample frame
Survey methodology
Type of sample
Australia 803 February 25, 2013 – March 15, 2013 18+ Telephone National
Brazil 800 January 23, 2013 – February 15, 2013 18+ Face-to-face Urban1
Canada 1003 February 23, 2013 – March 21, 2013 18+ Telephone National
Chile 1200 December 10, 2012 – January 2, 2013 18+ Face-to-face National
China 1000 February 18, 2013 – March 24, 2013 18+ Telephone Urban2
Egypt 1021 March 10, 2013 – April 9, 2013 18+ Face-to-face Urban3
France 1003 February 12–22, 2013 15+ Telephone National
Germany 1002 February 14, 2013 – March 8, 2013 16+ Telephone National
Ghana 1001 January 9–24, 2012 18+ Face-to-face National
Greece 1000 March 6–11, 2013 16+ Telephone National
India 1207 March 25, 2013 – April 1, 2013 18+ Face-to-face National
Indonesia 1000 February 4–21, 2013 18+ Face-to-face Urban4
Japan 1560 December 22–23, 2012 20+ Face-to-face National
Kenya 1000 March 20, 2013 – April 4, 2013 18+ Face-to-face Urban5
Mexico 800 February 16–20, 2013 18+ Face-to-face National
Nigeria 800 March 16–23, 2013 18+ Face-to-face National
Pakistan 2200 February 15–28, 2013 18+ Face-to-face National
Peru 1020 February 16–20, 2013 18+ Face-to-face National
Poland 1060 March 7–13, 2013 18+ Face-to-face National
Russia 1009 January 29, 2013 – February 20, 2013 18+ Face-to-face National
South Korea 1000 March 18–21, 2013 19+ Telephone National
Spain 811 March 5–14, 2013 18+ Telephone National
Turkey 1002 January 28, 2013 – February 11, 2013 15+ Face-to-face Urban6
United Kingdom 1000 January 31, 2013 – March 9, 2013 18+ Telephone National
USA 1018 February 23, 2013 – March 17, 2013 18+ Telephone National
  1. In Brazil the survey was conducted in Belo Horizonte, Brasília, Curitiba, Goiânia, Porto Alegre, Recife, Rio de Janeiro, Salvador, São Paulo, representing 23 per cent of the national adult population.
  2. In China the survey was conducted in Beijing, Beiliu, Chengdu, Dujiangyan, Fenyang, Fuyang, Guangzhou, Hangzhou, Manzhouli, Quanzhou, Qujing, Shanghai, Shenyang, Shuangcheng, Wuhan, Xi’an, Xining, and Zhengzhou, representing 45 per cent of the national adult population.
  3. In Egypt the survey was conducted in Cairo, Giza, Shubra El-Kheima, and Alexandria, representing 24 per cent of the national adult population.
  4. In Indonesia the survey was conducted in Bandung, Jakarta, Makassar, Medan, and Surabaya, representing 27 per cent of the national adult population.
  5. In Kenya the survey was conducted in Urban areas with population over 10,000 inhabitants, representing 37 per cent of the national adult population.
  6. In Turkey the survey was conducted in Istanbul, Bursa, İzmir, Adana, Antalya, Samsun, Zonguldak, Ankara, Konya, Diyarbakır, and Erzurum, representing 55 per cent of the national adult population.

Research Partners

Country Research Institute Location Contact
Australia GlobeScan Toronto Oliver Martin
oliver.martin@globescan.com
+1 416 969 3073
Brazil Market Analysis Florianópolis Fabián Echegaray
fabian@marketanalysis.com.br
+55 48 3364 0000
Canada GlobeScan Toronto Oliver Martin
oliver.martin@globescan.com
+1 416 969 3073
Chile Mori Chile Santiago Marta Lagos
mlagos@morichile.cl
+56 2334 4544
China GlobeScan Toronto Oliver Martin
oliver.martin@globescan.com
+1 416 969 3073
Egypt Attitude Market Research Cairo Mohamed Al Gendy
mgendy@attitude-eg.com
+202 2702438
France Efficience 3 Paris and Rheims Christian de Thieulloy
christian.t@efficience3.com
+33 1 4316 5442
Germany Ri*QUESTA GmbH Teningen Bernhard Rieder
riquesta.rieder@t-online.de
+49 7641 93 43 36
Ghana Business Interactive Consulting Limited Accra Razaaque Animashaun
info@bigghana.com
+233 302 783140 / +233 302 782892
Greece Institute of Communication Athens Vivian Antonopoulou
vantonopoulou@mrb.gr
+30 2103318065
India Team C Voter Noida Yashwant Deshmukh
yashwant@teamcvoter.com
+91 120 424 7135
Indonesia DEKA Marketing Research Jakarta Irma Malibari
irma.malibari@deka-research.co.id
info@deka-research.co.id
+62 21 723 6901
Japan The Yomiuri Shimbun Tokyo Susumu Arai
arai8138@yomiuri.com
+81 3 3217 1963
Kenya Research Path Associates Ltd. Nairobi Jeremy Mwololo
jeremy.mwololo@rpa.co.ke
+254 20 2734770
Mexico Parametría Mexico City Francisco Abundis
fabundis@parametria.com.mx
+52 55 2614 0089
Nigeria Market Trends Lagos Jo Ebhomenye
joebhomenye@hotmail.com
+234 1734 7384
Pakistan Gallup Pakistan Islamabad Ijaz Shafi Gilani
isb@gallup.com.pk
+92 51 2655630
Peru Datum Lima Urpi Torrado
urpi@datum.com.pe
+511 215 0600
Poland Public Opinion Research Centre Warsaw Mirosława Grabowska
m.grabowska@cbos.pl
+48 22 693 46 93
Russia CESSI Institute for Comparative Social Research Moscow Vladimir Andreenkov
vladimir.andreenkov@cessi.ru
+7 495 650 55 18
South Korea East Asia Institute Seoul Wonchil Chung
cwc@eai.or.kr
+82 2 2277 1683
Spain Sigma Dos Int. Madrid Gines Garrido
petrana@sigmados.com
+34 91 360 0474
Turkey Yöntem Research Consultancy Istanbul Mehmet Aktulga
mehmet.aktulga@yontemresearch.com
+90 212 278 12 19
United Kingdom Populus Data Solutions London Patrick Diamond
pdiamond@populusdatasolutions.com
+44 207 553 4148
USA GlobeScan Toronto Oliver Martin
oliver.martin@globescan.com
+1 416 969 3073

Question Wording

M1A. Please tell me if you think each of the following countries is having a mainly positive or mainly negative influence in the world. ROTATE

at) China
01 – Mainly positive
02 – Mainly negative
VOLUNTEERED (DO NOT READ)
03 – Depends
04 – Neither, neutral
99 – DK/NA
bt) France
ct) The United States
dt) The European Union
et) Japan
ft) Israel
gt) North Korea
ht) Canada

 

M1B. Please tell me if you think each of the following countries is having a mainly positive or mainly negative influence in the world. ROTATE

at) The United Kingdom
01 – Mainly positive
02 – Mainly negative
VOLUNTEERED (DO NOT READ)
03 – Depends
04 – Neither, neutral
99 – DK/NA
bt) Russia
ct) India
dt) Iran
et) Brazil
ft) Pakistan
gt) Germany
ht) South Africa
it) South Korea

Global Poll: Obama Overwhelmingly Preferred to Romney

Header---BBC-Press-Releases

22 October 2012 – A new 21-nation poll for BBC World Service indicates that citizens around the world would strongly prefer to see Barack Obama re-elected as US President rather than his Republican challenger Mitt Romney.

The poll of 21,797 people, conducted by GlobeScan/PIPA between July 3 and September 3, 2012, indicates that Obama is preferred to Romney in 20 of the 21 countries polled. Overall, an average of 50 per cent would prefer to see Obama elected, compared to only 9 per cent who prefer Romney. The rest express no preference between the two.

Of all the countries polled, France is currently the most strongly pro-Obama, with 72 per cent wanting him to be re-elected and just 2 per cent preferring Romney. Australia (67%), Canada (66%), Nigeria (66%), and the UK (65%) are among the other countries with large majorities favouring Obama.

Pakistan, where 14 per cent want to see Romney elected compared to 11 per cent who prefer Obama, is the only country where the current President is not the favoured candidate—but here, three-quarters (75%) express no opinion. The countries with the largest proportions favouring Mitt Romney are Kenya (18%) and Poland (16%).

Despite Obama facing a closer race than in 2008, his support around the world has not slipped relative to four years ago. The current results are broadly in line with the results of a similar BBC World Service poll conducted in 2008, which found that Obama was the preferred choice for US President in all 23 nations polled. Compared to four years ago, support for Obama’s election has risen in seven of the 15 countries polled in both years (France, Brazil, the UK, Panama, Indonesia, India, and Turkey), dropped in four (Kenya, Mexico, Poland, and China), and is steady in four (Australia, Canada, Nigeria, and Germany).

The emphatic preference for Obama’s re-election worldwide is in sharp contrast to the state of public opinion in the USA, where polls now show the two candidates to be nearly tied in public backing.

GlobeScan Director of Global Insights Sam Mountford comments: “While the presidential race in America looks like going down to the wire, global public opinion appears to be firmly behind Barack Obama’s re-election—even if two in five express no preference between the two candidates.”

Steven Kull, Director of PIPA comments: “Obama’s election in 2008 led to a major recovery of America’s image in the world and people are showing little interest in changing horses now.”

A total of 21,797 citizens across 21 countries were interviewed face-to-face, by telephone, or online between July 3, 2012 and September 3, 2012. Polling was conducted for BBC World Service by the international polling firm GlobeScan and its research partners in each country. In six of the 21 countries, the sample was limited to major urban areas. The margin of error per country ranges from +/- 2.0 to 3.7 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

For more details, please visit www.GlobeScan.com or www.WorldPublicOpinion.org


Participating Countries

BBC2531 map v2

In Brazil, China, Indonesia, Kenya, Panama, and Turkey urban samples were used.



Click to enlarge charts.


For full methodology, question wording, and detailed results, including region-by-region data for all key questions, please see the drop-down links at the bottom of this article.


Media Contacts

For media interviews with the participating pollsters, please contact:

Sam Mountford, Director, Global Insights
GlobeScan Incorporated, London
+44 20 7928 5368
(Mobile: +44 7854 132625)
sam.mountford@globescan.com
Oliver Martin, Director, Global Development
GlobeScan Incorporated, Toronto
+1 416 969 3073
(Mobile: +1 416 721 3544)
oliver.martin@globescan.com

About GlobeScan

GlobeScan Incorporated is an international opinion research consultancy. We provide global organisations with evidence-based insight to help them set strategy and shape their communications. Companies, multilateral institutions, governments, and NGOs trust GlobeScan for our unique expertise across reputation management, sustainability, and stakeholder relations. GlobeScan conducts research in over 90 countries, is ISO 9001-2008 quality certified and a signatory to the UN Global Compact.

Established in 1987, GlobeScan is an independent, management-owned company with offices in Toronto, London, and San Francisco. For more information, visit: www.GlobeScan.com

About The Program on International Policy Attitudes (PIPA)

The Program on International Policy Attitudes (PIPA) of the Center for International and Security Studies at the University of Maryland, undertakes research on attitudes in publics around the world on a variety of international issues and manages the international research project. For more information, visit: www.WorldPublicOpinion.org

About BBC World Service

BBC World Service is an international multimedia broadcaster, delivering a wide range of language and regional services on radio, TV, online and via wireless handheld devices. It uses multiple platforms to reach its weekly audience of 166 million globally, including shortwave, AM, FM, digital satellite and cable channels. Its news sites include audio and video content and offer opportunities to join the global debate. BBC World Service offers its multilingual radio content to partner FM stations around the world and has numerous partnerships supplying content to news websites, mobile phones and other wireless handheld devices as well as TV channels. For more information, visit: www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice

Backgrounder: Region-by-Region Results

North America
In Canada, two thirds of respondents (66%) prefer Obama over Romney as the next President of the USA, with just 9 per cent favouring the Republican candidate. Support among Canadians for the current incumbent in the White House is thus at the same level as in 2008 when he ran against John McCain, and well above the global average of 50 per cent.

Latin America
In the four Latin American countries surveyed, respondents mostly support Barack Obama rather than Mitt Romney in the US Presidential election. In Brazil and in Panama, support for Obama is particularly high (65% in both countries), and has risen compared with 2008 levels (up 14 and 22 points, respectively).

Large pluralities of Mexicans (43%) and Peruvians (39%) also prefer Obama over Romney, but these proportions are significantly below the 21-country global average (50%). In these two countries, 50 per cent or more express no preference between the two candidates. In Mexico, support for Obama is not as strong as in 2008 when he was facing McCain—54 per cent backed him then.

Europe
European public opinion strongly favours Obama over his Republican challenger. France is the most strongly pro-Obama of all participating countries, with 72 per cent wanting him to be re-elected—22 per cent above the global average —and just 2 per cent preferring Romney.

Britons and Germans are also supportive of Obama, with 65 and 64 per cent respectively saying they prefer the Democrat candidate. The percentage of Germans favouring Obama has remained stable compared to 2008, but Obama’s support in the UK has risen by seven points.

Spaniards are not as bullish as their core EU counterparts. Though a large plurality of 45 per cent supports Obama against only 1 per cent who favour Romney—the smallest level of Republican support in the survey—a majority does not express any preference between the two candidates. In this way, views in Spain resemble those observed in Poland and Turkey, where pluralities supporting Obama (34% in both cases) are much lower than the global average (50%), and are outnumbered by majorities without any preference (50% and 57%, respectively). Furthermore, support for Obama in Poland has slipped since 2008, when it was recorded at 38 per cent. Poland is also one of the countries where support for Romney is strongest, with 16 per cent favouring the Republican candidate—the second highest proportion after Kenya (18%).

Africa
In the two Sub-Saharan countries surveyed, a preference for Obama in the next US Presidential election is clear. In both Kenya and Nigeria, two-thirds of the population (66%) say they would prefer to see Obama elected. Opinion among the Nigerian public is the same as it was in 2008 in the run-up to Obama’s first election (66% Democratic vs 11% Republican).

However, support for Obama in Kenya has plummeted, dropping 21 points, from 87 per cent four years ago. And, with 18 per cent saying they would prefer to see Romney win the election, Kenya is the country where support for the Republican challenger is the highest. Only 5 per cent of Kenyans preferred McCain over Obama in 2008.

Asia
The Asian countries surveyed are mostly split between two groups: one where the level of support for Obama is strong and above the global average (50%), and another where pluralities of respondents who prefer to see Obama defeat Romney are outnumbered by majorities without any preference between the candidates.

In the first group, Australia is by far the most strongly pro-Obama, with 67 per cent wanting him to be re-elected—the second-highest percentage in the survey (after France). This emphatic pro-Obama sentiment matches the level of support Obama registered in 2008 when he was opposed by John McCain. However, twice as many Australians favour today’s Republican candidate (13% for Romney now vs 6% for McCain then). Indonesians and South Koreans also have a strong preference for Obama over Romney, with 59 and 58 per cent respectively favouring the candidate of the Democrats. In Indonesia, support for Obama has risen 13 points since 2008, when just 46 per cent favoured his election.

India tops the second group of Asian countries, with 36 per cent favouring Obama, followed by Japan (33%). In Malaysia and China, 28 per cent feel the same. However, support for Obama is rather muted in these four countries, as is seen in the high proportions of respondents unable to choose between the candidates, which range from 52 per cent in India to 64 per cent in China. The trajectories of support for Obama over his Republican opponents have followed opposite directions in the two Asian giants. In India, support has risen by 12 points over the past four years, up from 24 per cent, whereas in China it slipped 7 points, down from 35 per cent in 2008.

Isolated from the two main groups above, Pakistan is the only country in the survey where Romney enjoys more support than Obama (14% vs 11%). However, this small difference in public favour is less striking than is the fact that 75 per cent of Pakistanis express no preference.

Methodology

In total 21,797 citizens in Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Malaysia, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Panama, Peru, Poland, South Korea, Spain, Turkey, and the United Kingdom, were interviewed face-to-face or by telephone between July 3, 2012 and September 3, 2012. Polling was conducted for BBC World Service by GlobeScan and its research partners in each country.

In Brazil, China, Indonesia, Kenya, Panama, and Turkey urban samples were used. The margin of error per country ranges from +/- 2.0 to 3.7 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

Country
Sample Size (unweighted)
Field dates
Sample frame
Survey methodology
Type of sample
Australia 1009 July 27 – August 11, 2012 18+ Telephone National
Brazil 828 July 26 – August 23, 2012 18-69 Face-toface Urban1
Canada 1002 July 20 – August 8, 2012 18+ Telephone National
China 1000 July 30 – August 15, 2012 18+ Telephone Urban2
France 825 July 5 – 12, 2012 15+ Telephone National
Germany 1002 July 13 – August 6, 2012 16-70 Telephone National
India 1010 August 7 – 16, 2012 18+ Face-to-face National
Indonesia 1000 July 3 – 18, 2012 18+ Face-to-face Urban3
Japan 1000 August 1 – 5, 2012 20-69 Online National
Kenya 1000 August 19 – 25, 2012 18+ Face-to-face Urban4
Malaysia 1212 July 3 – 31, 2012 21+ Face-to-face National
Mexico 1000 August 9 – 13, 2012 18+ Face-to-face National
Nigeria 1000 August 13 – 19, 2012 18+ Face-to-face National
Pakistan 2375 July 22–28, 2012 18+ Face-to-face National
Panama 1005 July 28 – August 10, 2012 18+ Telephone Urban5
Peru 1007 August 10–18, 2012 18-70 Face-to-face National
Poland 1011 August 14–22, 2012 18+ Face-to-face National
South Korea 703 August 13–17, 2012 18+ Telephone National
Spain 800 July 12–20, 2012 18+ Telephone National
Turkey 1002 July 12 – September 3, 2012 15+ Face-to-face Urban6
United Kingdom 1001 July 3 – August 18, 2012 18+ Telephone National
  1. In Brazil the survey was conducted in Belo Horizonte, Brasilia, Curitiba, Goiânia, Porto Alegre, Recife, Rio de Janeiro, Salvador, and São Paulo, representing 18 per cent of the national population.
  2. In China the survey was conducted in Beijing, Beiliu, Chengdu, Dujiangyan, Fenyang, Fuyang, Guangzhou, Hangzhou, Manzhouli, Quanzhou, Qujing, Shanghai, Shenyang, Shuangcheng, Wuhan, Xi’an, Xining, and Zhengzhou, representing 45 per cent of the national adult population.
  3. In Indonesia the survey was conducted in Bandung, Jakarta, Makassar, Medan, and Surabaya, representing 27 per cent of the national adult population.
  4. In Kenya the survey was conducted in Nairobi, Nyanza, Riff Valley, and the Central, Coast, Eastern and Western Regions, representing 37 per cent of the national adult population.
  5. In Panama the survey was conducted in Panamá, Chiriquí, Colón, Coclé, Veraguas, Herrera, Bocas del Toro and Los Santos, representing 70 per cent of the adult population.
  6. In Turkey the survey was conducted in Adana, Ankara, Antalya, Bursa, Diyarbakir, Erzurum, Istanbul, Izmir, Konya, Samsun, and Zonguldak, representing 56 per cent of the national adult population.

Research Partners

Country Research Institute Location Contact
Australia GlobeScan Toronto Oliver Martin
oliver.martin@globescan.com
+1 416 969 3073
Brazil Market Analysis Florianópolis Fabián Echegaray
fabian@marketanalysis.com.br
+55 48 3364 0000
Canada GlobeScan Toronto Oliver Martin
oliver.martin@globescan.com
+1 416 969 3073
China GlobeScan Toronto Oliver Martin
oliver.martin@globescan.com
+1 416 969 3073
France Efficience 3 Paris and Rheims Christian de Thieulloy
christian.t@efficience3.com
+33 1 4316 5442
Germany Ri*QUESTA GmbH Teningen Bernhard Rieder
riquesta.rieder@t-online.de
+49 7641 93 43 36
India Team C Voter Noida Yashwant Deshmukh
yashwant@teamcvoter.com
+91 120 424 7135
Indonesia DEKA Marketing Research Jakarta Irma Malibari
irma.malibari@deka-research.co.id
info@deka-research.co.id
+62 21 723 6901
Japan GlobeScan Toronto Oliver Martin
oliver.martin@globescan.com
+1 416 969 3073
Kenya Research Path Associates Ltd. Nairobi Jeremy Mwololo
jeremy.mwololo@rpa.co.ke
+254 20 2734770
Malaysia International Islamic University Malaysia Kuala Lumpur Prof. Dato’ Sri Dr. Syed Arabi Idid
sarabidid@iium.edu.my
+60 3 6196 4870 (ext 5097)
Mexico Parametría Mexico City Francisco Abundis
fabundis@parametria.com.mx
+52 55 2614 0089
Nigeria Market Trends International Lagos Dr. Jo Ebhomenye
joebhomenye@hotmail.com
+234 173 47384
Pakistan Gallup Pakistan Islamabad Ijaz Shafi Gilani
isb@gallup.com.pk
+92 51 2655630
Panama Dichter & Neira Panama City Gabriel Neira
gneira@dichter-neira.com
+507 236 4000
Peru Datum Lima Urpi Torrado
urpi@datum.com.pe
+511 215 0600
Poland CBOS Warsaw Mirosława Grabowska
m.grabowska@cbos.pl
+48 22 693 46 93
South Korea Hyundai Research Institute Seoul Seongkeun Choi
csk01@hri.co.kr
+82 2 2072 6223
Spain Sigma Dos Int. Madrid Gines Garrido
petrana@sigmados.com
+34 91 360 0474
Turkey Yöntem Research Consultancy Ltd. Istanbul Bülent Gündoğmuş
info@yontemresearch.com
mehmet.aktulga@yontemresearch.com
+90 212 278 1219
United Kingdom Populus Data Solutions London Patrick Diamond
pdiamond@populusdatasolutions.com
+44 207 553 4148

Question Wording

Q8. The candidates for the US Presidential election in November are Barack Obama of the Democratic Party, and Mitt Romney of the Republican Party. Who would you prefer to see elected president of the United States?.

ROTATE ORDER OF CANDIDATES. CODE ONE.

01 – Barack Obama of the Democratic Party
02 – Mitt Romney of the Republican Party
VOLUNTEERED (DO NOT READ)
03 – Either
04 – Neither
05 – No difference
97 – Other
99 – DK/NA